English for Careers Chapter 3 Writing Complete Sentences.

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<ul><li><p>English for CareersChapter 3Writing Complete Sentences</p><p>English for Careers: Business, Professional, and Technical, 10th ed. Smith and Moore 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All Rights Reserved.*</p><p>Your goals for Chapter 3:Write complete sentences to achieve clarity and emphasisCorrect fragments, run-ons, and comma splices</p><p>English for Careers: Business, Professional, and Technical, 10th ed. Smith and Moore 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All Rights Reserved.*</p><p>Basic needs of a sentenceIdentityWho or whatActionDoing, having, being, helping IndependenceAble to stand alone</p><p>English for Careers: Business, Professional, and Technical, 10th ed. Smith and Moore 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All Rights Reserved.*</p><p>Identity: The SubjectWord(s) that tell who or what the sentence is aboutAlways a noun or pronoun</p><p>English for Careers: Business, Professional, and Technical, 10th ed. Smith and Moore 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All Rights Reserved.*</p><p>Action: The VerbWord or words that tell what the subject does, has, or is.</p><p>English for Careers: Business, Professional, and Technical, 10th ed. Smith and Moore 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All Rights Reserved.*</p><p>A CLAUSE may be either </p><p>Dependent - cannot stand alone and make senseORIndependent - can stand alone and make sense</p><p>English for Careers: Business, Professional, and Technical, 10th ed. Smith and Moore 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All Rights Reserved.*</p><p>Every sentence must have at least one independent clause.An independent clause that begins with a capital letter and ends with correct punctuation is a complete sentence.</p><p>The camping trip was fabulous.</p><p>English for Careers: Business, Professional, and Technical, 10th ed. Smith and Moore 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All Rights Reserved.*</p><p>A dependent clause is NOT a complete sentence.Dependent clauses contain dependent conjunctions, such as after, although, as, because, before, since, until, when, why</p><p>After the sunset was gone </p><p>English for Careers: Business, Professional, and Technical, 10th ed. Smith and Moore 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All Rights Reserved.*</p><p>When a dependent clause is connected to an independent clause, it makes a complete sentence. Use a dependent conjunction: We threw away the eggs because of the bad taste.We havent eaten since dinner last night.Lets make sandwiches before going hiking.</p><p>English for Careers: Business, Professional, and Technical, 10th ed. Smith and Moore 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All Rights Reserved.*</p><p>Incomplete sentences are called FRAGMENTSA fragment looks like a sentence because it begins with a capital letter and ends with a period.</p><p>Because the sunset was beautiful.</p><p>English for Careers: Business, Professional, and Technical, 10th ed. Smith and Moore 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All Rights Reserved.*</p><p>To correct a sentence fragmentCross out the dependent conjunctionBeging the next word with a capital letterUse a closing puncuation mark.</p><p>Because The sunset was beautiful.</p><p>English for Careers: Business, Professional, and Technical, 10th ed. Smith and Moore 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All Rights Reserved.*</p><p>A RUN-ON is two independent clauses with no connecting punctuation</p><p>We enjoyed sitting around the campfire we could hear the owls.</p><p>English for Careers: Business, Professional, and Technical, 10th ed. Smith and Moore 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All Rights Reserved.*</p><p>A COMMA SPLICE is a run-on with a comma: </p><p>We enjoyed sitting around the campfire, we could hear the owls.</p><p>English for Careers: Business, Professional, and Technical, 10th ed. Smith and Moore 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All Rights Reserved.*</p><p>To correct a comma splice or run-onConnect independent clauses with a semicolonConnect independent clauses with a comma and a coordinating conjunctionsSeparate independent clauses with a period and capital letter (making two sentences)</p><p>English for Careers: Business, Professional, and Technical, 10th ed. Smith and Moore 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All Rights Reserved.*</p><p>A semicolon is one correct method of joining two independent clausesWe enjoyed sitting around the campfire; we could hear the owls.</p><p>English for Careers: Business, Professional, and Technical, 10th ed. Smith and Moore 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All Rights Reserved.*</p><p>Another way to join independent clauses is to insert a comma followed by one of the following conjunctionsand, but, ornor, so, yet</p><p>We went camping, but the rain ruined our trip.</p><p>English for Careers: Business, Professional, and Technical, 10th ed. Smith and Moore 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All Rights Reserved.*</p><p>Separate independent clauses into two sentences</p><p>We went camping. The rain ruined our trip.</p><p>English for Careers: Business, Professional, and Technical, 10th ed. Smith and Moore 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All Rights Reserved.*</p><p>Using transitional words and phrases when you join or separate clauses helps the reader connect ideas.We went camping; however, the rain ruined our trip.We went camping. Unfortunately, the rain ruined our trip.</p><p>English for Careers: Business, Professional, and Technical, 10th ed. Smith and Moore 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All Rights Reserved.*</p><p>Lets review. Are any of the following sentences fragments, run-ons, or comma splices?Jack is very smart he also writes well.Run-onAlthough Jack writes well.Fragment</p><p>English for Careers: Business, Professional, and Technical, 10th ed. Smith and Moore 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All Rights Reserved.*</p><p>Jack is very smart, he writes well.Comma SpliceJack is very smart, and he is also writes well.Complete sentence</p><p>English for Careers: Business, Professional, and Technical, 10th ed. Smith and Moore 2010 Pearson Higher Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All Rights Reserved.*</p><p>CHECKPOINT</p><p>Now you know how to: Construct complete and correct sentencesIdentify and correct: fragments, run-ons, and comma splices</p></li></ul>

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