WRITING COMPLETE SENTENCES Q1 - Writing Learning Goals  Write complete and effective sentences.  Indent, punctuate, and capitalize paragraphs properly.

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<ul><li> Slide 1 </li> <li> Slide 2 </li> <li> WRITING COMPLETE SENTENCES </li> <li> Slide 3 </li> <li> Q1 - Writing Learning Goals Write complete and effective sentences. Indent, punctuate, and capitalize paragraphs properly. Use topic sentences. </li> <li> Slide 4 </li> <li> Lesson Objectives By Friday, recognize fragments, run-on sentences, and comma splices, so you can avoid them when you write. QUIZ ON FRIDAY </li> <li> Slide 5 </li> <li> REVIEW </li> <li> Slide 6 </li> <li> PARTS OF SPEECH </li> <li> Slide 7 </li> <li> NOUNS PERSON PLACE THING IDEA 4 http://youtu.be/Sy72OPgdVuA http://youtu.be/Sy72OPgdVuA </li> <li> Slide 8 </li> <li> PRONOUNS A WORD USED IN PLACE OF A NOUN I, YOU,SHE, HE, IT WE, YOU, THEY 4 http://youtu.be/koZFca8AkT0 http://youtu.be/koZFca8AkT0 </li> <li> Slide 9 </li> <li> Words that describe action. </li> <li> Slide 10 </li> <li> 1- ACTION VERBS SHOWS ACTION </li> <li> Slide 11 </li> <li> 2- LINKING VERBS 4 LINKS SUBJECT TO NOUN OR AN ADJECTIVE IN THE PREDICATE PART OF THE SENTENCE 4 IS, ARE, WAS,WERE,AM, BEEN 4 SMELL, LOOK, TASTE, REMAIN, FEEL, APPEAR, SOUND, SEEM, BECOME, GROW, STAND, TURN 4 http://youtu.be/7MfeH0ZXEVs http://youtu.be/7MfeH0ZXEVs </li> <li> Slide 12 </li> <li> ADJECTIVES DESCRIBES A NOUN OR PRONOUN BEAUTIFUL sunset </li> <li> Slide 13 </li> <li> ADVERBS DESCRIBES VERB, ADJECTIVE, ANOTHER ADVERB http://youtu.be/lbgZfQ NBFS0 http://youtu.be/lbgZfQ NBFS0 SHINING BRIGHTLY </li> <li> Slide 14 </li> <li> PREPOSITIONS RELATES A NOUN OR PRONOUN TO ANOTHER WORD IN THE SENTENCE IN FRONT OF the cow http://youtu.be/ITXrRHBA5 OM </li> <li> Slide 15 </li> <li> WORD OR PHRASE USED TO EXPRESS STRONG EMOTION OR SURPRISE YIKES! http://youtu.be/GU qrljf1Nis </li> <li> Slide 16 </li> <li> CONJUNCTIONS CONNECTS WORDS OR INDIVIDUAL GROUPS OF WORDS AND, BUT, OR, NOR,FOR, SO, YET EITHER, OR, NEITHER, NOR, http://youtu.be/eZqI5b5wGA4 http://youtu.be/eZqI5b5wGA4 WATER AND ROCKS </li> <li> Slide 17 </li> <li> SENTENCE A sentence is a group of words that forms a complete thought. </li> <li> Slide 18 </li> <li> Basic Parts of a Sentence In other words: 1. Subject 2. Predicate 3. Expresses a complete thought </li> <li> Slide 19 </li> <li> Basic Parts of a Sentence a complete subject (which tells who or what is doing something) a complete predicate (which tells what the subject is doing). </li> <li> Slide 20 </li> <li> Basic Parts of a Sentence - 502 subject - who or what is doing something The subject is the part that is doing something or about which something is being said. Predicate - what the subject is doing The predicate is the part that says something about the subject. http://youtu.be/fdUXxdmhIsw http://youtu.be/fdUXxdmhIsw </li> <li> Slide 21 </li> <li> Subjects and Predicates simple subject consists of the subject without the words that modify it. Every subject is built around one noun or pronoun (or more) that, when stripped of all the words that modify it, is known as the simple subject. Consider the following example:noun pronoun A piece of pepperoni pizza would satisfy his hunger. The subject is built around the noun "piece," with the other words of the subject -- "a" and "of pepperoni pizza" -- modifying the noun. "Piece" is the simple subject. </li> <li> Slide 22 </li> <li> Subjects and Predicates Complete Subject made up of the simple subject plus its modifiers make the complete subject. Complete Subject: The large, umbrella-shaped parachute saved the life of the inexperienced pilot. (The complete subject is the simple subjectparachuteplus all its modifiers.) </li> <li> Slide 23 </li> <li> Subjects and Predicates Complete Predicate made up of the simple predicate plus its modifiers. The large, umbrella-shaped parachute saved the life of the inexperienced pilot. (The complete predicate is the simple predicatesavedplus all its modifiers.) </li> <li> Slide 24 </li> <li> Subjects and Predicates A simple predicate - the verb without the words that modify it or complete the thought. The glacier melted. The glacier has been melting. The glacier melted, broke apart, and slipped into the sea. </li> <li> Slide 25 </li> <li> Subjects and Predicates A compound subject - includes two or more subjects that share the same predicate (or predicates). The craters and plains of the moon have had no human visitors for some time. </li> <li> Slide 26 </li> <li> Subjects and Predicates A compound predicate - includes two or more predicates that share the same subject (or subjects). The glacier began to slip down the mountainside and eventually crushed some of the village's outlying buildings. </li> <li> Slide 27 </li> <li> Clauses and Phrases A phrase - a group of related words that does not contain a subject-predicate (verb) relationship, such as "in the morning" or "running down the street" or "having grown used to this harassment." </li> <li> Slide 28 </li> <li> Clauses and Phrases A clause - a group of related words containing a subject and a predicate (verb) </li> <li> Slide 29 </li> <li> Clauses and Phrases An Independent Clause - a group of related words containing a subject and a verb and form a complete thought. Dependent Clauses a/k/a subordinate clauses clauses that do NOT form a complete thought. </li> <li> Slide 30 </li> <li> Fragments - 503 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p- SAc3QgIsU http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p- SAc3QgIsU Incomplete sentences are called fragments. Fragments may be missing a subject, a predicate, or a complete thought. </li> <li> Slide 31 </li> <li> Fragments Fragments are incomplete sentences. Usually, fragments are pieces of sentences that have become disconnected from the main clause. One of the easiest ways to correct them is to remove the period between the fragment and the main clause. Other kinds of punctuation may be needed for the newly combined sentence. Info. provided by the Purdue University Online Writing LabPurdue University Online Writing Lab </li> <li> Slide 32 </li> <li> Fragments Purdue offers many majors in engineering. Such as electrical, chemical, and industrial engineering. Purdue offers many majors in engineering, s uch as electrical, chemical, and industrial engineering. </li> <li> Slide 33 </li> <li> Fragments Coach Dietz exemplified this behavior by walking off the field in the middle of a game. Leaving her team at a time when we needed her. Coach Dietz exemplified this behavior by walking off the field in the middle of a game, l eaving her team at a time when we needed her. </li> <li> Slide 34 </li> <li> Fragments I need to find a new roommate. Because the one I have now isn't working out too well. I need to find a new roommate b ecause the one I have now isn't working out too well. </li> <li> Slide 35 </li> <li> Fragments The current city policy on housing is incomplete as it stands. Which is why we believe the proposed amendments should be passed. Because t he current city policy on housing is incomplete as it stands, we believe the proposed ammendments should be passed. </li> <li> Slide 36 </li> <li> Fragments You may have noticed that newspaper and magazine journalists often use a dependent clause as a separate sentence when it follows clearly from the preceding main clause, as in the last example above. This is a conventional journalistic practice, often used for emphasis. For academic writing and other more formal writing situations, however, you should avoid such journalistic fragment sentences. </li> <li> Slide 37 </li> <li> Fragments You may have noticed that newspaper and magazine journalists often use a dependent clause as a separate sentence when it follows clearly from the preceding main clause, as in the last example above. This is a conventional journalistic practice, often used for emphasis. For academic (school) writing and other more formal writing situations, however, you should avoid such journalistic fragment sentences. </li> <li> Slide 38 </li> <li> Fragments Some fragments are not clearly pieces of sentences that have been left unattached to the main clause; they are written as main clauses but lack a subject or main verb. http://depts.dyc.edu/learningcenter/owl/exercises/ fragments_ex1.htm </li> <li> Slide 39 </li> <li> Run-On Sentences - 504 Run-On Sentences A run-on sentence is a sentence with at least two independent clauses (complete thoughts) which are forced together instead of being properly connected. </li> <li> Slide 40 </li> <li> Run-On Sentences - 504 To correct these sentences, you have several options: 1) Separate clauses using punctuation. 2) Separate clauses using a conjunction. 3) Rearrange the sentence (you may add or remove words). </li> <li> Slide 41 </li> <li> Run-On Sentences - 504 EXAMPLES Run-on sentence: He put on some sunscreen, the sun was so extremely hot, and he wanted to go inside. He put on some sunscreen 1st clause the sun was so extremely hot 2nd clause he wanted to go inside 3rd clause Corrected sentence: He put on some sunscreen because the sun was extremely hot. He wanted to go inside. </li> <li> Slide 42 </li> <li> Run-On Sentences - 504 In other words, run-on sentences happen when two or more sentences are put together as one sentence. Manta rays are similar to sharks they both have skeletons made of cartilage. http://youtu.be/P6ARqUdCkdg http://youtu.be/P6ARqUdCkdg http://grammar.ccc.commnet.edu/gramm ar/cgi-shl/quiz.pl/run-ons_add1.htm http://grammar.ccc.commnet.edu/gramm ar/cgi-shl/quiz.pl/run-ons_add1.htm http://depts.dyc.edu/learningcenter/owl/e xercises/run-ons_ex1.htm http://depts.dyc.edu/learningcenter/owl/e xercises/run-ons_ex1.htm http://www.writing.engr.psu.edu/exercises/i ndex.html http://www.writing.engr.psu.edu/exercises/i ndex.html </li> <li> Slide 43 </li> <li> Comma Splice http://www.quickanddirtytips.com/educa tion/grammar/comma-splice?page=all http://www.quickanddirtytips.com/educa tion/grammar/comma-splice?page=all </li> </ul>

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