Understanding, Monitoring, and Controlling Biofilm Growth in Drinking Water Distribution Systems

  • View
    130

  • Download
    2

Embed Size (px)

Text of Understanding, Monitoring, and Controlling Biofilm Growth in Drinking Water Distribution Systems

PowerPoint Presentation

Published in: Environ. Sci. Technol. (2016) Ahead of PrintDOI: 10.1021/acs.est.6b00835http://pubs.acs.org/doi/full/10.1021/acs.est.6b00835#showFigures

Published in: Environ. Sci. Technol. (2016) Ahead of PrintDOI: 10.1021/acs.est.6b00835http://pubs.acs.org/doi/full/10.1021/acs.est.6b00835#showFigures Biofilm growth on different pipe materials. Reprinted with permission from Ren et al.(43) Copyright 2015, Springer.Biofilm life cycle in DWDS.

Background: In drinking water distribution systems (DWDS), biofilm are the predominant mode of microbial growth present significant problems to drinking water industry: source of bacterial contamination, bad taste and odor and promote corrosion of pipes.

Published in: Environ. Sci. Technol. (2016) Ahead of PrintDOI: 10.1021/acs.est.6b00835http://pubs.acs.org/doi/full/10.1021/acs.est.6b00835#showFigures Biofilm growth as affected by water characteristics and operational conditions of the distribution systems

Published in: Environ. Sci. Technol. (2016) Ahead of PrintDOI: 10.1021/acs.est.6b00835http://pubs.acs.org/doi/full/10.1021/acs.est.6b00835#showFigures Schematic diagrams of sampling devices for biofilm monitoring

Robbins device (adapted from Manz et al.)Pennine Water Group coupon (adapted from Deines et al.)Corporation sampling device (reprinted with permission from Donlan et al.; copyright 1994, Elsevier)Biofilm sampler which consists of the coupon holder (B) and the pipe (A) in which the holder with coupons were placed (reprinted with permission from Juhna et al.) copyright 2007, American Society for Microbiology)Column filled with glass cylinders (A, water supply; B, water discharge; C, valve; D, pressure-reducing valve; E, valve; F, glass column; G, cylinders; H, flow meter; I, water meter; and J, valve; reprinted with permission from Van der Kooij et al.; copyright 1995, Elsevier)

Published in: Environ. Sci. Technol. (2016) Ahead of PrintDOI: 10.1021/acs.est.6b00835http://pubs.acs.org/doi/full/10.1021/acs.est.6b00835#showFigures

(a) Epifluorescence images of biofilms on copper pipes with (1) aggregating bacteria and (2) homogeneously distributed bacteria stained with the BacLight viability reagents. Green: bacteria with intact membranes. Red: bacteria with damaged membranes. Scale bars =10 m. (b) Environmental scanning electron micrographs of biofilms on copper surfaces. Images (1)(4) show the presence of multilayered bacterial aggregates with different morphologies on Cu surfaces. Note the multispecies microbial communities in (3). Reprinted with permission from Jungfer et al. Copyright 2013, Taylor & Francis.

Published in: Environ. Sci. Technol. (2016) Ahead of PrintDOI: 10.1021/acs.est.6b00835http://pubs.acs.org/doi/full/10.1021/acs.est.6b00835#showFigures

THANK YOUCheck out our other publication on biofilm formation and growth:

Liu,S.;Killen,E.;Lim,M.;Gunawan,C.;Amal,R. The effect of common bacterial growth media on zinc oxide thin films: identification of reaction products and implications for the toxicology of ZnO RSC Adv. 2014,4(9)43634370,DOI: 10.1039/C3RA46177G

Wonoputri,V.;Gunawan,C.;Liu,S.;Barraud,N.;Yee,L. H.;Lim,M.;Amal,R. Copper Complex in Poly (vinyl chloride) as a Nitric Oxide-Generating Catalyst for the Control of Nitrifying Bacterial BiofilmsACS Appl. Mater. Interfaces2015,7(40)2214822156,DOI: 10.1021/acsami.5b07971