The Theory That Would Not Die - How Bayes' Rule..._McGrayne, 2011

  • View
    219

  • Download
    0

Embed Size (px)

Text of The Theory That Would Not Die - How Bayes' Rule..._McGrayne, 2011

  • 8/9/2019 The Theory That Would Not Die - How Bayes' Rule..._McGrayne, 2011

    1/334

  • 8/9/2019 The Theory That Would Not Die - How Bayes' Rule..._McGrayne, 2011

    2/334

    the theory that would not die

  • 8/9/2019 The Theory That Would Not Die - How Bayes' Rule..._McGrayne, 2011

    3/334

    other books by

    sharon bertsch mcgrayne

     Prometheans in the Lab: Chemistry and the Making

    of the Modern World

     Iron, Nature’s Universal Element: Why People Need

     Iron and Animals Make Magnets (with Eugenie V.

    Mielczarek)

     Nobel Prize Women in Science: Their Lives, Struggles,

    and Momentous Discoveries

  • 8/9/2019 The Theory That Would Not Die - How Bayes' Rule..._McGrayne, 2011

    4/334

    the theory

    that would

    not die

    how bayes’ rule cracked the enigma code,

    hunted down russian submarines, & emerged

    triumphant from two

    centuries of controversy

    sharon bertsch mcgrayne

    new haven & london

  • 8/9/2019 The Theory That Would Not Die - How Bayes' Rule..._McGrayne, 2011

    5/334

    “The Doctor sees the light” by Michael Campbell is reproduced by permission of John Wiley & Sons; the lyrics by George E. P. Box in chapter 10 are reproduced by permission of John Wiley & Sons; the conversation between Sir Harold Jeffreys and D. V. Lindley in chapter 3 is reproduced by permission of the Master and Fellows of St. John’s College, Cambridge.

    Copyright © 2011 by Sharon Bertsch McGrayne. All rights reserved. This book may not be repro-

    duced, in whole or in part, including illustrations, in any form (beyond that copying permitted by Sections 107 and 108 of the U.S. Copyright Law and except by reviewers for the public press),  without written permission from the publishers.

    Yale University Press books may be purchased in quantity for educational, business, or promo- tional use. For information, please e-mail sales.press@yale.edu (U.S. office) or sales@yaleup.co .uk (U.K. office).

    Designed by Lindsey Voskowsky. Set in Monotype Joanna type by Duke & Company, Devon, Pennsylvania. Printed in the United States of America.

    Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data

    McGrayne, Sharon Bertsch.   The theory that would not die : how Bayes’ rule cracked the enigma code, hunted down Rus- sian submarines, and emerged triumphant from two centuries of controversy / Sharon Bertsch McGrayne.   p. cm.   Summary: “Bayes’ rule appears to be a straightforward, one-line theorem: by updating our initial beliefs with objective new information, we get a new and improved belief. To its adher-

    ents, it is an elegant statement about learning from experience. To its opponents, it is subjec- tivity run amok. In the first-ever account of Bayes’ rule for general readers, Sharon Bertsch McGrayne explores this controversial theorem and the human obsessions surrounding it. She traces its discovery by an amateur mathematician in the 1740s through its development into roughly its modern form by French scientist Pierre Simon Laplace. She reveals why respected statisticians rendered it professionally taboo for 150 years—at the same time that practitioners relied on it to solve crises involving great uncertainty and scanty information, even breaking Germany’s Enigma code during World War II, and explains how the advent of off-the-shelf computer technology in the 1980s proved to be a game-changer. Today, Bayes’ rule is used

    every where from DNA de-coding to Homeland Security. Drawing on primary source material and interviews with statisticians and other scientists, The Theory That Would Not Die is the riveting account of how a seemingly simple theorem ignited one of the greatest controversies of all time”—Provided by publisher.   Includes bibliographical references and index.   ISBN 978-0-300-16969-0 (hardback) 1. Bayesian statistical decision theory—History. I. Title.

    QA279.5.M415 2011 519.5′42—dc22

      2010045037

    A catalogue record for this book is available from the British Library.

    This paper meets the requirements of ANSI/NISO Z39.48–1992 (Permanence of Paper).

    10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1

  • 8/9/2019 The Theory That Would Not Die - How Bayes' Rule..._McGrayne, 2011

    6/334

    When the facts change, I change my opinion. What do you do, sir?

       —John Maynard Keynes

  • 8/9/2019 The Theory That Would Not Die - How Bayes' Rule..._McGrayne, 2011

    7/334

  • 8/9/2019 The Theory That Would Not Die - How Bayes' Rule..._McGrayne, 2011

    8/334

    contents

    Preface and Note to Readers ix

    Acknowledgments xii

      Part I. Enlightenment and the Anti-Bayesian Reaction 1

      1. Causes in the Air 3

      2. The Man Who Did Everything 13

      3. Many Doubts, Few Defenders 34

      Part II. Second World War Era 59

      4. Bayes Goes to War 61

      5. Dead and Buried Again 87

      Part III. The Glorious Revival 89

      6. Arthur Bailey 91

      7. From Tool to Theology 97

      8. Jerome Cornfield, Lung Cancer, and Heart Attacks 108

      9. There’s Always a First Time 119

      10. 46,656 Varieties 129

      Part IV. To Prove Its Worth 137   11. Business Decisions 139

      12. Who Wrote The Federalist ? 154

      13. The Cold Warrior 163

      14. Three Mile Island 176

      15. The Navy Searches 182

  • 8/9/2019 The Theory That Would Not Die - How Bayes' Rule..._McGrayne, 2011

    9/334

      viii Contents

      Part V. Victory 211

      16. Eureka! 213

      17. Rosetta Stones 233

    Appendixes 253

      Dr. Fisher’s Casebook 253

      Applying Bayes’ Rule to Mammograms and Breast Cancer 255

    Notes 259

    Glossary 271

    Bibliography 275

    Index 307

  • 8/9/2019 The Theory That Would Not Die - How Bayes' Rule..._McGrayne, 2011

    10/334

      ix

    preface and

    note to readers

    In a celebrated example of science gone awry, geologists accumulated the evidence for Continental Drift in 1912 and then spent 50 years arguing that continents cannot move.

    The scientific battle over Bayes’ rule is less well known but lasted far longer, for 150 years. It concerned a broader and more fundamental issue: how we analyze evidence, change our minds as we get new information, and make rational decisions in the face of uncertainty. And it was not resolved until the dawn of the twenty-first century.

    On its face Bayes’ rule is a simple, one-line theorem: by updating our initial belief about something with objective new information, we get a new

    and improved belief. To its adherents, this is an elegant statement about learning from experience. Generations of converts remember experiencing an almost religious epiphany as they fell under the spell of its inner logic. Opponents, meanwhile, regarded Bayes’ rule as subjectivity run amok.

    Bayes’ rule began life amid an inflammatory religious controversy in England in the 1740s: can we make rational conclusions about God based on evidence about the world around us? An amateur mathematician, the Reverend Thomas Bayes, discovered the rule, and we celebrate him today as the iconic father of mathematical decision making. Yet Bayes consigned his discovery to oblivion. In his time, he was a minor figure. And we know about his work today only because of his friend and editor Richard Price, an almost forgotten hero of the American Revolution.

    By rights, Bayes’ rule should be named for someone else: a French- man, Pierre Simon Laplace, one of the most powerful mathematicians and

  • 8/9/2019 The Theory That Would Not Die - How Bayes' Rule..._McGrayne, 2011

    11/334

      x Preface and Note to Readers

    scientists in history. To deal with an unprecedented torrent of data, Laplace discovered the rule on his own in 1774. Over the next forty years he devel-

    oped it into the form we use today. Applying his method, he concluded that a well-established fact—more boys are born than girls—was almost certainly the result of natural law. Only historical convention forces us to call Laplace’s discovery Bayes’ rule.

    After Laplace’s death, researchers and academics seeking precise and objective answers pronounced his method subjective, dead, and buried. Yet at the very same time practical problem solvers relied on it to deal with

    real- world emergencies. One spectacular success occurred during the SecondWorld War, when Alan Turing developed Bayes to break Enigma, the Ger- man navy’s secret code, and in the process helped to both save Britain and invent modern electronic computers and software. Other leading mathemati- cal thinkers—Andrei Kolmogorov in Russia and Claude Shannon in New York—also rethought Bayes for wartime decision making.

    During the years when ivory tower theorists thought they had rendered Bayes taboo, it helped start workers’ compensation insurance in the United

    States; save the Bell Telephone system from the financial panic of 1907; deliver Alfred Dreyfus from a French prison; direct Allied artillery fire and locate German U-boats; and locate earthquake epicenters and deduce (erroneously) that Earth’s core consists of molten iron.

    Theoretically, Bayes’ rule was verboten. But it could deal with all kinds of data, whether copious or sparse. During the Cold War, Bayes helped find a missing H-bomb and U.S

Recommended

View more >