Photography it’s about the light. also... high-speed sync neutral density filters white balance softboxes ISO “the decisive moment” radio triggers bulb

  • View
    213

  • Download
    0

Embed Size (px)

Text of Photography it’s about the light. also... high-speed sync neutral density filters white balance...

  • Slide 1
  • Photography its about the light
  • Slide 2
  • also... high-speed sync neutral density filters white balance softboxes ISO the decisive moment radio triggers bulb exposure specular highlights hyperfocal distance mirror lock-up dynamic range polarizers RAW vs JPEG bokeh
  • Slide 3
  • focal length the golden hour trailing curtain sync noise reduction infinity sweeps aperture settings gritty contrast EXIF data high-key portraits depth of field snoots, grids, and bounce cards intervalometers color saturation f/8 and be there
  • Slide 4
  • Well get to that overview -- general expectations syllabus & calendar photoblog week 1 -- basic terminology
  • Slide 5
  • success in the course will entail: attendance completing assignments -- in-class work, field work, submissions to class blog, homework (starting tonight) establishing and building a portfolio final assessment comp Good pictures are hard work
  • Slide 6
  • Good pictures are hard work...
  • Slide 7
  • ...or pure, blind luck:
  • Slide 8
  • Slide 9
  • And a camera Old saying #1: the best camera is the one you have with you. Meaning: you cant take good pictures if you dont have a camera. Make that any pictures. Message: Bring your camera to every class. In fact, take it everywhere, always.
  • Slide 10
  • Slide 11
  • Syllabus & calendar embrace imprecision Week 1 (today): this Week 2 (5 Mar): Taking Control: understanding and moving beyond automatic settings Week 3 (12 Mar): Extreme Closeup: intro to macro photography Week 4 (19 Mar): The Golden Age of Wireless: intro to off-camera lighting equipment & techniques Week 5 (26 Mar): Your Best Light: product photography and building a macro-studio softbox Week 6 (2 Apr): The Fruited Plain: landscape and scenic photography
  • Slide 12
  • Slide 13
  • Syllabus & calendar embrace imprecision Week 1 (today): this Week 2 (5 Mar): Taking Control: understanding and moving beyond automatic settings Week 3 (12 Mar): Extreme Closeup: intro to macro photography Week 4 (19 Mar): The Golden Age of Wireless: intro to off-camera lighting equipment & techniques Week 5 (26 Mar): Your Best Light: product photography and building a macro-studio softbox Week 6 (2 Apr): The Fruited Plain: landscape and scenic photography
  • Slide 14
  • Slide 15
  • Syllabus & calendar embrace imprecision Week 1 (today): this Week 2 (5 Mar): Taking Control: understanding and moving beyond automatic settings Week 3 (12 Mar): Extreme Closeup: intro to macro photography Week 4 (19 Mar): The Golden Age of Wireless: intro to off-camera lighting equipment & techniques Week 5 (26 Mar): Your Best Light: product photography and building a macro-studio softbox Week 6 (2 Apr): The Fruited Plain: landscape and scenic photography
  • Slide 16
  • Slide 17
  • Syllabus & calendar embrace imprecision Week 1 (today): this Week 2 (5 Mar): Taking Control: understanding and moving beyond automatic settings Week 3 (12 Mar): Extreme Closeup: intro to macro photography Week 4 (19 Mar): The Golden Age of Wireless: intro to off-camera lighting equipment & techniques Week 5 (26 Mar): Your Best Light: product photography and building a macro-studio softbox Week 6 (2 Apr): The Fruited Plain: landscape and scenic photography
  • Slide 18
  • Slide 19
  • Syllabus & calendar embrace imprecision Week 1 (today): this Week 2 (5 Mar): Taking Control: understanding and moving beyond automatic settings Week 3 (12 Mar): Extreme Closeup: intro to macro photography Week 4 (19 Mar): The Golden Age of Wireless: intro to off-camera lighting equipment & techniques Week 5 (26 Mar): Your Best Light: product photography and building a macro-studio softbox Week 6 (2 Apr): The Fruited Plain: landscape and scenic photography
  • Slide 20
  • Syllabus & calendar continued adapt & overcome Week 7 (16 Apr): The Wider World: overview of photography on & for the web Week 8 (23 Apr): Freeze Frame: photography of objects & people in action Week 9 (30 Apr): Smoke & Mirrors: options and potentials in post-processing Week 10 (7 May): April Showers, May Flowers: macro revisited and fieldwork Week 11 (14 May): Oh, The Humanity!: people pictures part I 21 May: GRADUATION PICTURES
  • Slide 21
  • Slide 22
  • Syllabus & calendar continued adapt & overcome Week 7 (16 Apr): The Wider World: overview of photography on & for the web Week 8 (23 Apr): Freeze Frame: photography of objects & people in action Week 9 (30 Apr): Smoke & Mirrors: options and potentials in post-processing Week 10 (7 May): April Showers, May Flowers: macro revisited and fieldwork Week 11 (14 May): Oh, The Humanity!: people pictures part I 21 May: GRADUATION PICTURES
  • Slide 23
  • Slide 24
  • Syllabus & calendar continued adapt & overcome Week 7 (16 Apr): The Wider World: overview of photography on & for the web Week 8 (23 Apr): Freeze Frame: photography of objects & people in action Week 9 (30 Apr): Smoke & Mirrors: options and potentials in post-processing Week 10 (7 May): April Showers, May Flowers: macro revisited and fieldwork Week 11 (14 May): Oh, The Humanity!: people pictures part I 21 May: GRADUATION PICTURES
  • Slide 25
  • Slide 26
  • Syllabus & calendar finalized uncertainty is certain Week 12 (28 May): People pictures part II Week 13 (4 June): Revision and portfolio work; final exam Week 14 (11 June): Final portfolios due
  • Slide 27
  • The bucket analogy fill it fast, fill it slow Light-gathering is governed by three basic factors: sensor sensitivity shutter speed aperture size Thats it. Every pictures exposure is a combination of these three elements
  • Slide 28
  • EVERYTHING IS A COMPROMISE
  • Slide 29
  • The need for speed Camera terminology is full of speed. Sometimes its literal (e.g. a fast shutter speed happens very quickly). Other times its more metaphorical (wow, thats a fast lens!). Well deal with this a little at a time. STOP! Another word youll see a lot of is stop. Briefly, stop is used as a noun meaning any way of doubling the amount of light. More on this to come.
  • Slide 30
  • photo courtesy of Flickr user norm_p
  • Slide 31
  • Sensor sensitivity The sensitivity of your cameras sensor is expressed with an ISO number. This number tells you how much light your cameras sensor can capture in a given amount of time. ISOs usually range from around 80 to 6400 or so. For example, my Pentax K10Ds range is: 100, 200, 400, 800, 1600 general rule: lower is better trade-off: high values allow shooting in low light but produce noise -- youll rarely want to go above ISO 400. Unless you like noise.
  • Slide 32
  • Noise: ISO 1600 at f/4.5, 1/100th of a second, 140 km/hr
  • Slide 33
  • Useless fact #1 ISO stands for International Standards Organization. Another term for the same idea is ASA (American Standards Association). You can forget that now.
  • Slide 34
  • Speed and stop revisited Remember speed and stop? Heres an example of the terms in use: ISO 400 is one stop faster than ISO 200 -- it can collect twice the light in the same amount of time.
  • Slide 35
  • Useless fact #2 In the days of film, ISOs were determined by the films chemical coating. Once you loaded a roll of film, you could shoot only at that films ISO until you finished the roll. If you had a night-time shoot and your camera was loaded with daylight slide film, say, you had to finish that roll (or waste it) before you could load with 800 or 1600 speed film. For reasons like this, many photographers stuck mainly to one versatile film, like 200 color or 400 black and white. Yes, black and white!
  • Slide 36
  • Shutter speed The shutter is like a door that opens and shuts (get it?) to allow light to enter your camera. Shutter speeds are expressed in fractions of a second -- or in whole seconds for long (like night time) pictures. Very high numbers, like 4000 (i.e., 1/4000 of a second) are used in extremely bright conditions -- like bright sunshine on a beach or snowfield -- and to freeze action. Low numbers (that is, whole seconds) are used with a tripod in low light. general rule: faster is better tradeoff: fast shutter speeds usually require big apertures and/or high ISOs.
  • Slide 37
  • Compromise Slower shutter speeds allow more light to enter in dim conditions......BUT......slower shutter speeds blur moving objects
  • Slide 38
  • EVERYTHING IS A COMPROMISE
  • Slide 39
  • Shutter speed limitations Handheld (which means without a tripod or other support), you cant really go slower than 1/30 of a second without blurring. Shake reduction technology is changing this, but not by much. Every camera has a maximum sync speed (the fastest shutter speed you can set when using a flash). Faster sync speeds allow more flexibility.
  • Slide 40
  • What do 3,600 seconds look like? photo courtesy of Flickr user manyfires
  • Slide 41
  • Aperture means opening This is where we move from