INTRODUCTION. Concepts HCI, CHI Usability User-centered Design (UCD) An approach to design (software, Web, other) that involves the user Interaction Design.

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<ul><li> Slide 1 </li> <li> INTRODUCTION </li> <li> Slide 2 </li> <li> Concepts HCI, CHI Usability User-centered Design (UCD) An approach to design (software, Web, other) that involves the user Interaction Design (ID) Something different than HCI? </li> <li> Slide 3 </li> <li> What is HCI Human-computer interaction is a discipline concerned with the design, evaluation and implementation of interactive computing systems for human use and with the study of major phenomena surrounding them (SIGCHI). HCI seeks to understand the constraints and paradigms that define how people use technology. Cognitive science provides detailed knowledge of how people perceive, understand, and remember information; HCI applies this knowledge to predict how people will react to interfaces, and how those interfaces can be optimized for humans. (Nielsen) </li> <li> Slide 4 </li> <li> Usability Efficiency Effectiveness Satisfaction How to measure? </li> <li> Slide 5 </li> <li> User Centered Design An approach to UI development and system development. Focuses on understanding: Users, and Their goals and tasks, and The environment (physical, organizational, social) Pay attention to these throughout development </li> <li> Slide 6 </li> <li> ISO on user centered design ISO 13407 describes human-centered design processes for interactive systems Principles of human-centered design: Active involvement of users Appropriate allocation of function between user and system Iteration of design solutions Multidisciplinary design teams Essential activities in human-centered design: Understand and specify the context of use Specify the user and organizational requirements Produce design solutions (prototypes) Evaluate designs with users against requirements </li> <li> Slide 7 </li> <li> Interaction Design Designing interactive products to support people in their everyday and working lives Sharp, Rogers and Preece (2002) The design of spaces for human communication and interaction Winograd (1997) Goals: Develop usable products Usability means easy to learn, effective to use and provide an enjoyable experience Involve users in the design process </li> <li> Slide 8 </li> <li> From HCI to ID Human-computer interaction (HCI) is: concerned with the design, evaluation and implementation of interactive computing systems for human use and with the study of major phenomena surrounding them (ACM SIGCHI, 1992, p.6) Interaction design (ID) is: the design of spaces for human communication and interaction (Winograd, 1997) One distinction: more application areas, more technologies and more issues to consider when designing interfaces </li> <li> Slide 9 </li> <li> Interdisciplinary approach Interdisciplinary fields (e.g HCI, CSCW) Design practices (e.g. graphic design) Academic disciplines (e.g. computer science, psychology) Interaction Design </li> <li> Slide 10 </li> <li> What do professionals do in the HCI or ID business? interaction designers - ?? usability engineers - ?? web designers information architects - ?? user experience designers - ?? </li> <li> Slide 11 </li> <li> What do professionals do in the HCI or ID business? interaction designers - people involved in the design of all the interactive aspects of a product usability engineers - people who focus on evaluating products, using usability methods and principles web designers - people who develop and create the visual design of websites, such as layouts information architects - people who come up with ideas of how to plan and structure interactive products user experience designers - people who do all the above but who may also carry out field studies to inform the design of products </li> <li> Slide 12 </li> <li> HCI concerns Make an interactive system be useful for a task, and support that task effectively Easy to use, easy to learn, avoid errors Must understand users, understand users tasks Create a usable logical interface A users conceptual model of the system Overall design of how we interact Physical and low-level design Physical interface: buttons, keys, screens SW interface: menus, screens, colors Evaluating usability During development, after completion </li> <li> Slide 13 </li> <li> UCD/ID in short Identify needs and establish requirements Develop alternative designs Build interactive prototypes that can be communicated and assessed Evaluate what is being built throughout the process That is what you (we) will do this semester </li> <li> Slide 14 </li> <li> I hope each of you will discover his/her ability during this course </li> <li> Slide 15 </li> <li> Assessment Project - required stages: Target users identification Justify the need for the proposed product Functionalities identification (S4-S6) Requirements Prototype development Prototype evaluation with real users (S8) Applying the required changes to the prototype User interface testing (S10) Usability testing (S11) User interface generation for multiple devices (S12) Applying changes to the developed product in order to be used by people with disabilities/ designing an non-conventional interaction method to the product (S14) </li> </ul>

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