HEAD START & EARLY HEAD START 2015-16 Annuaآ  HIGHLIGHTS & CHANGES. The Head Start/Early Head Start

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  • HEAD START & EARLY HEAD START

    2015-16 ANNUAL REPORTY E A R E N D I N G A U G U S T 31 , 2 0 1 6

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    TABLE OF CONTENTS Program Description, Highlights Enrollment Characteristics of Children and Families, Service Opportunities for Families, Parental Engagement Health Services Mental Health Services, Services for Children with Disabilities, Family Services and Dental Services Results of Monitoring Visits Financial Aspects, Budgetary Expenditures and Proposed Budget, Federal Results Review Preparing Children for Kindergarten Documentation of Children’s Progress Program Impact - One Parent’s Story Community Assessment Summary A Look to the Future

    2-3 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 |

    8-9 | 10-11 |

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    13-15 | 16 |

    HEAD START & EARLY HEAD START Y E A R E N D I N G

    August 31, 2016 ANNUAL REPORT FOR

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    HIGHLIGHTS & CHANGES The Head Start/Early Head Start program continued to provide excellent services for children and families during the 2015-2016 school year.

    • The program had two additional monitoring visits during the 2015-2016 year completing the review cycle that began during the 2014-2015 year. The program had only five areas of non-compliance and developed plans for improvement, which were approved by the Office of Head Start.

    • Due to continued issues with enrollment, the class at Gunter ISD was discontinued.

    • Because of increased community need, Crandall ISD added a new Head Start class during the 2015-2016 school year, and the program continued to maintain its funded enrollment.

    • The blended model for CPR instruction, piloted during the 2014- 2015 school year, continued to be successful as more of these sessions were offered during the 2015-2016 year.

    • The Head Start and Early Head Start program continued to use Teaching Strategies GOLD to determine children’s progress on the mandated Child Outcomes.

    • The results from the Classroom Assessment Scoring System (CLASS) for Head Start, along with the analysis of the results of student performance on GOLD, the assessment tool, helped to guide the individual training, support, and mentoring of the teachers.

    • The Head Start Education team successfully adopted and piloted the Practice-based Coaching Model in various formats, such as:

    • Teachers Learning and Collaborating (TLC), was facilitated by Head Start Education Consultant, Ginger Williford, from January to May with 6 teachers and 6 instructional assistants. In this pilot, the teachers and instructional assistants varied in their years of experience and the types of credentials they held. They set goals for themselves, based on the results and feedback from the Classroom Assessment Scoring System (CLASS) conducted in their classrooms. They videotaped themselves using the strategies that they were striving to implement. As a group, the participants viewed the video clips, offering reflective feedback and suggestions for continuous improvement. The outcome for the participants was very positive and showed growth in awareness and teaching skills.

    PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Region 10 Education Service Center

    (ESC) was the grantee for Head Start

    and Early Head Start services and

    partnered with eighteen (18) school

    districts in Collin, Ellis, Grayson,

    Kaufman and Rockwall counties

    to provide services to a funded

    enrollment of 1,120.

    HEAD START & EARLY HEAD START Y E A R E N D I N G

    August 31, 2016 ANNUAL REPORT FOR

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    HIGHLIGHTS & CHANGES • One-on-one coaching, involving the coach/consultant visiting regularly with the teacher or instructional assistant, was another coaching model. The teacher or instructional assistant set a goal or goals, based on CLASS data, and recorded video clips of themselves, demonstrating their use of teaching strategies related to their goals. Using reflective feedback, the coach/consultant and the teacher or instructional assistant jointly viewed the clips and discussed the challenges and successes of the implementation.

    • Teaching teams, which involved the coach/consultant visiting regularly with the teacher and instructional assistant together, was yet another coaching method. The participants set individual goals, based on CLASS data, recorded video clips of themselves in those particular teaching scenarios according to the goals they had set, and the coach and the teaching team viewed and critiqued them together through reflective feedback.

    • The Early Head Start home-based program achieved compliance with the 17 Essential Requirements for the nationally acclaimed Parents as Teachers program. These requirements are earmarks of quality in a home-based early childhood education program.

    • The Early Head Start program also successfully implemented the Frog Street Infant/Toddler Curriculum.

    ENROLLMENT The Region 10 ESC Head Start/Early Head Start program served a total of one thousand two hundred forty-three (1,243) children in partnership with Allen ISD, Crandall ISD, Denison ISD, Ennis ISD, Farmersville ISD, Forney ISD, Frisco ISD, Kemp ISD, Mabank ISD, McKinney ISD, Midlothian ISD, Palmer ISD, Pottsboro ISD, Rockwall ISD, Royse City ISD, Sherman ISD, Waxahachie ISD and Whitesboro ISD. One thousand twenty-nine (1,029) three and four-year-old children were served in Head Start/Pre-Kindergarten wrap- around classes in these school districts. Two hundred fourteen (214) infants, toddlers, and pregnant women were served in Early Head Start at three sites – McKinney, Rockwall and Sherman. Along with serving families from the community, the Early Head Start program was in partnership with the local school districts’ pregnant and parenting teen programs.

    Head Start maintained full enrollment throughout the year and had a waiting list at each site. The size of the waiting list varied based on the population of each community, and the combined waiting list total was one thousand three hundred sixty-three (1,363). Head Start served 43% of the children eligible for the program.

    Early Head Start experienced a similar situation, maintaining full enrollment throughout the year with a waiting list at all three sites. The combined waiting list was three hundred fifty-seven (357), and Early Head Start served 37% of the eligible infants, toddlers and pregnant women.

    Each participant was determined eligible based on criteria established by the federal Office of Head Start. Data related to children’s eligibility was reported as follows:

    Type of Eligibility Head Start

    Early Head Start

    Income below 100% of poverty line 731 101

    Recipient of public assistance (Temporary Assistance for Needy Families, Supplemental Security Income, etc.) 113 19

    Status as foster child 49 17

    Status as homeless 66 73

    Over income 54 4

    PROGRAM DESCRIPTION & HIGHLIGHTS REGION 10 ESC HEAD START/EARLY HEAD START 2015-2016

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    SERVICE OPPORTUNITIES FOR FAMILIES Head Start and Early Head Start provided a wide array of services for children and their families. The Performance Standards stated the type of services that must be made available for families, and families chose their level of participation from the many opportunities provided. Services were available to families in the areas of health, mental health, nutrition, parental involvement, social services and education.

    PARENTAL ENGAGEMENT Parents of all ages - including teen parents, foster parents, and grandparents raising grandchildren - were encouraged to participate in special activities. These opportunities included volunteering in a class or the Head Start/Early Head Start office, participating in special campus events, attending a variety of campus Parent Committee meetings and activities, participating in training opportunities, being involved in home visits and parent/teacher conferences and serving on Policy Council, the Education Advisory Committee or the Health Services Advisory Committee. Head Start/ Early Head Start campuses also provided some special programs directed toward the father or the male figure in the child’s life; more than 109 fathers participated in at least one event during the school year. School-readiness activities were also shared with families to provide ideas for parents to continue the child’s learning in the home environment.

    HEAD START & EARLY HEAD START Y E A R E N D I N G

    August 31, 2016 ANNUAL REPORT FOR

    CHARACTERISTICS OF CHILDREN AND FAMILIES Language

    In Head Start, 69.6% of the families identified themselves as monolingual English speakers, and 27.7% identified themselves as predominantly Spanish speakers. Small percentages (less than 1%) of families identified themselves as speakers of Middle Eastern, South Asian, East Asian, European, Slavic and African languages; one family declined to specify a primary language, and four did not specify. The percentage of English and Spanish speaking families was similar to that of the 2014-2015 year.

    In Early Head Start, 67% of the families identified themselves as monolingual English speakers, and 33% identified themselves as predominantly Spanish speakers, which is consistent with the percentages identified in the 2014-2015 year.

    Ethnicity and Race

    The information below indicates the race and ethnicity of the children involved in Head Start and Early H

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