Embedding Language and Literacy in Child–Directed Activities

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Embedding Language and Literacy in ChildDirected Activities. Day 2. Outcomes. Review Dialogic Reading Assignments Embedding language and literacy activities i n child-directed learning through play, story re-tell and interest areas . - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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Embedding Language and Literacy in ChildDirected ActivitiesDay 21Review Dialogic Reading AssignmentsEmbedding language and literacy activitiesin child-directed learning through play, story re-tell and interest areas Outcomes2The opposite of play is not work, its depression.

Creativity is messy, learning is noisy, and play is serious business.35Research tells usIn story retell - acting is more effective than drawing or writing at the preschool age levelSmall group size is more effective for story retelling than large group or one to one reading experiencesRelating the story to child interest and prior knowledge makes for teacher success in story retellUsing visual aids, prompts, open-ended questions, reviewing and re-reading storiesStory Retelling6Use propsMake clothesline story propsOffer picture propsUse costumes and dramatic play propsCollect puppetsCateheroman/story-retelling-props PinterestLending Library AEA I pad, smart boards, e books, playaways

ResourcesI do You watchI do You helpYou do I helpYou do I watch

Scaffold story retelling8Serve as a good language modelGive children interesting firsthand experiences to talk aboutRepeat and reinforce new wordsObserve, wait, and listenTalk with children frequentlyEncourage conversations that go beyond the here-and-nowUse open-ended questions and promptsRead to children daily and talk about the story before, during, and after readingEnjoy songs, rhymes, and fingerplays together throughout the dayPlay language games and provide language materialsOffer models so children can hear their home languagesShare informational books that relate to the childrens particular interests

The Teachers Role in Promoting Vocabulary and Language Development

9The LearningEnviornmentThe Teacher'sRoleThe Family's RoleWhat ChildrenLearnResearch and TheoryBlocksDramatic PlayToys & GamesArtLibraryDiscoverySand & Water

Music & MovementCookingComputersOutdoorsThe Creative Curriculum FrameworkHow ChildrenDevelop and Learn10Blocks

11HandoutGOLD Objectives Occurring in the Block Area12Creating an Environment for Block PlaySelecting MaterialsDisplaying Blocks and PropsCleanup--A Special Challenge

13Props and Accessories Dollhouse with furniture Multi-ethnic wooden figures Traffic signs, gas pumps Telephone wire Paper towel rolls Thin pieces of rubber tubing Paper, markers, and scissors Popsicle sticks Hats Tiles, linoleum squares, rugs Pulleys and string Toy carpentry tools Vinyl rain gutters

Books, magazines, etc. with pictures of buildings, roads and bridges Floor map of city Castle blocks Shells and pebbles Cardboard boxes/shoeboxes Play money Large fabric scraps Logos from local businesses Driftwood or small logs Styrofoam or cardboard packaging materials Old blueprints14Materials to encourage literacy skillsBooks and pictures about construction, buildings, workers, tools, construction and emergency vehicles, architecture, repairs, roads, bridgesAdvertisements for construction materials and tools

BlueprintsFloor plansGraph paperLogos of local businesses and familiar productsMemo padsNewspapersRepair manualsTraffic signs15

Blocks and props are all neatly arranged so children can easily find what they need and return them.Tape on the floor defines a no-building zone near the shelf which prevents children from building where their constructions might be knocked over by other builders who aretaking blocks off the shelf or returning them.16LocationAway from line of trafficAmple spacePreferably in a corner Near other noisy areasDefined by shelvesSet upSmooth flat carpetThree shelvestwo for blocks and one for propsSuggested MaterialsUnit blocks (390 pcs.)Road signsHollow blocks (48 pcs.)Small vehiclesPeople propsTrain setAnimal propsConstruction Books17Unit Blocks

18Hollow Blocks

19Other Types of Blocks and Construction Materials

Brick cardboard blocks

Foam blocks

Large plastic blocks

PVC pipes

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21Block Area Clean-Up Suggestions

Give children a 5-minute warning

Allow extra time

Let children continue working if they are truly engrossed

Help children get started

Make clean-up into a game22 Give each child a ticket with a block shape on it. Children put away all blocks that match that shape.

Tell children, Bring all the blocks to me that look like this one. As they bring all blocks of one shape, show them where on the shelf the shape belongs by having them compare the shape to the labels.

Declare a number for the day: Today well clean up the blocks by threes. Each child then collects three blocks at a time and puts them away.23What Children Learn in the Block AreaSocial/EmotionalPhysicalLanguageCognitiveLiteracyMathematicsScience and TechnologySocial StudiesThe ArtsEnglish Language Acquisition

24HandoutHelping Children Learn in the Block Area25The Teachers RoleObserving and Responding to Individual Children

26Stages of Block Play

Stage 1: Carrying Blocks

Carry them

Pile them in trucks

Learn their properties

Gain an understanding of what they can do

27Stages of Block Play

Stage 2:Piling Blocks and Making Roads

Continue to explore

Make towers

Begin to creatively represent

Begin by making roads, then start connecting roads and towers

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Stages of Block Play

Stage 3:Connecting Blocks to Create Structures

Bridge

Making enclosures

Designs

29Stages of Block Play

Stage 4:Making Elaborate Constructions

Build with dexterity and skill

Build above, around or over obstacles

Artistic and complex structures

Need a variety and large quantity of blocks

Constructions are a setting for dramatic play

30The Teachers RoleObserving and Responding to Individual ChildrenInteracting With Children in the Block Area

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What do you say to a child who makes this structure?32

What do you say to a child who makes this structure?Thats nice. or Good job.

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What do you say to a child who makes this structure?Thats nice. or Good job.Says nothing about what the child didDoesnt give the child a chance to talk to you about what they did.Implies that the goal is to make something you think is nice.34

What do you say to a child who makes this structure?All the blocks in your road are the same size. or You made a little curve with the blocks. 35

What do you say to a child who makes this structure?All the blocks in your road are the same size. or You made a little curve with the blocks. Describes what the child did.Gives the child a chance to talk about what they have done.Validates the importance of the childs work.Builds childs vocabulary and knowledge in the content areas.36What would you say to a child who made this structure if you wanted toDescribes what the child did.Gives the child a chance to talk about what they have done.Validates the importance of the childs work.Builds childs vocabulary and knowledge in the content areas.

37What would you say to a child who made this structure if you wanted toDescribes what the child did.Gives the child a chance to talk about what they have done.Validates the importance of the childs work.Builds childs vocabulary and knowledge in the content areas.

I see you use one block that is longer than the other.Look, your blocks make a space in the middle.All of your blocks except one are touching.You used five blocks. You made the whole building with just five blocks.All your blocks are rectangles, but theyre not all the same size.38HandoutWhat Would You Say?39

40Build it from A to ZBuilding a HouseBuildings, buildings, buildingsChanges, changesThe Three PigsThe True Story of the 3 Little PigsLos tres pequenos jabalies/The Three Little JavelinasHouse Sweet House

Suggested Books 41Ways to Support ChildrenGet down on the floorHelp the child solve a problemDisplay and discuss picturesAdd new accessoriesAsk questions42The Teachers RoleObserving and Responding to Individual ChildrenInteracting With Children in the Block AreaFrequently Asked Questions About Blocks

43QUESTIONS ABOUT BLOCK PLAY

1.Some children never use the blocks. What should I do?

2.Should I allow children to bring materials from other areas (e.g., table blocks, telephones, hats, pinecones) into the Block Area?

3.Children dont want to spend time building because they know they have to take it down at clean-up time. What should I do?

4.How high should children be allowed to build?

5.Should I intervene when children use blocks as guns?Pages 267-268/260-26144Read silently.

Tell your table partners how this might be helpful.Pages 269/262A Letter to FamiliesAbout Block Play

45There are many ways to content, teaching and learning outdoors.

Outdoor play is essential for childrens health and well-being.46Computers, I Pads and Technology

Software level of child involvement47

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