Church History: American Restoration Movement

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Church History: American Restoration Movement. Surveying 1500 Years March 5, 2014. Rome. Introduction: understand the development of thought patterns as background for understanding the European Reformation Roman thinking was shaped by Greek thinking - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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Restoration History: Introduction

Church History: American Restoration MovementSurveying 1500 YearsMarch 5, 2014RomeIntroduction: understand the development of thought patterns as background for understanding the European ReformationRoman thinking was shaped by Greek thinkingThe absolute, universal value system of the Christians was a threatConstantine, 313 A.D., 381 A.D.Rome fell because it lacked a sufficient base upon which to build societyMiddle Ages~500 A.D. to 1400 A.D.Social, political and intellectual turmoilDeveloping concept of spirituality set aside realismDistortions of biblical teaching, increasing humanistic elementsMixing of the secular and the Christian, integration of church and stateQuestions of authority (state, church, Bible)Church-state conflicts led to limited, responsible governmentSyncretism of thought

RenaissanceRenaissance, rebirth, reached height in 14th, 15th, and 16th centuries, but roots are earlierPhilosophical changes with Aquinas (b. 1225)Plato and Aristotle contrastedPlato: absolutes-ideals, separated from the realHigher, God, grace, unseen, unity of universalsAristotle: real-particulars, individualLower, created, natural, visible, diversityFaith in man as capable of solving everything

Summary of Unresolved QuestionsThe possibility of an absolute, objective value system not based on the ability to think, observe, or experienceThe relationship between church and stateThe separation or integration of the spiritual (including the Bible) and the secular (including humanistic elements)The nature of the authority of the Bible (must it be mediated? through the church, or through human thought and analysis?)The alliance or conflict between philosophy and theologyThe church was slow to study itself and develop an ecclesiologyThe capacity or incapacity of humankind, and the related question of whether or to what extent human being participate or cooperate in salvation.

Church History: American Restoration MovementThe European Reformation: A SurveyMarch 12, 2014Summary of Unresolved QuestionsThe possibility of an absolute, objective value system not based on the ability to think, observe, or experienceThe relationship between church and stateThe separation or integration of the spiritual (including the Bible) and the secular (including humanistic elements)The nature of the authority of the Bible (must it be mediated? through the church, or through human thought and analysis?)The alliance or conflict between philosophy and theologyThe church was slow to study itself and develop an ecclesiologyThe capacity or incapacity of humankind, and the related question of whether or to what extent human being participate or cooperate in salvation.

ReformationRenaissance OR Reformation? Two answers to same problemcapable or incapable man?Contributions of Wycliffe, Huss, LutherPositives of the ReformationBible has authorityCannot begin with or depend on mankindSome awareness of biblical distortionsNegatives of the ReformationReformation branches: Luther, Calvin (Zwingli, Knox), Anglicans, Radical-Anabaptists, Spiritualists)PoliticsReturn to Bible brought political freedomA moral base provided freedom without chaosGovernment is not arbitrarySamuel Rutherford, Lex RexJohn WitherspoonJohn LockeSociety is judged by an external, objective standard

EnlightenmentMerriam-Webster: a movement of the 18th century that stressed the belief that science and logic give people more knowledge and understanding than tradition and religion

Church History: American Restoration MovementEarly U.S. church historyEarly Restoration longings and efforts

March 26, 2014Summary of Unresolved QuestionsThe possibility of an absolute, objective value system not based on the ability to think, observe, or experienceThe relationship between church and stateThe separation or integration of the spiritual (including the Bible) and the secular (including humanistic elements)The nature of the authority of the Bible (must it be mediated? through the church, or through human thought and analysis?)The alliance or conflict between philosophy and theologyThe church was slow to study itself and develop an ecclesiologyThe capacity or incapacity of humankind, and the related question of whether or to what extent human being participate or cooperate in salvation.

The Early American ContextAn English settlementPredominantly ProtestantTransplanted churchesIncreasing importance of the laityBreakdown of parish systemIncreasing focus on preachingThe Great AwakeningLocally autonomous churchesRevivalism naturally conflicts with CalvinismHead/heart: changed beliefs or changed livesChallenges to authorityUnity valueddistinctions renouncedSecond Great AwakeningCivic religionGreat waves of revivalsThe theological dividing pointPresbyterian secessions

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