AC motor.pdf

  • View
    222

  • Download
    0

Embed Size (px)

Text of AC motor.pdf

  • 8/17/2019 AC motor.pdf

    1/19

    Induction motor

    Construction

    • Stator + Rotor

     Stator   circuit

      has

      three

      sets

      of 

      coils

      which

      are

     separated by 120o and are excited by a three‐ phase power supply. 

    • The rotor circuit is also composed of  three‐ phase windings that are shorted internally  (within the rotor structure) or externally  (through slip rings and brushes)

    • Rotor has two types: squirrel cage rotor and 

    wound   rotor

  • 8/17/2019 AC motor.pdf

    2/19

    Rotating  

    magnetic  

    field

     Stator   is

      supply

      by

      a   balanced

      three

      phase

      system

    Flux  

    direction

  • 8/17/2019 AC motor.pdf

    3/19

    Flux  

    equation

     At   time

      t1

    • At time t2

     At  

    time  

    t3

    Some  

    important  

    equation

    • Synchronous speed 

    •   Ns is the synchronous speed 

    •   F is the frequency

    •   PP is the number of  pairs of  pole

    •   P is the number of  poles

    • Slip  ‐   S is slip. S is between 0 and 1

    ‐   Ns

      is

      the

      synchronous

      speed

    ‐   N is the mechanical speed ‐

  • 8/17/2019 AC motor.pdf

    4/19

    Equivalent  

    circuit  

    of   

    induction  

    motor

    ‐ R1: stator resistance

    ‐  X1:

      stator

      reactance

     

    ‐ Rm and Xm: represent 

    the core of  the motor

    ‐ E1: is the voltage of  the 

    source minus the voltage 

    drop on the stator

    ‐ N1:N2 is the equivalent 

    number of  turns of  stator 

    comparing   to

      that

      of 

      rotor

    ‐ R2: rotor resistance

    ‐ X2: rotor reactance 

    ‐ S: slip

    Equivalent  

    circuit  

    of   

    induction  

    motor

  • 8/17/2019 AC motor.pdf

    5/19

    More  

    equivalent  

    circuit  

    of   

    induction  

    motor

    Power  

    flow

  • 8/17/2019 AC motor.pdf

    6/19

    Power  

    flow

    Example

    •  A 50 hp, 60 Hz, three‐phase, Y‐connected induction motor operates  at full load at a speed of  1764 rpm. The rotational losses of  the motor  are

      950W,

      the

      stator

      copper

      losses

      are

      1.6

      kW,

      and

      the

      iron

      losses

      are

     

    1.2 kW. Compare the motor efficiency? 

  • 8/17/2019 AC motor.pdf

    7/19

    Torque  

    characteristics

    More  

    regions  

    of   

    torque  

    characteristics

    • Large slip region

    • Starting torque 

  • 8/17/2019 AC motor.pdf

    8/19

    More  

    regions  

    of   

    torque  

    characteristics

     Small   slip

      region

    • Slip at maximum torque

    Example

    •  A 50 hp, 440 V, 60 Hz, three‐phase, four‐pole induction motor  develops a maximum torque of  250% at slip of  10%. Ignore the stator  resistance

      and

      rotational

      losses.

      Calculate

      the

      following

    • Speed of  the motor at full load

    • Copper losses of  the rotor

    • Starting torque of  the motor

  • 8/17/2019 AC motor.pdf

    9/19

    Starting  

    procedure

    Starting  

    procedure

  • 8/17/2019 AC motor.pdf

    10/19

    Example 

     An   induction

      motor

      has

      a   stator

      resistance

      of 

      3   Ohm,

      and

      the

      rotor

     resistance referred to the stator is 2 Ohm. The equivalent inductive  reactance Xeq=10 Ohm. Calculate the change in the starting torque if   the voltage is reduced by 10%. Also, compute the resistance that  should be added to the rotor circuit to achieve the maximum torque  at starting. 

    Speed  

    control  

    of   

    induction  

    motor

    •   Armature or rotor resistance 

    •   Armature or rotor inductance 

    •  Magnitude of  terminal voltage

    •  Frequency of  terminal voltage 

    •   Voltage/Frequency control 

    •  Rotor voltage injection

    •  Slip energy recovery

  • 8/17/2019 AC motor.pdf

    11/19

    Controlling  

    speed  

    by  

    using  

    rotor  

    resistance

     In   steady

      state

      condition,

      the

      motor

      operates

      near

      the

      synchronous

     speed. Hence, small slip region. 

    Controlling speed by using rotor resistance

    •  Consequences of  change in rotor resistance

    •   The synchronous speed does not change

    •   The maximum torque does not change 

    •   The slip at maximum torque change

    •   With the increase in rotor resistance, the starting torque decreases

    •  Inconveniences 

    •   Small range of  speed variation (i.e speed change from position 1 to position 2  at torque T1)

  • 8/17/2019 AC motor.pdf

    12/19

    Example

     A   three

      phase,

      Y   connected,

      30

      hp (rated

      output),

      480

      V,

      six

      pole,

      60

     Hz, slip ring induction motor has a stator resistance R1=0.5 Ohm and  a rotor resistance referred to stator R’2=0.5 Ohm. The rotational  losses are 500 W and the core losses are 600 W. Assume that the  change in the rotational losses due to the change in speed is minor.  The motor load is a constant‐torque type. 

    •   At full load torque, calculate the speed of  the motor? 

    •  Calculate the added resistance to the rotor circuit needed to reduce the  speed by 20%? 

     Calculate  

    the  

    motor  

    efficiency  

    without  

    and  

    with  

    the  

    added  

    resistance?  

    •   If  the cost of  energy is 0.05 USD/kWh, compute the annual cost of  operating  the motor continuously with the added resistance. Assume that the motor  operates 100 hours a week. 

    Controlling speed using inductance

    •  Adding inductance to the motor windings is an unrealistic option for  the following reasons: 

    •   The physical size of  the inductance required t make a sizable change in speed  is likely to be larger than the motor itself.

    •   Variable inductance requires expensive and elaborate design

    •   The insertion of  inductance reduce the starting torque

    •   The insertion of  inductance consumes reactive power that further lowers the  already low power factor of  induction motor 

  • 8/17/2019 AC motor.pdf

    13/19

    Controlling speed by adjusting the stator  voltage 

    Controlling speed by adjusting the stator  voltage 

    •  The torque of  the motor is proportional to the square of  its stator  voltage 

    • Synchronous speed does not change 

    • Decreasing stator voltage will decrease also the starting torque

    • Slip at maximum torque does not move

  • 8/17/2019 AC motor.pdf

    14/19

    Example 

     For   the

      motor

      given

      in

      the

      above

      example,

      assume

      that

      the

      load

     torque is constant and equal to 120 Nm. Ignore the rotational losses  and calculate the motor speed at full voltage. Repeat the  computation if  the voltage is reduced by 20%. 

    Controlling speed by adjusting the supply  frequency 

    • Synchronous speed 

  • 8/17/2019 AC motor.pdf

    15/19

    Controlling speed by adjusting the supply  frequency 

     Decreasing   the

      frequency

      increases

      in

      return

      the

      starting

      current

    Effects  

    of   

    excessively  

    high  

    frequency

    • An increase in the no‐load speed 

     A   decrease

      in

      the

      maximum

      torque

  • 8/17/2019 AC motor.pdf

    16/19

Search related