Film production guide

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Text of Film production guide

  • MATCH ON ACTION
    • A match on action , a technique used in film editing , is a cut that connects two different views of the same action at the same moment in the movement. By carefully matching the movement across the two shots , filmmakers make it seem that the motion continues uninterrupted. For a real match on action, the action should begin in the first shot and end in the second shot.
    • The match on action is a very valuable technique in continuity editing , a style of film editing that emphasizes clear spatial relationships between objects in a scene. By seeing the same movement beginning and ending in two consecutive, differently framed shots, spectators will easily interpret the space around the action as a continuous whole. Matching on action can help reduce the visual choppiness inherent in cutting .
    • http://classes.yale.edu/film-analysis/htmfiles/editing.htm
  • SHOT REVERSE SHOT
    • Conventional technique of cinematography and editing for the filming of dialogue. In the classic shot/reverse shot sequence, the camera frames each speaker (usually 2-4) in medium close-up as he or she recites a line of dialogue. The shoulder or profile of the listener can often be seen, slightly out of focus on the edge of the frame, while the camera is focused on the face of the speaker.
    • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=chAUgK4bwJo
  • The 180-degree rule
    • A cinematographic technique which states that the camera must remain on the same side of an imaginary line, perpendicular to the camera's viewpoint, from which the establishing shot is taken. The 180 degree rule is an important element of the continuity style.
    • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HdyyuqmCW14
  • AUDIENCE PLANNING WORKING TO A SCHEDULE FILMING EDITING STORYLINE GENRE ANALYSIS OF EXISTING PRODUCTS CODES & CONVENTIONS STORYBOARDS RECONNAISSANCE NARRATIVE IMAGE SOUNDTRACK challenging forms and conventions representing particular social groups What kind of media institution might distribute your media product and why? Who would be the audience? How did you attract/address your audience? What have you learnt about technologies? MEETINGS Skills and knowledge progression from preliminary task ENIGMAS BRAND IDENTITY (PRODUCTION LOGO) ROLES & RESPONSIBILITIES ORGANISATION KEEPING RECORDS & NOTE TAKING MEETING DEADLINES THERE ARE HYPERLINKS ON PAGE PROPOSAL CO-OPERATION
  • RESEARCH and PLANNING
    • This section includes many things, such as organisation, smooth running of the project, efficient use of resources (e.g. using a shooting script to be sure actors are called for the required times only) and attention to detail (e.g. making sure costumes and props are consistent from scene to scene). An important aspect of this is the evidence that the product was planned. For moving image or time-based projects a storyboard and possibly a script as well as shooting script, schedules, prop and costume lists, etc should be included.
    • Given that this mark is awarded by the teacher based on observation and discussion, the more information and documentation available to support the mark awarded, the easier it is to uphold the teachers mark. It is far harder for moderators to support a teachers marks if there is no documentation, evidence or explanation regarding the mark awarded.
    • TICK LIST: http://www.slideshare.net/belair1981/foundation-portfolio-requirements-tick-list
  • RESEARCH (BACK TO PAGE 10)
    • 3 genre film case studies (the genre should be Thiller as was chosen for your fiction film opening):
    • These are mini case studies on 1 particular extract (not the titles) from a genre film, set out in bullet point form you must detail how the chosen extract from the film uses all the genres codes and conventions (setting, characters, style etc) and the effect they have.
    • For example
    • Scream Wes Craven (1996) The Opening
      • The Setting: in this extract the setting is very remote, isolated from everywhere, anticipating suspecting tension; also connotes the fact that if there was an emergency no one would be able to help. Mise-en-scene conventions that are frequently seen in horror films are used in this extract, the use of the interior of the house, making the familiar place, a safe place i.e. the home one that becomes a dangerous place to be, a threatening place to be.
    • You would then do the same for the other genre conventions, follow this format for both case studies. Completing this task will show that you have researched and gained knowledge of the chosen genre you want to work in.
    • HANDOUT: http://www.slideshare.net/belair1981/genre-elements
  • RESEARCH (BACK TO PAGE 10)
    • General research into title sequences (codes, conventions, purpose)
    • Provide evidence that you know what the purpose is of titles and opening sequences and the various kinds that you can get.
    • For example they can be used as a prologue much like the titles for The Incredible Hulk (2008) http://www.artofthetitle.com/2009/05/18/the-incredible-hulk/
    • Or they can be quite simple and set up the universal theme of the film check out Love Actually (2003) http://love-actually-07.xanga.com/videos/f632b314434/
    • Also look at single take titles http://www.artofthetitle.com/2009/11/16/single-take-titles-part-2-the-individual/
    • Typically, an opening sequence will contain:
    • Details of cast and crew.
    • The film's title.
    • An introduction to character or character type.
    • Indication of place.
    • Indication of historical period.
    • Information regarding mood and tone.
    • Introduction to signature theme tune.
    • Information about genre.
    • Questions that the viewer finds intriguing (sets up enigmas)
    • Patterns and types of editing that will be echoed in the remainder of the film.
    • Mise en scene and cinematography that will be echoed or elaborated upon later in the film.
  • RESEARCH
    • Analysis of contemporary titles/opening vs. older titles/opening
    • Title sequences have come a long way, many have said the Kyle Cooper broke the mould and reinvented the title sequence with his seminal piece for David Finchers Seven (1995) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SEZK7mJoPLY
    • So what makes title sequences post Seven stand out so much from those pre Seven?
    • Look at these:
    • To Kill a Mocking Bird (1962) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rP5MutuPVxk&feature=PlayList&p=C4DBAEE344BA4C5A
    • Dr. Strangelove (1964) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qs7EikHQGlA&feature=PlayList&p=C4DBAEE344BA4C5A&index=10
    • Vertigo (1958) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pz46qS38OgM&feature=PlayList&p=C4DBAEE344BA4C5A&index=14
    • American Psycho (2000) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-bXESFT2sRQ&feature=PlayList&p=C4DBAEE344BA4C5A
  • PLANNING
    • Production Brief A brief outline plan for project
    • Project name:
    • Length:
    • Deadline:
    • Group members & their roles:
    • Brief overview of content (approx 50 words):
    • Target audience (age group, gender bias (if any), socio-economic status and lifestyle profiling):
    • What comparable products have you researched?
    • What is the rationale behind this text?
    • What representations will be operating in your text? Are these justified?
    • How will you test whether the product is successful? How will you check that it accomplishes the intended effect?
    • What generic codes and conventions will be operating in your text?
    • What are the overt (obvious) messages incorporated into the text?
    • Are there any (hidden) messages incorporated into the text?
    • Identify any resource constraints (time, money, equipment, human resources) that might affect your production and your hopes for your product:
    • Additional notes:
    • EXAMPLE: http://www.slideshare.net/belair1981/producttion-brief-example
  • PLANNING
    • Treatment A treatment is an outline of your initial ideas. It will help you to:
    • prepare you for writing your Evaluation
    • help you to organise what you have to do
    • remind you of how you work explores media concepts
    • be more precise about what you want to explore and achieve
  • PLANNING: TREATMENT (BACK TO PAGE 10)
    • PRODUCT What is the product? Include an outline of the overall marketing campaign
    • TARGET AUDIENCE You must be precise about this as it leads to all your decisions about the final product. Be precise about age, lifestyle, sex, attitudes/beliefs, interests. How do want them to respond to your product? How are you going to make it appeal to them