Latest Global Educational Management Trends

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  • Cebu

    Cagayan De Oro Nov 18-20 2016 Dec 9-11 2016 Details: call / text 09175147952

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  • Your name please..,& Why are you here?

  • New Definitions of Success1.Rethinking Measurements2. Student-Centered Environments3. Personalized Professional Development4. Managing Change5. Data Informed Decisions + World-Class Standards6. Balanced Approaches: Asking To What End7.Programming, Robotics and the Maker Movement8.Neuroscience, Youth Development Research and how Kids Learn Best9.Mobile Learning10.Cloud Computing Course Outline Introduction Global Trends and Changes shaping the future of K-12 Education with online learning as mainstream, blended learning and education systems Shift.Latest Global Educational Management Trends

  • 1.The Use of the Internet and Social Media as a Teaching Tool2.Students Teaching Teachers3.Paying Close Attention to Each Students' Needs4. Better Assessment Methods5. Personalized Learning Experiences6. Flipped Learning7. Cloud Technologies8. Gamification

    Course OutlineRecent Trends in K-12 Education As our education system eventually become mainstream in the classroom , finding the most effective ways to help students succeed in school all in the face of tighter budgets and larger classroom sizes.

  • To equip teachers to digitally empower diverse learners to connect, communicate and collaborate by creating a rich environment indulging technology in the classroom to help them evolve. To facilitate learningin a more impactful manner by integrating technology to help make the world a smaller place with interaction beyond the classroom and classmate to virtual trips and multi-region and multi-nation interactivity to commence projects and work.Goal / Purpose

    School Performance (quality of instruction ) Students Achievements (equity in areas of student participation including the poorest sector society) *

  • - giving flexibility to redesign student centered learning in a more flexibleK-12 education and aligning to the system to set high expectations and close achievement gaps.Bridging the range of project-based learning opportunities within phenomenon-based curriculum redesign, relevant and meaningful to students and their communities by:- - rethinking accountability for new learning models to modernize educators and leadership development to implement personalized learning and invest in research on the digital equity gap.

    gives states flexibility to redesign assessments for student centered learning, to rethink accountability for new learning models, and to modernize educator and leadership development. It also provides funding to states and districts to implement personalized learning and invests in research on the digital equity gap.*

  • Online learning will hit the mainstream as K-12 education systems leverage technology to increase access to educational opportunities and seek improved equity. Blended learning continues to dramatically change instructional models by providing real-time, data-driven instruction and opening up multiple pathways for students to learn.

  • However, the biggest shift will be driven by education systems moving toward personalization for each students unique needs, interests, passions and competency-based pathways.Redefining success for students takes center stage as education leaders and practitioners ask communities what a meaningful high school diploma looks like for students and the workforce

  • Investing in research to bridge the digital equity gap.

  • New Definitions of SuccessNew Definitions of Success-including knowledge, skills, social emotional intelligence and important dispositions for future success. This requires rethinking the importance of student work evidence, bridging informal and formal learning, student exhibitions and portfolios.

  • Emotional Intelligence refers to a set of emotional and social skills and competencies that influence the way we perceive and express ourselves;

    develop and maintain social relationships; cope with challenges; and use the information in emotions in effective and meaningful ways.Emotional Intelligence in New Definition of Success

  • Educators and community leaders work together to bridge the range of meaningful project-based learning opportunities across education and communities within,..phenomenon-based curriculum redesign, which is relevant and meaningful to students and their communities.New Definitions of Success

    In Phenomenon Based Learning (PhenoBL) and teaching, holistic real-world phenomena provide the starting point for learning. The phenomena are studied as complete entities, in their real context, and the information and skills related to them are studied by crossing the boundaries between subjects.Phenomena are holistic topics likehuman, European Union, media and technology, waterorenergy.The starting point differs from the traditional school culture divided into subjects, where the things studied are often split into relatively small, separate parts (decontextualisation).

    Phenomenon-based structure in a curriculum also actively creates better opportunities for integrating different subjects and themes as well as the systematic use of pedagogically meaningful methods, such as inquiry learning, problem-based learning, project learning and portfolios. The phenomenon-based approach is also key in the versatile utilisation of different learning environments (e.g. in diversifying and enriching learning while using eLearning environments).*

  • Phenomenon-based Learning (PhenoBL) In PhenoBL, holistic real-world phenomena provide the starting point for learning. The phenomena are studied as complete entities, in their real context, and the information and skills related to them are studied by crossing the boundaries between subjects.

    Phenomenon-based structure in a curriculum also actively creates better opportunities for integrating different subjects and themes as well as the systematic use of pedagogically meaningful methods, such as inquiry learning, problem-based learning, project learning and portfolios. The phenomenon-based approach is also key in the versatile utilisation of different learning environments (e.g. in diversifying and enriching learning while using eLearning environments).*

  • The starting point differs from the traditional school culture divided into subjects, where the things studied are often split into relatively small, separate parts (decontextualisation).Phenomena are holistic topics likehuman, media and technology, waterorenergy.

    Phenomenon-based structure in a curriculum also actively creates better opportunities for integrating different subjects and themes as well as the systematic use of pedagogically meaningful methods, such as inquiry learning, problem-based learning, project learning and portfolios. The phenomenon-based approach is also key in the versatile utilisation of different learning environments (e.g. in diversifying and enriching learning while using eLearning environments).*

  • 1. Rethinking MeasurementsEducation systems begin to rethink addressing every students needs upon entry and benchmarking, as well as taking gateway measurements and exit exams more aligned to student needs. Systems realize they need to design around not yet proficient students at every step of an academic career, while offering stronger student supports and educator supports in reaching success.

  • This drives the need for systemic changes that cross between education, social services and greater connectivism to communities needs. New definitions of student success, including a broader conceptualization of evidence of student mastery, to include;project-based learning with student exhibitions and redefining what success looks like at graduation.

  • Take 5!

    Have you ever attended a Seminar and seen groups of teachers leave in the middle? It's painful to watch, yet completely understandable. Often, they leave because the session was not what they expected.

    *

  • Student-Centered Learning: It Starts With the TeacherQuestion:When teachers and/or administrators attend learning experiences, what is the one non-negotiable expectation - without which the session failed?Answer: Leaving with skills and strategies that can be used immediately to impact instruction and work-related responsibilities.

    *

  • Achieving this goal means understanding what the participants value, and engaging them in those areas. Effective professional development caters to what teachers think will help them become more effective. Likewise the students. The learners may not be allowed to leave the classroom when the instruction doesn't involve them, but there are many other ways that they check out.

  • Student-centered classrooms include students in planning, implementation, and assessments. Involving the learners in these decisions will place more work on them, which can be a good thing. 2. Student-Centered