of 8 /8
at Naropa University April 15, 2010 The Sycamore Vol. I No. 2 www.thesycamore.org U.S. Congressman Jared Polis, represent- ing the 2nd District in Colorado, will be speaking at Naropa University on April 19th in the Performing Arts Cen- ter (PAC) on the Arapahoe Campus. Congressman Polis, who serves on the Education and Labor Committee as well as the Rules Committee, discussed in a phone interview with The Sycamore his priorities as they related to education policy. “Education is my focus and concern,” Congressman Polis said. Speaking to specific policy items, the Congressman noted pending modifications to the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) of 2001 as critical to improving education policy. NCLB, which will be voted on for reautho- rization in 2011, is undergoing revisions in committee. According to Congressman Polis, the “Blue Print” plan released by the Obama administration places an emphasis on “improving other areas in addition to math and science,” which Polis supports. Congressman Polis further noted the im- portance of “increasing diversity” within the career fields related to math and sci- ence. “If you look at the field of com- puter science as an example, you’ll see that it is dominated by men,” Polis said. Cover art by Rika Rossing ‘12 Naropa University is unlike most colleges and universities in the United States. How- ever, our unique mission does not exempt our institution from failing to model the best practices of administrative accountability. The alleged embezzlement of nearly a half-million dollars in University funds by former Accounts Payable Clerk, Ronda Devers, highlights more than a tragic event in Naropa’s history. This situation is telling of a larger problem in which the necessary protocols of due diligence and ad- ministrative oversight are seriously lacking. Both President Lord and the Higher Learning Commission (HLC) agree that Naropa’s sus- tainability requires drastic improvements in both administrative efficiency and budgetary structure. However, budget reductions alone will not suffice in addressing the systemic weak- nesses that pervades our beloved university. We cannot ignore the reality that for at least the past two years responsible offices through- out the University were derelict in performing their duties. This is underscored by the fact that it was the FBI who approached the ad- ministration, and not the other way around. Though the swords have rightfully fallen on Ms. Sue Evans, retired VP of Finance and Busi- ness Administration and Ms. Suree Chounla- mountry, former Comptroller, firings alone will not solve Naropa’s systemic problems. The University must prove to the community that the underlying structural failures that gave rise to the alleged fraud are being radi- cally changed. We need to be assured that the administration, after failing to notice $450,000 in suspected theft, operates on a higher level of oversight and efficiency. Remembering that ours is an institution that is largely financed by tuition dollars paid by students and parents, and not through donations or an endowment, a lack of confidence by these key constitu- encies is something Naropa cannot afford. We respect that the Lord administration has publicly acknowledged the existence of severe structural issues in the University surrounding a “lack of accountability standards.” Further, we understand that the FBI investigation is ongoing, and therefore the administration cannot speak to specific details. But ours is not a call for details. Rather, we demand assurance that new accountability mea- sures and due diligence protocols have been duly implemented and are being followed. Contact The Sycamore at: [email protected] On Accountability Editorial Board Congressman Polis Will Speak at Naropa Mohammad Usman Editor-in-Chief Continued on page 2 Naropa Students Work on Urban Farm in Lower Ninth Ward over Spring Break On the morning of March 22nd, after 30 hours of road time and snow all the way through Texas, eleven Naropa students ar- rived at Our School Blair Grocery in the Lower Ninth Ward to serve and to learn. Over the course of three years Steve Blaes, one of Naropa’s former landscap- ers, organized the trip. Housing and travel expenses were financed by students with word of reimbursement from the Com- munity Studies Department, although said reimbursement has yet to be delivered. The students’ first task was to remove weeds in the New Orleans Vietnamese Village where Blair Grocery is partnering with the Mary Queen Congregation’s Urban Farm project. This urban farm school was founded by Nat Turner and managed by Brennan Dough- erty, who provided the Naropa students with their site. This was one of the many sites provided along with Brennan’s working knowledge of the New Orleans community. In exchange for volunteer labor, Mary Queen is letting Blair Grocery use a portion of the land for their compost. In the afternoons, the Naropa students reconvened at Blair Gro- cery from their various different work sites. The neighborhood children congregated at Blair Grocery for the after-school programs “The kids are amazing!” said Jen Lukas, a Naropa student in the Environmental Lead- ership Graduate program. She spoke specifi- cally of her experience with one girl about the age of 12, “I fell completely in love with her confidence, passion, and curiosity. She’s hop- ing to attend Juilliard some day for theater.” These connections happened without much prompting. The neighborhood chil- dren were curious about what the Naropa students were doing in the gardens. A few were eager to play a basketball game out front and others joined Naropa students in painting signs. These signs were go- ing to go on the Viet Village fence to pre- vent dumping and trespassing on the lot. Compost at Blair Grocery, consisting of Whole Food’s daily food compost and a local landscaping company’s three-year-old mulch, is crucial. There is little to no food security in the Lower Ninth Ward. The ground there consists of clay, concrete and tarmac rem- nants, none of which are ideal for a garden to feed potentially 3,000 people. Nat Turn- er’s goal is to provide for this approximate number of people who have returned to the area that was once inhabited by 18,000. The Lower Ninth Ward was and is the part of New Orleans most devastated by Hur- ricane Katrina. Gutted homes await pur- chasers if the original residents have not shown intent to rebuild. There are some homes in the process of being improved but many of their neighbors are con- crete slabs. Few jobs exist in the Lower Ninth Ward, and to commute anywhere one has to travel over the Industrial Canal. Lora Fike Staff Writer Students Serve in the Gulf Coast Continued on page 2 FEATURE

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atNaropaUniversityApril15,2010

TheSycamoreVol.INo.2

www.thesycamore.org

U.S. Congressman Jared Polis, represent-ing the 2nd District in Colorado, willbe speaking at Naropa University onApril 19th in the Performing Arts Cen-ter (PAC) on the Arapahoe Campus.

Congressman Polis, who serves on theEducation and Labor Committee as wellas the Rules Committee, discussed in aphone interview with The Sycamore hisprioritiesastheyrelatedtoeducationpolicy.

“Education is my focus and concern,”Congressman Polis said. Speaking tospecific policy items, the Congressmannoted pending modifications to the NoChild Left Behind Act (NCLB) of 2001as critical to improving education policy.NCLB,whichwillbevotedonforreautho-rization in 2011, is undergoing revisionsin committee. According to CongressmanPolis,the“BluePrint”planreleasedbytheObama administration places an emphasison “improving other areas in addition tomath and science,” which Polis supports.

Congressman Polis further noted the im-portance of “increasing diversity” withinthe career fields related to math and sci-ence. “If you look at the field of com-puter science as an example, you’ll seethat it is dominated by men,” Polis said.

CoverartbyRikaRossing‘12

Naropa University is unlike most collegesanduniversities in theUnitedStates.How-ever, our uniquemission does not exemptourinstitutionfromfailingtomodelthebestpractices of administrative accountability.

The alleged embezzlement of nearly ahalf-million dollars in University funds byformer Accounts Payable Clerk, RondaDevers, highlights more than a tragicevent in Naropa’s history. This situationis telling of a larger problem inwhich thenecessaryprotocolsofduediligenceandad-ministrative oversight are seriously lacking.

BothPresidentLordandtheHigherLearningCommission(HLC)agreethatNaropa’ssus-tainability requiresdrastic improvements inbothadministrativeefficiencyandbudgetarystructure.However,budgetreductionsalonewillnotsufficeinaddressingthesystemicweak-nessesthatpervadesourbeloveduniversity.Wecannotignoretherealitythatforatleastthepasttwoyearsresponsibleofficesthrough-outtheUniversitywerederelictinperformingtheirduties.ThisisunderscoredbythefactthatitwastheFBIwhoapproachedthead-ministration,andnottheotherwayaround.

ThoughtheswordshaverightfullyfallenonMs.SueEvans,retiredVPofFinanceandBusi-nessAdministrationandMs.SureeChounla-mountry, formerComptroller, firingsalonewillnot solveNaropa’s systemicproblems.

TheUniversitymustprovetothecommunitythat the underlying structural failures thatgaverisetotheallegedfraudarebeingradi-callychanged.Weneedtobeassuredthattheadministration,afterfailingtonotice$450,000insuspectedtheft,operatesonahigherlevelofoversightandefficiency.Rememberingthatoursisaninstitutionthatislargelyfinancedbytuitiondollarspaidbystudentsandparents,andnotthroughdonationsoranendowment,a lackofconfidenceby thesekeyconstitu-encies is somethingNaropa cannot afford.

WerespectthattheLordadministrationhaspubliclyacknowledgedtheexistenceofseverestructuralissuesintheUniversitysurroundinga“lackofaccountabilitystandards.”Further,weunderstandthat theFBI investigation isongoing, and therefore the administrationcannot speak to specific details. But oursisnotacall fordetails.Rather,wedemandassurance that new accountability mea-suresandduediligenceprotocolshavebeenduly implemented and are being followed.

Contact The Sycamore at: [email protected]

OnAccountability

Editorial Board

Cong r e s smanPolisWill SpeakatNaropaMohammad UsmanEditor-in-Chief

Continued on page 2

Naropa Students Work on Urban Farmin Lower Ninth Ward over Spring Break

On the morning of March 22nd, after 30hours of road time and snow all the waythrough Texas, elevenNaropa students ar-rived at Our School Blair Grocery in theLower Ninth Ward to serve and to learn.Over the course of three years SteveBlaes, one of Naropa’s former landscap-ers, organized the trip. Housing and travelexpenses were financed by students with

word of reimbursement from the Com-munity Studies Department, although saidreimbursement has yet to be delivered.

Thestudents’firsttaskwastoremoveweedsintheNewOrleansVietnameseVillagewhereBlair Grocery is partnering with the MaryQueenCongregation’sUrbanFarmproject.ThisurbanfarmschoolwasfoundedbyNatTurner and managed by Brennan Dough-erty, who provided the Naropa studentswith their site. This was one of themanysitesprovidedalongwithBrennan’sworkingknowledgeof theNewOrleanscommunity.

Inexchangeforvolunteerlabor,MaryQueenislettingBlairGroceryuseaportionof thelandfortheircompost.Intheafternoons,theNaropa students reconvened at Blair Gro-ceryfromtheirvariousdifferentworksites.The neighborhood children congregated atBlairGroceryfortheafter-schoolprograms

“The kids are amazing!” said Jen Lukas, aNaropastudentintheEnvironmentalLead-ershipGraduateprogram.Shespokespecifi-callyof herexperiencewithonegirlabouttheageof 12,“Ifellcompletelyinlovewithherconfidence,passion,andcuriosity.She’shop-ingtoattendJuilliardsomedayfortheater.”

These connections happened withoutmuch prompting. The neighborhood chil-dren were curious about what the Naropastudentswere doing in the gardens.A fewwere eager to play a basketball game outfront and others joined Naropa studentsin painting signs. These signs were go-ing togoon theVietVillage fence topre-vent dumping and trespassing on the lot.

Compost at Blair Grocery, consisting of WholeFood’sdailyfoodcompostandalocallandscapingcompany’sthree-year-oldmulch,iscrucial.ThereislittletonofoodsecurityintheLowerNinthWard.Thegroundthereconsists of clay, concrete and tarmac rem-nants,noneof whichareidealforagardento feedpotentially3,000people.NatTurn-er’s goal is toprovide for this approximatenumber of people who have returned totheareathatwasonceinhabitedby18,000.

TheLowerNinthWardwasandisthepartof NewOrleans most devastated by Hur-ricane Katrina. Gutted homes await pur-chasers if the original residents have notshown intent to rebuild. There are somehomes in the process of being improvedbut many of their neighbors are con-crete slabs. Few jobs exist in the LowerNinth Ward, and to commute anywhereonehas to travelover the IndustrialCanal.

Lora FikeStaffWriter

Students Serve in the Gulf Coast

Continued on page 2

FEATURE

Page 2: The Sycamore Issue 2

April 15, 2010Page2 TheSycamore

NEWS

The FBI investigation of the alleged em-bezzlement of approximately $450,000in university funds remains ongoing.

Since President Stuart Lord announced thesuspected fraud to thecommunityonMarch29,theuniversityhasnotcommentedfurtheronthematterbecauseof thependinginvesti-gation,officialsinvolvedinthesituationnoted.

The employee who allegedly conductedthe embezzlement, former Accounts Pay-able Clerk Ms. Ronda Devers, was fired.

Two other top-level administrators, VPof Business and Finance, Sue Evans andUniversity Comptroller, Suree Chounla-mountry were also fired in conjunctionwith the case. In his exclusive interview

with The Sycamore, President Lord notedthat there would not be any more employ-ees terminated in relation to this situation.

According to the President, the Uni-versity has implemented stronger con-trols, policies, and systems of evaluationin order to safeguard university funds.

PresidentLordfurtheraddedthattheongoinglegalprocesswilltaketimeandthattheuniver-sitywill“co-cooperatefullywithlawenforce-ment.”ThePresidentdidnotethattheuniversitywouldprosecutetothefullestextentof thelaw.

In conclusion, the President said that thissituationprovided theopportunity forNaro-pa University to become a stronger institu-tion. The university cannot “move back-wards, but forward” andwith greater clarity.

PolisDiscussesEducationalReforms

Turningtootherlegislationrelatedtohigh-er education, Congressman Polis spokeof theDreamAct, an act included in theHouse bill on Immigration Reform thatwould allow individuals who are undocu-mented,buthavecompletedhighschoolintheU.S.,toattendcollegewithouthavingtopayout-of-statetuitionrates.“Youngpeo-plewhoareundocumentedshouldnotbepricedoutof attendingcollege,”Polissaid.

Asked whether the Dream Act would beable to pass through the Senate, wherethe Democrats lack a filibuster-proof majority, the Congressman said, “Thelegislation has bi-partisan support.”

In terms of public service, an issue of special relevance to the Naropa com-munity, Congressman Polis cited theService America Act of 2009 as impor-tant because it provides “young peoplewith summer service opportunities.”

AtNaropa the importanceof servicehasbeen echoed by President Stuart Lord aswell as other senior administrators. TheUniversity held its official “Day of Ser-vice andLearning”back inOctober2009as part of the President’s Inauguration.

Acknowledging the relationship betweenformal education and service, Congress-manPolisnoted that, “service is a criticalpart of education.” He further added,“[Service] provides young people withbetter job prospects,” referring to theexperience it affords college students.

Concluding his interview, Congress-man Polis expressed his excitement tospeak before the Naropa community.

TheCongressmanwillspeaktotheNaropacommunityinPAConMonday,April19th.

Prior to Katrina, there were three bridg-esoutof the area.Now there isonly theClaiborne Avenue Bridge. Legally, thisbridge is to be up for only nine minutesat a time in case of an emergency.Whileour studentswere there, they experiencedwaitingforthebridgetocomebackdownforfifteenminutestoahalf anhour.Cou-pledwith limitedreopeningof busroutesand the fact that 32% of the populationlack access to a vehicle, this is a difficultspace to navigate on a number of levels.

There is no grocery store in the LowerNinth Ward, the nearest one being threemiles away. This makes Blair Grocerya vital component to the community.Brennan and her colleagues sell their lo-cal organic produce at affordable prices

on Sundays at a host of local churches.They also speak at the churches aboutfood security and sustainable living.

When asked about the relevance of this trip to her academic and personallife, Jen Lukas said “I wanted to see itfor myself: to see how far, or short, thearea had come in four and a half years.”

This trip to New Orleans, with the ex-ception of the Poverty Matters’ coursetrip to Nicaragua, was the only alterna-tive spring break trip available toNaropastudents this year. Steve Blaes movedback to Baltimore, Maryland follow-ing his return to Boulder.Hewill not bearoundtoorganizethistripfora4thyear.

CourtesyofNaropaUniversity

Service Trips May Not Reoccur

Continued from page 1

JenLukasandlocalchildwateringseedsinBlairGrocery’sgreenhouseCourtesyofJenLukas

FBIInvestigationof FraudContinuesDominique VargasStaffWriter

Arriving on campus in January of 2010,Mr.ToddKilburnisthenewestadditiontoNaro-paUniversity’ssenioradministrativestaff.Mr.KilburnwashiredastheUniversity’sChief Ad-ministrativeOfficer (CAO),which is abrandnewpositionatNaropaandservesasadirectreport to the President, Dr. Stuart C. Lord.

Though Mr. Kilburn is new to Naropa andBoulder, his professional relationship withPresident Lord traces back over five yearsbeginning inHanover,NH,wherebothmenworkedatDartmouthCollege.AtDartmouth,PresidentLord,thenDeanLord,ledtheTuck-er Foundation, which is a college-foundedorganizationthatfocusesonintegratingcom-munity service and spirituality into learning.Mr.KilburnservedasAssistanttotheDean.

In themonths following his appointment asPresident,Dr.Lordformulatedthecreationof theChief AdministrativeOfficer(CAO)posi-tion, and for thisMr.Kilburnwasultimatelychosen. Now at Naropa,Mr. Kilburn is Dr.Lord’sright-handman.Heisresponsiblefor“oversee[ing]theoperationsof thePresident’sOffice” so that Dr. Lord can “dedicate histime tomore fundraising,”Mr.Kilburn said.

In outlining the position more broadly, Mr.Kilburn explained that the CAO also servesasabridgebetweenthePresident’sOfficeandthe greater community, facilitating the com-municationbetweenthedifferentdepartmentsatNaropaandbringingtolighttheissuesthatneed addressing from around the campus.

Additionally,Mr.Kilburnisalsoamemberof the President’s Cabinet, which is composedof six senior administrators responsible forvarying aspects of theUniversity. Accordingto Mr. Kilburn, in his capacity on the cabi-net,he“thinksaboutwhatagenda itemsand

what processes or issues need to be talkedabout or developed,” in an effort to ame-liorate the President’s executive workload.InexplaininghispurposeatNaropa,Mr.Kil-burnreiteratedthatheisheretoassistthePresi-dentinallwayspossiblesothatDr.Lord’stimecanbefreetofocusonapersistentUniversitypriory: fundraising. Andwhile thePresidentis away from campus,Mr. Kilburn is largelyresponsibleformanagingdomesticaffairsoncampusastheypertaintothePresident’sOffice.

Furthermore, in acknowledging the breadthof tasksthatlaybeforethePresident,Mr.Kil-burnnotedthathiseffortsallowDr.Lordthetimenecessary to address thepressing issuessurrounding Naropa’s budget sustainability.

Realizing that theHigher LearningCommis-sion (HLC)hascriticized theUniversity’sfis-cal practices, Mr. Kilburn explained that hisresponsibilities includeassistingthePresidentto meet the HLC’s requirements and ensureNaropa’s long-term financial sustainability.

TheHLCinspectionteam’sfindings,accordingtoMr.Kilburn,“gavethepush”necessarytobeginimplementingbudgetchangesthathave

MeetToddKilburn,Naropa’sChief AdministrativeOfficerEmma CourtneyStaffWriter

Continued on page 3

EmmaCourtneyofTheSycamore

CongressmanJaredPolis

ToddKilburn,CAO

Continued from page 1

Page 3: The Sycamore Issue 2

“LoveInAction–BuilditfortheChildrenBenefitConcert”isafeaturedeventintheupcomingNaro-paFest.TheeventwillraisemoneyandawarenessaboutthejointeffortsbyNaropa’sEarlyChildhoodEducationDepartment andTheAmericasAsso-ciationfortheCareof Children(AACC)tobuildavocationalschoolinasmallvillageinNicaragua.Naropa student Estrella Lozano has been thepioneer behind creating the “Love In Action”event. Upon finding out about this educationalproject developing in Jalapa, Nicaragua, Estrellasaid she felt “inspired.” Through her inspira-tion, local talents and vendors have organizedto create this upcoming eventwhere people cancontributetothecausewhilehavingagoodtime.

NicaraguaisthesecondpoorestnationintheWest-ernHemisphere.Thecountryisstillstrugglingtorebuild its infrastructure after suffering damagefromawarover30yearsago.Asaresult,thereareapproximately17,000childrenbetweentheagesof 7and14livingonthestreetsthroughoutthecountry.

Currently, there areno educationalprograms forthestreetchildren.Theintentionof theprojectistobuildavocationalschoolfocusedonreducingtheeffectsof povertyanddecreasingdependency.

Estrella, along with her co-coordinator and fel-low studentMarkDunlap and a few other corevolunteers,havebeenworkingdiligently tobringthiseventtolife.Runningonabudgetof $1,000sponsored by the Student Union of Naropa(SUN),thevolunteershaveworkedtirelesslytogetasmanythingsdonatedfortheeventaspossible.

All performers have agreed to contribute theirtime and talents for free and local vendors willbe selling their merchandise with the intentionof giving 10% of the proceeds towards build-ingthevocationalschoolaswellasanadditional10% towards Naropa’s student emergency fund.

In describing the broad support the event hasreceived,Estrella explained that the universehasbeenonhersideinhelpingtocoordinatetheben-efitconcert.Shenotedthatontworareoccasionswheresheneededtohitchhike,shefoundBouldercommunitymemberswho, after hearing her talkof the mission of “Love in Action,” graciouslyagreed to donate their expertise and resources.

On thefirst occasion,Mr.PeterFiori, ownerof SweetwaveAudio, agreed todonatehis timeandmanage the event’s sound and lighting. On thesecond occasion, Estrella met Mr. Tom Ham-mondwhoagreedtobuildthestagefortheevent.

“Bethechangeyouwishtoseeintheworld,”isaquoteof Ghandi’sthatEstrellausesashermotto.“Beingof serviceisthekindletomyfire.Regard-lessof myownpersonal trialsandtribulations,Iexisttocontributetothegreatergood.AstheBea-tleswouldsay–Allyouneedislove,”Estrellasaid.

“LoveInAction”willtakeplaceonNaropaUni-versity’sArapahoecampuslawnonApril23rddur-ingNaropaFest.Throughouttheweektherewillbearangeof events thatfocusonglobalaware-ness. In concluding her thoughts on the eventEstrella said, “everyone should spread theword,extendtheirlove,andcometomakeadifference!”

beenintheplanningstagesformanyyears.Mr.Kil-burnaddedthatwhentheHLCreturnsintwoyearsfora“focus”visit,theywillwanttoseethattheUni-versityhasestablished“somesortof financialstabil-ity and amore streamlined organizationalmodel”.

In expressing his feedback on the HLC’s re-port, Mr. Kilburn also said the inspectionteam “got Naropa” – indicating his opin-ion that the HLC understands the University.

Still,accordingtoMr.Kilburnthechallengenowrestsinthehandsof theAdministrationbecausethey(himself included)areresponsibleforimplementingthestruc-turalreorganizationneededtostreamlinethebudget.

Inspiteof thechallenges,Mr.KilburndidnotethatthemoodintheAdministrationispositiveandhope-ful.HefurtherstressedthatstudentsshouldnotfeeladverselyaffectedbytheUniversity’sbudgetarywoesbecause the restructuring would not deprive stu-dentsof anyopportunitiesthattheycurrentlyhave.

Continued from page 2

ItTakesDedicationtoPut“LoveinAction”Ania ChapskaSeniorStaffPhotographer

AniaChapskaofTheSycamoreEstrellaLozano

Page3 April 15, 2010TheSycamore

TheCouncilof WomenatNaropaMakesStrides

The Council of Women at Naropa is asmall, newly formed women’s group oncampus aimed at awakening the femi-ninevoicewithintheNaropacommunity.

The group,which is the first of its kindat the University, is composed of indi-viduals from all walks of Naropa-life,including students, faculty, and staff.The Council’s co-founder Nicole Jarrillcommented, “It is surprising thatwe arethe first, yet I am glad that the commu-nity has been so receptive to this idea.”

Indescribingtheinspirationforthegroup,fellowco-founderAmyCarlsonsaid,“TheCouncil forWomenatNaropawasbornoutof ElainaVerveer’sCivicEngagementSeminar,whichNicoleandI took inFall2009.”Adding,“wewantedtoelevatewom-en’s collective voice [at Naropa]. Rather

thanbroadlytakingonwomen’sissues,wesoughttofindawaytolocalizetheissue.”

In an effort to engage the “local” issueswithin the community, the Council hasundertaken a campaign to balance thefemalepresenceattheUniversitybyadd-ing framed pictures of notable womenthroughout Naropa’s three campuses.

Noting the motivation for the project,Carlson said, “In my diversity class, welearnedthatonecouldsimplylookatthewallsof an institutiontoseewhowas inpower. Upon reflection of this atNaro-pa, I noticed the framed images weremainlymen. As a woman, I feel it valu-abletoseeotherwomenasrolemodels.”

This project has received direct supportfrom theOfficeof thePresident aswellas senior facultymembers, includingAs-sociate Dean for Undergraduate Educa-tion, Dr. Susan Burggraf. “The presi-dent has helped launch this council. He

totally rearrangedour thinking, askingusto go farther thenwe imagined.He rec-ommended getting nine images up andsupportedus thewholeway,” Jarrill said.

Included within the broader goals of the Council is addressing the lack of a women’s resource center at Naropa.To tackle this issue, the Council aimsto branch out to other resource cen-ters within Boulder in order to developa sense of how to build such an entity.

Explaining thepurposeof suchacenter,Jarrill said, “This will be a place womencangotogetinformationabouteverythingfromrape,abuseandcounselingtoempow-ermentandhealthyrelationshiptraining.”

Theformationof theCouncilcloselyfol-lows the creation of theWomen’s Stud-ies minor at Naropa. Both Carlson andJarrill acknowledged the inclusion of the minor as an important step towardbringing greater diversity to Naropa.

Dayna Larson & Patrick BarryContributingWriters

Many students at Naropa may be un-awareof thefactthattheuniversityhasaContemplative Education Department.Thedepartmentwascreatedin1990andoffersanMAinContemplativeEduca-tionandaBAinEarlyChildhoodEdu-cation.BecausetheMAisalow-residen-cyprogramutilizingonlinecourseworkandsummerclasses, itspresenceisnotknowntothebulkof thestudentbody.

The department’s founder and currentCo-Chair,RichardBrown, satdown todiscusscontemplativeeducationatNaro-paandinthefieldof educationgenerally.

When asked to define ContemplativeEducation,Mr.Brownresponded,“Con-templative Education has a groundingin a Spiritual Tradition and practice.”He went on to discuss the ways thatdifferenttraditionsmanifestatNaropa.“It is not just TibetanBuddhism. Thefounder had as part of his vision theinclusion of several traditions; howdoes Hinduism view contemplation ineducation or Christianity or Judaism?”

Brownwent on to explain howdiffer-entindividualsmightviewcertainprac-ticesasbetterorworse,ormoreorlessuseful for the contemplative approach.“Butthatcanleadyoubacktocontem-platingthequestionof whyyoufeelthatway.WhydoIthinkthispracticeisbet-terthananother?Whatmighttheotherapproachbetryingtoofferthelearningprocess?”He agreed that the differenttraditionsmightnot simplyoffer alter-nateapproaches,butthatthenatureof acontemplativeapproachmaybebeyondany one approach and actually requirethe inclusion of all those differences.

Upondiscussing thedifference incon-templativeeducationbetweeneducatorsandstudents,Brownsaid,“Weencour-agetheteachertobeawareof theirin-nerexperience.Welookatteachingasanembodiedexperienceandalsoquestion-ingourexperiencebeinginfrontof theclassroom...Youcancheckinandseewhenyouaresimplyboostingyourego.”

In addition to his work at Naropa,BrownhasbeenactiveinteachingCon-templative Education approaches toteachers from across the country. Ad-ditionally, Brown, along with ReligiousStudiesProfessorJudithSimmer-Brown,travelled to Bhutan as consultants onContemplativeEducationlastsemester.

In closing, Brown noted that educa-tors at all levels have come toNaropafor workshops and seminars to learnmore about bringing the contempla-tive approach to all facets of teaching.

If you are interested in learning more about Contemplative Education visit the Aca-demic section of Naropa University website.

ContemplativeEducationandBeyondatNaropa

Dr.RichardBrownCourtesyofDr.Brown

Garret CurlerContributingWriter

Kilburn is Right HandMan

Page 4: The Sycamore Issue 2

Creative NaropaPage4 April 15, 2010TheSycamore

While she labored on the chicken, the manworkedonthedoghouse.Hebegantodothisduring the afternoons,when she drank in thehouse. The days previous, he had taken hishammer to the flooring and paneling of anabandonedhomesteaddowntheroad.Wheel-barrowedthebustedboardsbackandcutlittlewallsfromthem.Madearoof fromscavengedlumber.

Thedogsinthewoodsbeganabandoningtheirweakerpupswiththeturnof thefallweather.The orphanmutts sometimes wandered ontotheir landbefore dying.He found the frostedbodiesandsheburiedthem.Hebegantothinkhewouldcatchoneof themuttsandbringitforher to raise.When thehousewasfinished,hewouldinsulatethewallswithatornbabymat-tresshehadfoundintheirattic.

Themanwasthinkingof thiswhenhesawtheboycoming from thedirectionof thewoods,stumbling inazigzagthroughthefallowfield.Hisheadwasablacksmudgeinthedistance.Hecamerighttowardthedoghouseandtheman,draggingasackbehindhim.

Themanstoodupfromhisworkandwatchedthe boy. He was dressed like the rest of thechildreninthearea,canvasclothinglikedraftysacks sewn together. But when the boy wasclose,themansawheworeablackmaskmadefromthesamematerialashisclothes,askeletonfacedrawnacrossitwithchalk.

The boy stopped in front of the doghouse,lookedup at theman, anddepositedhis sackbetweenthem.

“Trickortreat,”theboysaidlowly.

Themanlookeddownattheboy’ssack.Itwasasheetclosedandtwistedoveraboxshape,blackandtatteredfromhavingbeendraggedsofar.

“It’s not Halloween anymore, boy,” the mansaid.

Theboypressedoneof hismuddybootsdownonthesackasif tomakesuretherewassome-thingstillinsideit.

“Trickortreat.”Helookeddownathissack.

Themanrestedhishammeracrosshisshoulderandlookeddownattheboy.

“Isaidyou’relate.Lost,too.Whatareyoudoingouthere?”

Theboyliftedhisbaganddroppedit.Lookedupat themanas if theairbetweenthemhadbeenclearedbytheact.

Themansighed.“Yougotaname?”

Theboylookedattheground,hisbreathloudandnostrily.Themaskhungcrudeoff hishead.Themanhadnoideawhattheboycouldevenseeoutof theraggedeyeholes.

“Aw,hell.Let’sgoontothehouse.”Theboyhitcheduphissackandstuckouthishandtobeled.Themanlookedatitforamo-ment,thenmotionedwithhishead.

“It’soverthisway,boy.”

Whentheygottothehouse,theboydroppedhissackonthetopstepandsatunpromptedontheporchswing.Herockedbackandforthonthe swing,kickingoveremptywhiskeybottlesontheupswing.

Themancalledtoherinthehouse.Afteramo-ment,shecametothescreendoor,adrinkclink-inginherhandassheleanedintothescreentolookoutontotheporch.

“It’s aboy,”he said. “Wanderedout from thewoods.”“The hell are you talking about,” she saidthroughthescreen.Ithungfreeinonecorner,themeshdottedwithinsects.“The boy.”He jerked his thumb behind him.“Seems to think it’s Halloween. Long damnHalloween.”

Heopenedthescreendoor.

“Why do you do this to me?” she said. “Weshouldneverhavecomeouthere.Leavemebe.”

She reached out and shut the screen on him.Slammedthefrontdoorafterit.

Hestoodthereforseveralmoments,staringatthescratchedfinishof theoldoakdoor.

“Hell,boy.”

Butnoonewasthere.

Theporchswingstillswayed.Themanwenttothetopstepandscannedthefield.Lookedoff into thewoods.Went around thebackof thehouseandlookedundertheporch.

The boy was nowhere to be seen. When hecame around the front of the house, he no-ticedtheboy’ssheetsackstillonthetopstep.Hebentdownandchuckeditoverhisshoulderand,withalookbackatthefrontdoor,tooktheslowwalkbacktohiswork.

Sounds came from the woods. The howls of crazeddogs,noclaimintheworlduponthem.Themewlsof theirwildorphans.Hecrawledinto the doghouse and sat on the floor anddroppedthesackbetweenhistwoboots.Tookouthermatchbookandlitthematches,lettingthemburnonebyonedowntohisfingertips.

When they were gone, he lifted the sack andletitunwinditself.Afterthesheetfellawayhestaredforalongtimeatwhatwasinside.Twodead,frostedpups,curledaroundasmallwood-enbox.Amusicbox,hethought.

He put the emptiedmatchbook in his pocketand listened to the sounds that came at himfromthewild.

OrphansShane JiménezContributingWriter

“LookingForWork”

FreeBoxSarah SmithContributingArtist

“NewAgePick-Ups”

LifeinTheNewAge©2010

Forbes Ellis & Tawn KenndyContributingArtist

LifeinTheNewAge©2010

Page 5: The Sycamore Issue 2

“Hit the ground running” doesn’t even come close to de-scribing thewhirlwindexperienceofarriving inNicaragua.

OurfirsttwodaysinthecapitalcityofManaguaconsistedofgoingtoclinics,shelters,alandfillcommunitycalledLaChureca,housesdoortodoor,thefirstfairtradeshopintheworldandavillageconsistingofprimarilyrelocatedresidentsofLaChureca.

Everywherewewentwefoundourselvesconducting inter-viewswiththepeopleweencountered.Althoughdifficultatfirst,wesoongrewintothereoccurringhabit.ThenexttendayswerespentintheJalapaValley,about20kilometersfromtheborderofHonduras.Here,welivedwithhostfamilies,workedalongsidePIEAT(ProgramaIntegralEducandoconAmoryTenurewhichmeans“theintegralprogramofeducationwithloveandtenderness”),andmembersofthelocalcommunityofLaTierraPromitera–“ThePromisedLand.”

OnceinJalapa,wehelpedbuildaschoolforchildren,plantedgar-dens,andevensharedsomecontemplativepractices,likeyogaandotherrelaxationtechniques.Wealsovisitedlocaltobaccobarns,whichiswhereasignificantpopulationofJalapaworks.

Exposuretosuchconditionswasanimportant,yetfrightening,experience.OnlyonedaywasspentawayfromourworkinJa-

lapa,whenwegotachancetospendanightinaremotemountainvillageandthenmakethefive-hourhikedownthefollowingday.

My personal reasons for going to Ni-caragua were based in a desire to puttheory into practice. I wanted to con-front my own assumptions and ideasof what poverty was, while expand-ing my knowledge about the situationboth conceptually and contextually.

Unlike any other traveling I’ve done, inNicaraguaIhadtoimmersemyselfinthecultureandfosterareciprocalrelationshipwith the people on the land. It becameimportanttoaskhardquestionsandlistendeeply.Ifoundmyselffacetofacewiththerealitiesofpoverty,ecologicaldestructionand socioeconomic andgenderdiscrimi-

nation morethan ever be-fore. In thepastit might havebeen easy formeto ignore these things or havebeen blinded to such issues inthecontextoflifeinBoulder,buthere these experiences grabbedmyattentionandwouldn’t letgo.

When I had my hands in theearth, planting fruit trees along-side the mothers, fathers, sonsanddaughtersofLaTierraPromi-tera, Iwasfeeling thesweat, see-ing the smiles, and conversingwith theworkers.This sharingof space, timeandstoryaddedan extraordinary new dimen-sionandmeaning to thework.

Whiletheseconnectionswerenurturedthroughdialogueandstorytelling,theyallhadthebackdropofworkingtogetherwith a commonpurpose. Because of theworkweweredoing,aninnershiftstartedtooccur.Somethinghadbeguntounravel.Truthsthathadbeenmissingorobscuredfromourcollectiverealitywererevealed.TherewasanattemptbyallofustobreatheinthediverseexperiencesoflivingandworkingwiththepeopleofNicaraguaasbestwecould.

Thelessonswelearnedwerefoundsomewhere in the morning busrideswith localsand inthestoriesmyhostmothertold.Itwassome-whereinthejoyofseeingthechil-drensmilewhilelearningtoplayanewgame.Itwasinthehandshakesafterahousevisitorafterwehauledstonesandmixedconcrete. Itwasin the facesof thosewhoworkedinthefieldsandinthefactories.Itwasinshowingupeverydayinthecommunity,beingpresent and lis-teningtothevoicesofthepeople.

But this trip wasn’t about help-ing people who are helpless andit wasn’t about any one group ofpeople coming to save another. Itwasaboutfindingsometruththroughworking in mutual responsibility.

It’s a humbling experience and a kind ofmagic that hap-pens when people, regardless of background, come to-gether united by a desire to change. I feel we all becomeliberated just a little bitmorewhenwework in solidarity.

Theexperiencehasshowedmejusthowmuchtimeandpa-tiencethisreallytakes,andithasalsomademebelievemoresothaneverthequotebyGillScott-Heronwhichreads“No-bodycandoeverything,buteverybodycandosomething”.

Page5 April 15, 2010TheSycamore

LivingNicaragua

ScottKaplanofPranaphoto.com

ScottKaplanofPranaphoto.com

ScottKaplanofPranaphoto.com

Communitymemberswaitinglineforfruittrees

Localfamilyposingforaphoto

LastremainingtreeinwhatisnowalandfieldScottKaplanofPranaphoto.com

Childrenplayingbeneathaparachute

Scott KaplanStaffPhotographer

Page 6: The Sycamore Issue 2

Page6 April 15, 2010TheSycamore

Opinions

It’s late Friday night on April 2nd, 2010and like some anxious child waiting upfor their favorite holiday, I cannot sleep.Tomorrow is the first farmers’ marketof the season and I’m salivating in an-ticipationof purple potatoes, baby springgreens,pungent ripecheeses, and the fac-esof thefarmersIhaven’tseensince lastNovember. I can’t help it; I’m a foodie.

EverySaturday for the last3yearsduringthefarmers’marketseason,IhaveeatenatofucrepeandicedcoffeeattheVietnamesenoodlestandforbreakfast.AsmallVietnam-esewomannamedTammyandafewof herrelativesoperate thenoodlestand.SeveralyearsagoIaskedhertocustomizeasavorycrepeformewithherhomemadetofuandthegreenssheuses forhernoodlebowls.

Latelastyearshepaidhomagetomypatron-ageandofficiallyputitonthemenu.Thereare few people outside of my immediatefamilyandselectfriendsthatintuitivelyun-derstandmethewaythatTammyprobablydoes. The most remarkable thing is thatthis relationship is not unique to Tammyand me. In this fast paced hyper-individ-ualized world, I see similar relationships

blossoming all over the farmers’ market.

LikemanyNaropastudentsIamverycon-sciousaboutwhatIeatandwheremyfoodcomesfrom.Myweeklyvisitstothefarmers’markethavetransfiguredintoasacredactof pilgrimage.Imayneverbeabletocircum-ambulateMountKailashor followasonglineinAustraliabutIknowtheentirejour-neyof mostof myfoodfromseedtotable.

Throughout my education at Naropa Ihave learned that no matter what waywe look at it, eating has become a politi-calact. Inmyopinion,growingyourownfood or purchasing it directly from thosewhogrewitisanactof civildisobediencejust as powerful as Gandhi’s salt march.

With spring upon us, I would like to en-couragemy fellow students to pilgrimageto the farmers’market and initiate a newtype of contemplative practice and rela-tionshiptowhatyoueat.Thefoodweeathasthepotentialtotransformourpersonaland collective consciousness into a newparadigm.Atthefarmers’marketyoucanbearwitness to thepowerof eating local.

Farmers’MarketPilgrimage

Kristy ButtsContributingColumnist

ChoosingtheNextStudentTrusteePhil BattosManagingEditor

I was recently engaged in a conversationabouttheecologicaldamagecreatedbymod-erncities.After twentyminutesof fruitlesslytrying to get my friend to admit that mod-ern cities are ecologically destructive, I wasfrustrated and discouraged. Why couldn’the just see it my way? If this all seems soobvious at Naropa, then why am I havingsuch difficulty reaching out to my friend?

This kind of dialogue is a crucial stumblingpoint in the environmental movement. Itoften leads to individual conflict and gen-eralizations of environmentalism. Thisneedn’t be the case. We must consider thenature of this problem, and how theNaro-pa community can turn toward a solution

I have discovered that engaging in conver-sation with the goal of trying to get oth-ers to think ourway tends to producemea-ger results, however tempting it may be.

When we dialogue in the fashion of “youmust care about the environment as muchas I do” we are playing a losing game. Inthat moment, we have drawn a line inthe sand, a chasm dividing individuals.

Furthermore, conveying an environmentalmessageinthiswayleadstoageneraldefen-sivenessandstereotypingtowardtheenviron-mentalmovement.Regrettably, theprevailingpublicattitudeinregardsto“environmental-ists”are“thosepeoplewhoaretellingmehowIshouldlive”or“thosepeoplewhoaremakingmefeelguiltyaboutdrivingmycartowork.”Obviously, this kind of sentiment is damag-

ingtowardsasustainablevisionof thefuture.Apprehensive and reactionary attitudestoward the environmental movementare especially frustrating because, ulti-mately, we humans are on the same team.

Oil executives, land developers andRepubli-cans,whateverwemay thinkof them, enjoythe beach, parks and forests of the worldasmuch aswedo.Fundamentally, noone isactually against the environment. How thencan we use this information to more effec-tively convey ecological and social sustain-ability without triggering defensiveness?

Ithinktheanswerisinspiringavision.Whenengaging with others who hold dissimilarworld views, I’ve found it’s important to of-fer inspiration rather than invite debate.

Insteadof saying“ourmoderncitiespolluteanddestroy ecological systems,” apoint thatinvites contention, I could have said, “imag-ine a city that ismutually enhancing tobothpeopleandtheenvironment.”Thisbrandof interaction fosters new thinking and givesmeaningful direction to the conversation.

ItisparamountthatweintheNaropacommu-nitycommunicatemessagesof socialandeco-logicalsustainabilityinlightof thefactthatallhumansshareaninherentlovefortheenviron-ment.If wedialoguefromthislens,opennessand, most importantly, cooperation emerge.

Like most private colleges, Naropa Univer-sityisgovernedbyaBoardof Trustees.TheTrusteesarelegallyandfinanciallyresponsiblefortheUniversity.Theyselectthepresident,approve theannualbudget, andhave thefi-nalsayinallimportantissuesatNaropa.TheTrustees are some of the most committedsupporters of theUniversity. In addition tomaking large donations every year, they areconstantly working to expand the reach of the Naropa mandala to provide more re-sources and opportunities for our students.

Since1990,NaropahashadaStudentTrusteewho is a full votingmember of the Board.Although it is very unusual for a school of Naropa’s size to have a Student Trustee,Naropa’s leadership strives to include stu-dent participation at all levels of Univer-sity decision-making. The Student Trusteeis avital sourceof communicationbetween

the students and the Board of Trustees.Ihavehadthehonorof servingas theStu-dentTrustee since 2008,when thepreviousStudent Trustee, David Christie, graduated.My participation in the Naropa communityasbothastudentandaTrusteehasallowedme to fully experience the beauty and chal-lenges of our University. As a student, Ihave felt the warm and fuzzies that stirredsomanyof uswhenwefirstdiscoveredthisplace. I have been awed by the compassionof mypeersandhumbledbytheknowledgeanddedicationof myteachers.Ihavefeltthepinchof payingtuitionandbillswhileonfi-nancialaidinanaffluentcityandinacoun-try that compelsmost students to assumeaburdenof debtbefore theyhavegraduated.

As a trustee, Ihave seenhow the founder’svisionarysparkleforcontemplativeeducationhasbeensustainedandarticulatedinacultureof leadershipthatcelebratescreativity,tradi-tion,andsocialresponsibility.AndIhaveseenhowtheeconomicrecessionhashadrealmate-rialconsequencesonNaropa’sbudget,endow-

ment,andourabilitytotransformourinstitu-tionintotheplacethatwealldreamitcanbe.The Student Trustee position providesan excellent opportunity to participatein student government, meet some of Naropa’s pioneering leaders, and servethe University by bringing a studentvoice to the most far-ranging decisions.

My termwill end in the fall so the StudentUnion of Naropa (SUN) will be hostingan election in September for the next Stu-dent Trustee. This position plays an inte-gral role in our community so it is impor-tant foreverymemberof our studentbodyto participate in the evaluation and electionof the candidates. I hope youwill considernominating a candidate who can repre-sent the values and interests of the studentbody.Further,Ihopeeachof youexpress-es your vision for our future with a vote. CourtesyofNaropaUniversity

PhilBattos,StudentTrustee

Everyone’sEnvironment

Brian RossContributingColumnist

CourtesyofKristyButts

Page 7: The Sycamore Issue 2

Page7 April 15, 2010TheSycamore

Featured Student GroupIntegralNaropa(iN)

Integral Naropa (iN) is becoming a potentgatheringplaceforsomeof Naropa’sbright-estandmostembodiedminds.EveryWednes-daysatnoon,thefoundersof “iN”createanewwayof translatingthegreatestteachingsof theEastandWest inorder tocultivateacommonlanguageforpersonaldevelopment.

IntegralNaropaincludesagroupof dedicatedspiritualpractitionerswhoseaimitistogroundIntegral Consciousness on the Universitycampus through a plurality of perspectives.

iN upholds the intention that while every-body cannot be completely right all of thetime, everybody brings a valuable piece of truththatrevealsaneverpresentwhole.Thisintegralframeworkallowsmemberstobringtogetherdiversepartsof theirhumanexperi-enceasawayof expressing theslogan“thewhole is greater than the sumof its parts.”

The language of Integral Naropa hasbecome an essential tool for the emer-gency that is faced today: fragmentation.

While the psychologies of the West canbecome consumed by the analysis of ex-terior frames of development, the Con-templative Traditions are often dismissedas arbitrary and fantastical. At Naro-pa, however, students are acutely awareof the power that both traditions offer.

As iN begins to radically reevaluate what itmeanstobehuman,andwhatitmeanstoliveinaworldthatholdsboththespanof scienceandthedepthof spirit,participantsbeginto

seehownecessaryan integralworldview is.

When people are able to hold an integralperspective, western psychology and con-templative practices begin to complimentand strengthen each other as friends. Wit-nessingtheelementsof truthinallperspec-tives can also enable people to view tradi-tionssuchasBuddhism,Christianity,Shinto,and Judaism as agreeable and compatible,rather than contradictory. iN is cultivating aspaceforeverypieceof thepuzzletofinda

home and make a friend. Leadership andpersonal development are key focal pointsof this rapidly maturing student groupthat is currently accepting new members.

To join the iN mailing list, please e-mail: [email protected]

Erik Lenderman & Jesse SeaversiNCo-Founders

ScottKaplanofPranaphoto.comiNmembersatweeklymeeting

Events

“Spreadpeacethroughabowlof tea,”wasthemes-sagepasseddownfromSenNoRikyuof the16thcentury,andthatmessageresonatesintraditionalteaceremoniestothisday.Chado(thewayof tea)isnotjustagatheringfortealovers,butawayof lifeincorporating theZenBuddhist concepts of wabiandsabi,or“beautyinsimplicity.”

OnApril7,MichaelRicci, acertified instructor inthe Urasenke lineage of Chado, lead a group of communitymembers in the traditionalChadoTeaCeremony at theTeaHouse atNaropa. TheTeaHouse,whichwasmovedfromChögyamTrungpa’shouseafterhisdeath,isnowasanctuaryattheUni-versity.

Attheevent,theceremony’sfourprinciplesof har-mony, respect, purity and tranquility were put topractice.Mastering eachof theseprinciples in theceremony and then incorporating them into dailylife helps one to find the place of tranquility thatresideswithineachbeing.

Astherearearound850documentedvariationsof theceremony,themasteryof Chadocantakeyearstocomplete,andthestudyingof thefinernuancesmay take a lifetimeas theygetmorecomplexandformal,consistingof deeperteachings.

Themasterpractitionerof theChadomustalsobe

familiarwithotherdisciplines thatare interrelated,suchascalligraphy,flowerarranging,andpottery.MichaelhasstudiedwithvariousinstructorsacrosstheU.S.andEurope,buthismostprominentstudiestookplaceattheUrasenkeHeadquartersinKyoto,undertheoriginal15thgenerationgrandteamasterhimself.

The Urasenke lineage of Chado has been passeddownintraditiontowhat isnowthe16thgenera-tionof blooddescendants.AlthoughitoriginatedinJapan, therearecentersallover theworldofferingintensestudyof masteringtheceremony.

ForMichael,thewayof theteahasbecomehiswayof life.Immersinghimself intheZenBuddhisttra-ditionsover adecade ago,henoted that, “tea is acontemplativepracticethatcultivatesawareness.”

Andthiscontemplativepracticeiswhathehasspentthelastsixyearsdevotedto,teachingeagerstudentssothattheytoocanunderstandthepeacefulwayof this sacred practice.Michael noted that it was hishopethattheTeaCeremonywouldonedaybecomeapartof Naropa’sTraditionalEasternArtscurricu-lum.

Tea Ceremonies take place on Mondays from 3 to 6 PM at the Naropa Tea House located on the Arapahoe Campus. Students interested learning more can contact Michael Ricci at: [email protected]

TheSimpleTraditionof Tea

Ania ChapskaSeniorStaffPhotographer

AniaChapskaofTheSycamore

MichaelRicciperformingtraditionalteaceremony

Page 8: The Sycamore Issue 2

Page8 April 15, 2010TheSycamore

JOIN THE SYCAMOREThisNewspaperNeedsYou!

• StudentJournalists• Op-EdColumnists• Artists• Cartoonist

• PrintLayoutDesigners• WebDesigners• CreativeWriters• GuestContributors

We’re looking for:

Interested?

E-mailus:[email protected]

Visitusonthewebat:www.thesycamore.org

Bi-Weekly Events Calender

Thursday,April15 Friday,April16 Saturday,April17 Sunday,April18 Monday,April19 Tuesday,April20 Wednesday,April21

Thursday,April29

Second Issue of The Sycamore Released

AvailableonAllCampuses

Sponsored by S.U.N

Thursday,April22 Friday,April23 Saturday,April24 Sunday,April25 Monday,April26 Tuesday,April27 Wednesday,April28

Friday,April30

Brian StoneCalendarManager

Dr.PaulaGreenSpeakstotheCommunity

On April 7th, as part of The LenzFoundation Series of DistinguishedLectures, Dr. Paula Green spoke be-fore a packed Performing Arts Cen-teraboutherworkasaninternationalpeacebuilder.

Introduced by Provost and VP of Academic Affairs Stuart Sigman, Dr.Greendiscussedhercareerinworkingwithpeoplethroughouttheworldthathave been affectedby the “cycle” of violentconflict.

In 1994,Dr.Green founded theKa-runaCenterforPeaceBuilding,whichhostsexpeditionsintocountrieswhere

conflict has occurred and holds pro-gramstosupportdialogueandconflictresolution.

Dr.Green’s work as a facilitator andlecturer has spanned six continents,including countries such as Bosnia,Rwanda,andAzerbaijan.

Speakingonherpersonalpathtowardbecoming apeacebuilder,Dr.Greennoted she began her professional ca-reerasapsychologist,butafteraccept-ing a teaching position at the Schoolfor International Training (SIT), shebecameincreasinglydrawntothefieldof peacebuildingthroughdialogue.

Attheevent,Dr.Greensaid,“WhatIdoisnotmagic,butIallowpeopleto

bringtheirfull,authenticself.”

Throughout her lecture, Dr. Greenexpressed her enthusiasm for Naro-pa and its mission. She noted that,“Peaceisinourreach-anditisuptoyoutoapplywhatyouare learningatNaropa[forpeace].”Sheconcludedbysaying,“Theworldneedseveryoneof you.”

Theevent’ssponsor,TheLenzFoun-dation, has been an important donortoNaropa.Throughouttheyears,theyhaveprovidedtheUniversitywithstu-dent scholarships, a visiting fellowsprogram, curriculum developmentfunding, as well as theDistinguishedLectures.

Isaac EideStaffWriter

CheeXiongofTheSycamore

Dr.PaulaGreenspeakinginPAC

4:30-5:30PM

LincolnShrineroomSitwithLamaTenpa

7:00-8:30PM

WesleyChapel1290FolsomStBoulderPrideForum

8:00PM

PerformingArtsCenterExploringbody/voice

8:00-10:00AM

NalandaEventsCenterLecture:TheHWMyth

12:00PM

PerformingArtsCenterConcertPercussionist

8:00PM

PerformingArtsCenterExploringbody/voice

7:30PM

NalandaStudio,Rm:9190AmericanDreambox

1:00-3:00PM

Paramita,ViryaRmPartnerYogaWrkshp

12:00-1:00PM

LincolnShrineRmSukhavatiCeremony

9:00PM

NalandaStudio,Rm9190Puffs:AThesisShow

9:00AM

47thSt.atKalmiaField4NaropaSoccerGame9:30-12:00PM

Rm:9180,NalandaFocusing:DeepListening

12:00PM & 4:00PM

Rm:9190.NalandaFromInsideaJunkPile

12:30PM

KGNURadio,88.5FMProf.KapuronMLK

3:00-4:00PM

NaropaTeaHouseChado:TheWayof Tea

5:15-6:30PM

LincolnShrineRoomZenStyleMeditation

3:45-5:00PM

Dana,ParamitaCampusLion’sRoarMeditation

12:00-1:00PM

UpayaCottageNorthNaropaAA12StepMeeting

12:00-1:30PM

PerformingArtsCenterCongressmanPolis

8:00-9:30PM ViryaandParamitaHallsMAPsyc:Presentations

6:30-8:30PM

Sycamore8120GetaGreatJob

5:00PM

ParamitaHallTheDharmaof Addiction

12:00-1:20PM

ShambhalaHallAsanaCommunityYoga

12:00-1:00PM

ParamitaMeditationHallMaitriBhavanaPractice

12:00-1:20PM

ShambhalaHallAsanaCommunityYoga

9:00AM

ArapahoeCampusGreenLoveinAction:Concert

7:00PM-8:30PM

NalandaEventsCenterBloodof theEarth:Col-oradoRiver

4:30-5:30PM

LincolnShrineroomSitwithLamaTenpa

3:30-6:30PM

BoulderRecreationCntrDharmaBasketball

8:00PM

PerformingArtsCenterWorldDanceConcert

9:00AM

47thSt.atKalmiaField5NaropaSoccerGame

3:00-4:00PM

NaropaTeaHouseChado:TheWayof Tea

7:00-9:00PM

ShambhalaHallStagedReadingof “CalLmECrAzy”

10:00-12:00PM

MeditationHallDharmaOceanNyinthun

12:00-1:00PM

UpayaCottageNorth,NaropaAA12StepMeeting

9:30-10:20AM

ShambhalaHall,AsanaCommunityYoga

6:00-7:30PM

ParamitaMeditationHallZenPeacemakersMeditation

3:45-5:00PM

Dana,ParamitaCampusLion’sRoarMeditation

5:15-6:30PM

LincolnShrineRoomZenStyleMeditation

12:00-1:20PM

ShambhalaHallAsanaCommunityYoga

4:30-5:30PM

LincolnShrineroomSitwithLamaTenpa

5:45PM

47thSt.atKalmiaField6NaropaSoccerGame

12:00-1:20PM

ShambhalaHallAsanaCommunityYoga

Updates: thesycamore.org/events.php