Click here to load reader

INTRODUCTION - Nacra · INTRODUCTION This owner’s manual is provided to ease assem-bly, maintenance and use of your Prindle Catamaran. We believe these instructions portray

  • View
    214

  • Download
    0

Embed Size (px)

Text of INTRODUCTION - Nacra · INTRODUCTION This owner’s manual is provided to ease assem-bly,...

  • INTRODUCTION

    This owners manual is provided to ease assem-bly, maintenance and use of your PrindleCatamaran. We believe these instructions portraythe simplest methods. Do it our way the firsttime and learn from us. Then, if you discover abetter method, feel free to tell us about it by fax-ing (714) 541-6643 or e-mailing [email protected] You may see your idea appear inthe next edition of the owners manual.

    We are sure you will enjoy your PrindleCatamaran and hope that this manual will makeyour enjoyment easier to come by.

    Make sure you join the Prindle Class Association -its fun and its free to any new owner of a PrindleCatamaran ($15 annually after the first year).You will receive the Performance Sailor, our offi-cial class newsletter. This newsletter containsfeature articles, news and results of regattas,photographs, timely tuning tips, specialannouncements and contests. As a member ofthe Prindle Class Association, you will also beentitled to enter and participate in all of our Classsanctioned regattas.

    One design racing begins at the local fleet levelleading to regional qualifying regattas and culmi-nates with the Annual National ChampionshipRegattas held in a different region every year.Even if you are not a racer, join the Prindle Fleetin your area. Our fleets have held such funevents as watermelon hunts, hull flying contests,group cruises, Prindle barge picnics and clinics.Its much more fun to share the joy of sailing aPrindle Catamaran. If a fleet does not exist inyour area - start one! All you need is a fewenthusiastic owners!

    Make sure your dealer fills out and submits yourwarranty card for your new boat. Not only doesit validate your warranty, but it will also automat-ically register you as a member of the PrindleClass Association. If you have purchased a usedPrindle, please send us your sail and hull num-bers as well as your complete address. Makesure to notify us when you move too, thePerformance Sailor does not get forwarded.

    Keep in touch. We love to hear from our owners!

    1800 East Borchard AvenueSanta Ana, CA 92705

    (714) 835-6416 (714) 541-6643 fax

    www.performancecat.com

    CONTENTSPage

    SECTION I: ASSEMBLY 3Preparation 3Crossbars 3Trampoline 4Rudder System 7Castings 7Tiller Crossbar 7Tiller Extension 8Rudder Blades 8Rudder Lock Bolt 8Adjusting the Helm 8Rudder Alignment 9Operation of Rudder System 9Mast and Rigging 10Masthead 10Spreaders 10Diamond Wires 11Mast Rotator 12Masthorn 12Shrouds and Trapeze Wires 12Forestay and Jib Halyard 13Main Halyard 13Raising the Mast 13Diamond Wires 16Sails and Battens 17Hoisting the Mainsail 18Boom 19Mast Rotator 19Downhaul 20Mainsheet and Traveler 20Jib 21Jib Sheet Jam Preventer 22Righting Line 22Tightening rig tension 23

    SECTION II: SAILINGSail TrimTo weather 23Reaching 23Downwind 23Downhaul Systems 24Trapezing 24Lacing the Harness 24Trapeze Positioning 24Launching 25Onshore 26Offshore 26Tacking 27Jibing 28Balance 28Righting 29Reefing 30

    SECTION III: AFTER SAILINGLoosening the rig 31Lowering the sails 31Trailering 33

    SECTION IV: MAINTENANCEDolphin Striker 35Battens 36Foam/Fiberglass Battens 36General Maintenance Tips 36Hulls 37Rudders 37Sails 37

    SECTION V: TUNING PERFORMANCEMast Rake 37Mast Rotation 37Barberhauler 38

    SECTION VI: SUPPLEMENTAL INFORMATIONMajor Parts of a Boat 39Glossary of Terms 40Knot Illustrations 41

  • Prindle Catamaran Owners ManualSection I:ASSEMBLY

    Preparation Tools needed: large screwdriver pliers needle-nose pliers 1/2 offset wrench combination 1/2 & 9/16 box-end wrench adjustable wrench masking or duct tape silicone sealant

    Your Prindle Catamaran comes packaged intwo hull containers, one large hardware boxand one mast box.

    Place the two hull containers approximately 5feet apart with stapled seams at the top ofthe cartons facing each other. This will insurethat both hulls will be facing the same direc-tion.

    Open the hull containers. Leave the hullsstanding on the cardboard supports.

    Open the hardware box and familiarize your-self with the major parts of your boat. Thecontents of the hardware box should include:

    Open the rigging box. The contents will belisted on the sheet enclosed.

    CROSSBARS

    Remove rubber plugs from hulls. Lay boththe front and rear cross bars on the hullswith the outside edges even with the outsideedges of the hulls. The curf (groove) on thefront crossbar should face aft and the curf onthe back crossbar should face forward.

    To attach inside bolts on the front crossbar,insert 5/16 hex head bolt with washer intoinboard hole in crossbar and through the bolt

    boombattensrear crossbarfront crossbarsails

    trampolinerudder boxrigging boxtiller crossbartiller extension

    3

  • hole in the deck. Put some silicone sealanton your forefinger and reach through thehatch to put the sealant on the bolt where itenters the hull. Attach lock nut and flatwasher to bolt inside hull using 1/2 box-endwrench. If you cannot reach the bolt, tapethe nut to the wrench. Thread nut snugly tohull. Do not tighten until all bolts are snug.

    To attach insidebolts on the rearcrossbar, insert oneof the 5/16 flathead screwsthrough the inboardhole of the rearcrossbar and bolthole in deck pocket.Put a flat washerand lock nut ontothe bolt. You mayfind that taping thenut washer onto awrench is easiest.Tighten loosely using a screwdriver on top ofscrew.

    To attach outside bolts on both crossbars,insert 5/16 hex head bolt with washerthrough crossbarand deck. Insertthrough 6 stainlesssteel bar which fitsunder the deck.Hand tighten.Repeat procedure onall outside bolts.

    Before tighteningdown these 8 bolts,make sure the frontcrossbar sits in thegroove without voids

    between it and the deck. Tighten all boltsdown being careful not to overtighten theoutside bolts on the rear crossbar. Leverageprovided by a 6 long wrench is sufficient forproper tightening.

    Insert rubber plugs into holes in hulls.

    TRAMPOLINE

    From the port hull, insert forward and rearedges of trampoline in curfs on crossbars.The rear edge has two rows of grommets.

    Feed trampoline across boat by alternatelypulling each edge.

    4

  • Tie a figure eight knot in the end of side lac-ing line (1/8 x 11) and begin lacing side oftrampoline beginning at forward slot. Laceline up through deck, through forward loopand back down through deck. Proceed aftand tie off end. Follow same procedure forother side of trampoline.

    Tighten each side by using a pair of pliers orvice grips. Start tightening from the frontand move to the rear. Be sure to get tram-poline centered on boat by lining up thegrommet nearest the front crossbar with thecenter of the mast step. Trim and burnexcess line. Save for use later.

    Lace up the back of the trampoline with 1/4lacing lines 10.5 feet long. Begin by tying adouble overhand knot in one end of each lineand thread through rear grommets, startingup through the rear outside corner grommeton each side.

    Stand at the back of the boat and tightenlines by bracing your foot against the rearcrossbar for leverage. Pull as tight as possi-ble. Tie off lines under trampoline. Do nottrim excess line as this leaves something tohold when retightening tramp.

    Completed rear lacing

    Cut each of the extra scrap lengths of 1/8side lace line into 8 pieces. You will needtwo pieces for single trapeze and 4 pieces fordouble trapeze. Fold line in half and lacethrough block.

    5

  • Tie the block onto the side trampoline tabusing a square knot. Use tab just forward ofhatch for single trapeze and tabs just for-ward and aft of hatch for double trapeze.

    Slip tails of line under tab to hide and keepknot from loosening. Blocks should standstraight up.

    Lead shock cord through block, downthrough grommet by hatch and up throughgrommet and block on opposite side oftramp. Secure end until needed later.

    Attach a 3/16 shackle onto each jib bridlewire. Be sure pin handle is facing up so thatit does not scratch trampoline.

    Tie 3/16 x 6 line to one of the shackles andlead the other end through one set of doublegrommets at center of tramp.

    Using a truckers hitch, tie the line to the3/16 shackle on opposite jib bridle wire.Pull line as tight as possible and tie off usinga row of half hitches.

    6

  • Attach jibblocks to thim-ble at end ofjib bridle wire(not shackle)using 3/16shackle. Besure the jawsof cleat faceinboard.Thread 5/16 x33 jib sheetline by tyingoff one end tojib block withbowline.Thread throughsmall jib clewblocks, throughcleat on jibblock, across tramp and through opposite jibblock in opposite direction. Jib sheet shouldbe one continuous line.

    Hiking straps on trampoline are adjustablefor personal comfort. People with long legsuse the inboard look. Tie off onto a grom-met at rear of tramp.

    RUDDER SYSTEMOpen rudder box, it should contain: left andright rudder castings with tiller arms andcomplete workings installed and 2 rudderblades with lock pins attached.

    CastingsTo install ruddercasting ontotransom, makesure Prindleinsignia is onoutboard side.Remove cotterkey and pintelfrom casting.Line up castingwith gudgeonsand casting.

    Tiller CrossbarTo attach tillercrossbar to tillerarms, remove1/4 bolt, wash-er and lock nutfrom end oftiller arm. Placetiller crossbarover tillers withlarge hole atend facing upand end cappop rivet facingaft. Drop 1/4bolt downthrough cross-bar, puttingwasher betweentiller crossbarand tiller arm. Insert 1/4 bolt through holein tiller arm and put lock nut on end. Makesure lines inside tiller go on either side ofbolt, do not cross them. Do not put the nuton the bolt at adjuster end of crossbar untilthe rudders have been aligned (instructionslater).7

  • TillerExtensionRemove lock-nut from endof tiller exten-sion. Attachextension totiller crossbarand reattachlocknut. Tillerextensionshould be ableto touch tram-poline easily.If it does not,the tiller cross-bar has beeninstalled back-wards.

    RudderBladesTo install rud-der blades intorudder cast-ings, untieends of down-haul anduphaul lines incastings butDO NOTUNLACE.Remove 1/4bolt with lock-nut. Placerudder bladebetween cast-ing with lockpin forward.

    Insert 1/4 bolt through casting and 1/4hole in rudder blade. Replace locknut andtighten until rudder will just fall by itself. Donot overtighten as this will restrict ruddermovement, to loose and rudder will be slop-py in casting. Thread downhaul and uphaullines into rudder blade and tie off ends witha figure eight knot. Make sure the ends donot extend beyond the edge of the blade.Follow same procedure on both blades.

    Rudder LockBoltThe rudder lockbolt is on theforward edge ofeach rudderblade. It is nec-essary to adjustthis bolt toobtain properhelm. Makingthe bolt longerproduces moreweather helm(heavy steering)and shorteningthe boltdecreasesweather helm(easier steer-ing).

    AdjustingHelmWe recommendthe followingmethods foradjusting therudders beforethe boat issailed.

    Place boat sothere is clear-ance to lowerrudders andlock down. Takea short battenor yardstick andlay the straightedge flush against the transom. Adjust thelock bolt so that the forward bottom edge ofthe rudder is about 1/2 aft of the forwardedge of the batten. (Pull rudder back lightlyto pull out any slop.) 1/2 aft is a goodstarting point, further adjustment may benecessary for personal preference.

    NOTE: As the mast is raked aft, the ruddersmust be raked forward to balance helm.

    8

  • RudderAlignmentLock both rud-ders down.Measure 22up the leadingedge of rud-ders and markthis measure-ment. Do thesame on thetrailing edges.

    Turn the rud-ders so theyare pointingdown the hullas if sailingstraight ahead.

    Measure from the centerline of the frontedge of one rudder blade (22 up) to thecenterline of the front edge of the otherblade. Do the same with the trailing edges.

    If the distance between the trailing edges isgreater than that of the front edges; length-en the tiller adjuster by unscrewing it.

    If the distance between the front edges isgreater than that of the trailing edges; short-en the tiller adjuster by screwing it in.

    One complete turn is 1/16 of an inch.

    Attach adjuster end of tiller crossbar to tiller.

    Example: If the distance between the frontedges is 75 and the distance between the

    trailing edges is 75.5; unscrew the tilleradjuster 4 or 5 complete turns and measureagain. Keep adjusting until the measure-ments are the same. You can achieve accu-racy up to 1/32 of an inch, but 1/8 is good.

    Operating the Rudder SystemThe Prindle rudders system is designed to beused underway and functions best under thatcondition. The aft force of the water facili-ties raising the rudder and when the rudderis released the water slows its fall.

    To raise the rudder, grab handle at end oftiller and pull until desired height of rudder isachieved.

    Lock line in jam cleat at end of tiller bypulling line up.9

  • To lower rudder, release uphaul line from jamcleat and pull ball at end of downhaul lineuntil lock bolt engages spring loaded pin inrudder casting.

    In operation if the rudder is pulled up too far,the head of the rudder blade will hit thewashers at the top of the casting. This couldchip your rudder blade. To prevent this, tiea knot in pull down line about 3 from ball.Adjust position of know so that the raisedrudder stops just short of hitting the wash-ers.

    MAST AND RIGGINGMastheadPrindle 15s and 18s: Masthead is assembledbefore shipping.

    Prindle 16s:To assemblyyour masthead,take the mainhalyard wireand thread eyethrough aft sideof mastheadcasting (sidewith curf).Align sheaveswith holes inmasthead cast-ing and insertclevis pins (1)through. Insertcotter ringthrough pin.

    Attach main halyard line tail to eye of mainhalyard wire with bowline. Tie off main hal-yard line and wire to the base of the mast.

    Spreaders18 only: Thespreader barsare installedonto the mastspreader basewith four 3/16x 5/8 clevispins and cotterrings. Theadjustablelength spreaderbars areattached to thefront of thespreader baseplate and theshorter bars tothe ears nearthe aft edge of the mast. Cotter ringsshould be on the bottom. Connect spreadertips with six clevis pins and cotter rings.

    10

  • The adjustable forward bar can be length-ened or shortened to adjust the amount ofsweep back the spreaders have. The morethe spreaders are swept back, thesmoother the mast bend will be, even withtight diamond wires. However the moreswept back the spreaders are the morethey will get in the way of the jib while sail-ing. There is no right or wrong in theamount of sweep back - just personal pref-erence. Be sure both sides are adjusted tothe same length.

    To measure the amount of sweep back inthe spreaders, lay a batten or yard stickfrom tip to tip. Then measure the distancefrom the curf on the mast to the batten.About 1.5 sweep back is considered nor-mal.

    Diamond Wires18 only: Attach dia-mond wires to thetangs on the sides ofthe mast.

    The fork fitting on thediamond wire isattached to the upperfitting on the mast.

    The turnbuckle onthe diamond wire isattached to the lowerfitting on the mast.The two separateturnbuckle studsshould be started intothe turnbuckle at thesame time.

    Place the diamond wire in the slot in thespreader tip with the nylon roller above thespreaders. Using one of the 9 pieces ofseizing wire, seize the diamond wires inplace so they cannot come loose. You mustwrap the tips with duct, sail or electricianstape to protect your jib from chafing.

    11

  • DANGER! SPECIAL ATTENTION: Be sureall spreader fittings are securely attached.The mast will break if the diamond wirescome loose. The mast is not covered underwarranty for breakage due to improper tun -ing, assembly or maintenance.

    Mast Rotator15 & 18: The rotatorwishbone is bolted tomast using the upperbolts fitted through thediamond tang fittings(no tangs on the 15).This fitting can remainon mast permanently.The lower bolts areused to keep the wish-bone from droppingdown onto boom.

    MasthornAll boats: Take large 5/16 shackle andthread rigging onto masthorn in this order:Trapeze wireShroudForestay pigtail (forestay of 15)ShroudTrapeze wire

    NOTES: The Prindle 18 will have double tra -peze wires on one thimble. When riggingforestay pigtail onto masthorn, the shortwire should be towards mast on Prindle 16and 18, the Prindle 15 will have the forestaywire only, no pigtail.

    Shrouds and Trapeze WiresAttach twist clip toshroud pin on deck with1/4 clevis pin. Attachtwist clip to shroudadjuster using another1/4 clevis pin. Toattach shrouds toshroud adjuster, insertshroud thimble inbetween shroudadjuster jaws and insertclevis pin throughadjuster and shroudthimble. Use one of theupper holes in theadjuster. Insert cotterring.

    Tie a trapeze ring to each of the 3 lines sup-plied. Thread the line through the thimble atthe end of the trapeze wire. Thread one ofthe plastic height adjusters onto the line,wrapping the line around it at least twice.The adjuster allows you to adjust your tra-peze height. Tie the tail of the line to theshock cord with a bowline.

    Prindle 15 and 16Single Trapeze

    12

  • Prindle 18 Double Trapeze

    Forestay and Jib HalyardPrindle 15: The forestay is already attachedto the masthorn and there is no jib halyard.

    Prindle 16 and 18: Attach the forestay tothe long pigtail (30) with a 1/4 shackle.The ring must face towards the mast.

    The jib halyard with thebrummel hooks con-nected together is leadup through the ring,through the short pigtailthimble and back downthrough the ring. Tieboth ends loosely nearthe base of the mast.

    Main HalyardPrindle 15 and 18: The main halyard ring(ring with loop welded on) is attached to themain halyard by tying the halyard throughthe welded loop with a small, compact bow-line. Attach the twisted shackle onto thering.

    Attach the main halyard ring and other endof main halyard near the base of the mast tohelp keep it out of the way while raising themast.

    Prindle 16: Main halyard has already beeninstalled under masthead section.

    RAISING THE MAST

    This photo shows the mast step and hinge.Store hinge components as shown when notin use.

    HINT: You may wish to use the split ringfrom the forestay turnbuckle on the aft pinas it is easier to install.

    Before raising the mast, the boat should beon steady level ground. If the surface is notlevel, point the bows downhill. Lengthen theforestay turnbuckle so that only 3/4 of eachthreaded stud is into the barrel. Remove theclevis pin. Note that the shackle pin takesthe place of the pin supplied with the turn-buckle.

    Uncoil and straighten out shrouds, forestay,and trapeze wires allowing them to hangover the tiller crossbar to the ground. Walkthe mast back until the base is just behindthe mast step on front crossbar. Secure thehinge to the mast base using the pin provid-ed. Attach cotter rings to both ends of hingepin to prevent it from falling out while raisingmast.

    Before lifting the mast, make sure wires willnot catch on rudders or other obstructionsand that forestay is clear and not fouled withthe shrouds.

    13

  • CAUTION!!!! Check for overhead wires before raising mast. Amast which comes in contact with electrical powerlines can causeserious injury or death.

    Prindle 15 mast step hinge in use Prindle 16 mast step hinge in use14

  • Prindle 18 mast step hinge in use

    Stand on trampoline with one foot onrear crossbar to steady yourself.

    15

  • Raise the mast to your shoulder and walkforward with it while extending arms overyour head until the mast is held by the sideshrouds.

    Attach theforestay to the1/4 shackle hold-ing the bow bridlewires together.After this initialrigging you canleave the forestayturnbuckle pre-set.

    Tighten turnbuckleuntil mast is rakedslightly aft ofstraight up. SeePerformanceTuning section foroptimum mast

    rake suggestion.If the shrouds arein one of the topholes the rig willbe a little loose.

    After hoisting themainsail we willexplain how totighten the rig.,Use a wrench orpliers to tightenthe nuts againstthe turnbucklebarrel. This willhelp keep it fromunturning.

    NOTE: Make sureto tape the turn-buckle barrel andnuts to preventthem from loosen-ing.

    Diamond WiresPrindle 18:Adjusting the ten-sion of the dia-mond wiresshould be donewith care. Beforethe sails arehoisted, but afterthe mast hasbeen stepped;adjust both dia-mond wires tothe same tight-ness. If one islooser than theother your mastwill bend more onone tack than theother.

    Push both wires towards the mast with equaltension at the same time. The wires shouldtouch the mast at least 12 above the lowerattachment point but not more than 20above.

    If the diamond wires are too tight, your mastwill not bend and undo strain will be put onthese wires.

    WARNING: If the diamond wires are tooloose the mast could break under high pres -sure loads.

    16

  • Be sure to tape the locking nuts on turn-buckles after you have adjusted the wires sothat they will not unturn. SAILING NOTE:The looser the diamond wires are the morethe mast will bend and the flatter the sail willbecome (and vice versa).

    A way to insurethat the turn-buckles on mastdo not loosen isto thread a smallline (batten tie)through the cen-ter hole in eachbarrel, tying aknot on the backside of the barrel.

    SAILS AND BATTENSMainsail battensThe Prindle mainsail has a batten betweeneach panel of cloth. The longest one is thesecond one up from the boom. The rest gofrom long to short as you progress up thesail. The 15 and 16 each have nine battens,the 18 has 10.

    Remove batten string ties from clew of main-sail.

    Fold batten string in half and loop throughbatten grommet on leech of sail.

    Insert tapered end of each batten (foamcore) or the end with rounded edges (fiber-glass) into batten pockets making sure eachbatten fits into the pocket end protector atforward edge of sail. Put plastic caps on aftend of fiberglass battens.

    Lead string up through either hole in foambatten or through end cap and down throughtop grommet and tie an overhand knot(tightly) while pushing batten into sail withthumb.

    Push batten tight enough to eliminate allwrinkles in batten pocket if using fiberglassbattens. Foam battens should be tightenough to just flop from side to side.

    17

  • Finish tying string with a square knot andtuck loose ends into batten pocket.

    Finished tie on fiberglass batten.

    Hoisting the mainsailFace your boat into the wind when raising orlowering your sails. Lay the mainsail to thebatten ends will not get caught on the tillercrossbar.

    Prindle 15 & 18:Attach the twistedshackle to themain halyardring. NOTE: Thehalyard shouldfollow the curf ofthe mast and notwrap around thehook at the mast-head.

    Attach the twisted shackle to the head of themainsail and place forward edge of sail intocurf of mast.

    With one hand, feed the sail into the curfand pull on rope tail of halyard (exiting atbase of mast) with the other.

    Make sure themast base sheave,or roller, spinsfreely while raisingthe sail. If it doesnot, you may needto file the inside ofthe mast basecasting.

    When the sailreaches the topof the mast, youmust lock thering on the hal-yard line to thehook at the headof the mast. Todo this, pull hal-yard until the ringis above thehook.

    Rotate mast (pushrotator) towardsthe starboard hull)so hook is insidering and pull downon the tack of thesail gently untilthe ring locks ontothe hook.

    Coil the extramain halyard lineand store in one ofthe pockets on thetrampoline.

    18

  • Prindle 16:Attach main hal-yard shackle intohole at head ofmainsail.

    Place forwardedge of sail intocurf of mast.With one hand,feed the curf andpull on rope tailof halyard withthe other. Pullfrom directly for-ward of mast andnot off to eitherside. This helpsto prevent hal-yard from jump-ing out of masthead sheaves.

    When the sailreaches the top ofmast, you mustsecure the secondmetal stop on thehalyard wire intothe halyard lockon the mast. DOthis by leadingwire betweenteeth on lock andpulling down onsail to put tensionon the metal stop.The other stop,further down onthe halyard wire,

    is for a reefed main only.

    Cleat main halyard off and stow extra line.

    Boom

    Remove clevis pin from gooseneck assemblyattached to forward end of boom. Connectboom to the bracket on the mast using thisclevis pin and cotter ring.

    Remove clevis in from outhaul car on aft endof boom and lift boom to aft end of mainsail.Clew ring of sail goes in between sides ofouthaul car. Reinsert clevis pin through sailand outhaul car. Install cotter ring in end ofclevis pin.

    Mast Rotator(previously installed onto mast)

    Tie rotator line 3/16 x 5) to fairlead builtinto the aluminum clam cleat, down throughthe eye in the rotator wishbone and backthrough the cleat. This provides a 2:1 pur-chase for adjusting mast rotation. 45 to 75degrees rotation is considered normal formost sailing.19

  • DownhaulTie downhaul line (3/16 x 7) to tack ring ofmainsail and lead:

    1) Through pulley on gooseneck on portside of mast

    2) Through tack ring on sail

    3) Around pulley on starboard side of mast

    4) Back through tack ring and down to cleat

    Prindle 15 and 18 Note: Lines are leadthrough inside of rotator wishbone. Amethod used by many racers to increasepurchase is to tie the line through U brack-et on gooseneck base first, lead it upthrough the tack ring, and then follow steps1 to 4.

    Mainsheet and TravelerPrindle 15 & 16:To thread main-sheet blocks (6:1purchase) layblocks on a flatsurface with thelower ratchetblock facing rightand the upperblock on rollers asshown. Feed linethrough cleat andmiddle roller(ratchet) of lower

    block and lead:

    1) Through firstroller of upperblock

    2) Up through out-side roller of lowerblock

    3) Down throughmiddle roller ofupper block

    4) Up through insideroller of lower back

    5) Through last rollerof upper block

    6) Down through fair-lead on cleat base oflower block and tie offwith a single overhandknot.

    Prindle 18: To thread mainsheetblocks (7:1 purchase)lay blocks on theirsides on a flat surface.Feed line away fromyou through cleat andratchet roller of lowerblock and lead:

    1) Towards youthrough bottom ofroller of upper boomblock

    2) Away through bot-tom roller of lowerblock

    3) Towards youthrough top roller ofupper block

    4) Away through mid-dle roller of lowerblock

    5) Towards youthrough top roller of upper block

    6) Away through top roller of lower block

    7) Tie to becket of upper block with bowline

    All boats: Install upper block to block hang-er on boom with 1/4 shackle. Install lowerblock to traveler with 1/4 shackle.

    20

  • Prindle 15 and 16: Thread loose end of mainsheet through trav-eler cleat and fairlead (mounted on swivelpedestal, rear crossbar), traveler car, andpad eye. Tie off with figure eight knot.

    Prindle 18:Tie or splice 5/16 traveler line to loose endof mainsheet and thread same as 15 and 16.

    Complete mainsheet and traveler on Prindle18

    Complete mainsheet and traveler on 16(same as 15)

    Tips on splicing from Leigh Martin: Cut thebitter end of the mainsheet off with a newsingle edge razor. Pull out 8 to 12 inches ofthe center core and cut with a hot knife (ortape, cut with a razor, and burn end). Putthe end of this core up to end of travelersheet and carefully sew them together, endto end with no overlap using a good, heavydacron-polyester thread. Feed the core andtraveler sheet back into the mainsheet coveruntil it is all smooth. Sew the traveler sheet

    into the mainsheet cover for the last 8 to 12inches. This can be done neatly by stitchingwith the weave of the braid so that yourstitches do not show. Make sure the stitchesgo through the middle of the new core (trav-eler). Complete it by turning end of themainsheet cover over the traveler sheet.

    JibPrindle 16 and 18only: Tie S hook to the afthalf of the jib halyard.This can be left onpermanently. AttachS hook to the headof the jib with a 3/16shackle. Hook open-ing must face towardmast.

    Start the zipperaround forestay wire and jib halyard line.The jib halyard is internal in the luff of jib.

    Hoist jib up, closingsipper as you do untilS hook just passesring.

    Slowly pull the jibback down at thetack (forward lowercorner) until the hookis locked in place.Note: the opening onhook should bebetween1/4 to 3/8for easiest operation.

    Unlock the brummelhooks from each otherand store extra hal-yard length in one ofthe pockets on thetrampoline.

    21

  • Lead jib downhaul linearound shackle pinand cleat downhaulline snugly into cleaton jib tack.

    Prindle 16 only:Attach two small pul-lies (attached to jibsheet line earlier) tofoot of jib by leadingeach one around thefront of the mast, one

    from each side.Put a 1/4shackle throughgrommet inlower aft cornerof jib (clew)and reattachpullies with

    shackle pin.Make sure thatthese lines arenot twisted.Pull up slackfrom line lead-ing between thejib sheet blocksand trampoline.

    Prindle 18 only:Tie jib clew blocks to sail clew rather thanwith shackle. Use one of the 3/16 x 3 7lines. Tie one block to each end.

    Jib Sheet andJamPreventerUsing the extra7 piece ofshock cord sup-plied attach thecenter to themast and tieeach end to dolphin striker bar on oppositesides of mast. Be sure the jib sheet is leadoutside shock cord. This will keep the jibsheet from catching under mast base.

    Rigged boat ready to sail.

    Righting LineIt is recommendedthat you alwayscarry a rightingline on your boat.A grommet andpouch are on thetrampoline to facil-itate this. You willneed a line at least14 long and 3/8or 7/16 in diame-ter. Tie a figureeight knot about9 from one end.Insert the taildown through thegrommet in tramp by the mast and tieanother figure eight knot on this end. Youmight also find it useful to tie knots on theline every fewfeet so your wethands do notslip when right-ing the boat.Coil the line andstore it in apouch untilneeded.22

  • Tightening the rig tensionAfter the boat is completely rigged with sailsup and mainsheet connected, it is time totighten the rig. You should not attempt todo this by yourself or if it is windy until youhave done it several times.

    Turn the boat untilthe wind is blow-

    ing from a 45o

    angle to the bow.Ease the travelerout to the lee sideand sheet themain in tight.Have your crew siton the trampolineto keep the main-sheet fromuncleating and theboat from tipping.With the mainsheeted to lee-

    ward, the leeward shroud will be loose.Move the shroud down a couple of holes onthe adjuster, but not all the way down.Replace clevis pin and ring. Loosen main-sheet.

    Turn the boat so the wind is coming from theopposite side. Ease the traveler out to whatis now the lee side and sheet in. The newleeward shroud will be loose. Move theshroud down to the corresponding hole inthe adjuster as the first shroud. If the rig isstill loose, move the shroud down one or twomore holes and repeat with the other sideuntil the rig is fairly tight and both shroudsare in the same hole on the adjuster.

    It is possible to over-tighten the rig whichwill make the mast hard to rotate.

    When you take the boat apart, be sure toloosen one side only before taking the maindown. By leaving one shroud in the correcthole, you will only have to tighten one sidenext time you go sailing.

    If you are not happy with the mast rake youhave, simply lengthen or shorten theforestay turnbuckle. Be sure to leave atleast 10 complete threads into each side ofthe barrel.

    SECTION II: Sailing

    Sail TrimTo Weather

    The main traveler should be centered withthe main and jib sheets in snug. Be carefulnot to pull the sails in too tight. If the mainis oversheeted (too tight), the mainsail willbe too flat and the boat will not move veryfast.

    If the jib is over-sheeted it will stopthe air flowingbetween the leechof the jib and themainsail. This gap(slot) between thejib leech and themainsail should beabout 12 inchesnear the top of thejib.

    The jib tell-tale onthe leeward andwindward sidesshould be streaming back. If the windwardtell-tale on the jib is flopping forward youshould head the boat downwind a little. Ifthe leeward tell-tale is flopping forward, youshould head the boat into the wind a little, orif you do not want to head up any further, letthe sail out a little.

    23

  • Reaching

    The main traveler should be set a few inchesfrom center with the main sheet snug andthe jib sheet slightly looser than used whengoing to weather. This will allow the dis-tance between the main and the jib toincrease. Both sails should be sheeted in sothat both the leeward and windward tell-tales are streaming back.

    Downwind

    Let the main traveler all the way out to theend of the crossbar and sheet the mainloosely. Do not let the main out far enoughto rub against the shrouds if at all possible.Trim the jib sheet loosely trying to keep thewindward and leeward tell-tales streamingback.

    If your boat is equipped with a barber hauler,see Section V - Tuning for Performance forinstructions regarding its use.

    Downhaul SystemsThe luff of both the main and jib should bepulled down tightly to pull all the wrinklesout when sailing. You have to be quitestrong to over-downhaul themainsail, so give ita hard pull. Youcan easily over-tighten the jibdownhaul, so justpull hard enoughto get wrinkles.

    Notice the diagonalwrinkles in the luffof both the mainand jib. Both sailsshould be down-hauled until theydisappear.

    TRAPEZINGLacing the HarnessUsing bowlines, tie eachof the lines supplied ontothe bottom inside grom-mets. Lace back andforth loosely and tie ahalf hitch at the top out-side grommets.

    Put the harness on. Itshould be slightly loose.Most people find a tightlylaced harness uncom-fortable. Slip the web-bing over your head.Feed the lines through the webbing grommet

    from the backside, thenfeed one through eachbackside of top grom-met near hook. Tieends together using anoverhand knot. Do notuse a square knot. Thewebbing over yourshoulders should fittightly. The tighter it isthe more it will supportyour back and shoul-ders.

    24

  • Trapeze PositioningWe recommend that you practice going outon the trapeze on shore before you try itwhile sailing.

    Before hooking up, pull the dog bone downand see if it will reach the trampoline. Thelowest ring should almost reach the outsideedge of the trampoline. If it does not, adjustthe length using the height adjuster.

    Sit on the side of the hull just forward of theshroud. Pull the dog bone down and hookthe uppermost ring onto the harness hook.

    Lean back until you are being supported bythe trapeze wire. Hold the jib sheet in yourback hand.

    Bring your forward leg out, put foot on rail.

    Now bring your aft leg out and put that footon the rail. Slowly straighten your legs out,keeping your feet two feet apart. Lean back!Do not hold onto the handle as you couldunhook yourself.

    When trapezing on a reach, move yourweight back on the hull to keep the bows up.

    LAUNCHINGAlways launch with your bows into the wind.There are two basic wind conditions that willaffect the way you launch:

    Onshore - (wind blowing from the water towards the land)

    25

  • Offshore - (wind blowing from the landtowards the water)

    Before leaving the beach, make sure that therudders are up all the way, the main traveleris out all the way, both sheets are loose andthe hiking stick is on the windward side ofthe boat.

    Onshore

    Push the boat off at a 45 to 60 degree angleto the wind until it floats, jump on and sheetin the jib (only) tight. (Do not sheet in themain yet.) This will pull you out at a goodangle until you can safely drop your rudders.

    As soon as water is deep enough, drop andlock both rudders, bring traveler to centerand sheet in main. Youre off!

    This method can be used when very light off-shore winds are blowing. Otherwise use thefollowing method.

    Offshore

    Look to make sure it is totally clear whereyou will be backing.

    Walk boat out backwards until it is floating.Give boat a big shove and jump onto thebows. Keeping the transoms out of the

    26

  • water, have the crew hold jib clew out as farforward as necessary to fill jib with air andkeep boat moving backwards. Keeping thetransoms out of the water will keep the boatmoving straight out. When you are far outenough (usually about 100 feet) let the jibgo, move to the proper sailing positions,drop rudders down, sheet in both sails andgo.

    TACKINGBefore starting your tack, be sure you aresailing to weather with good speed (sheetedin and traveler centered). Do not attempt totack while sailing on a reach.

    Make a smooth turn to windward using aboutone half the amount of rudder throw.Turning the rudders too sharply will stall theboat and bring it to an abrupt stop.

    When the bows are pointing into the wind,release the main sheet 1 or 2 feet. Leavethe jib cleated.

    The skipper should now move aft, into thecenter, and swing the hiking stick to the newside. Do not straighten the rudders out. Ifyou do, you will find yourself into irons(boat pointing directly into wind making noheadway).

    Leave the jib cleated until the boat is on itsnew heading. When the main pops to thenew side, release the jib, bring it acrossquickly and sheet in. Keeping the jib on thewindward side is called backwinding. Ithelps pull the bows around until your tack iscompleted.

    While the crew is sheeting in the jib, theskipper should be sheeting in the main andmoving to the proper position on the wind-

    27

  • ward side of the boat. Tack is now complet-ed.

    NOTE: If you end up in irons you will startto drift backwards. While sitting on theweather hull, uncleat the main and push theboom to leeward. Backwind the jib and pushthe tiller away from you. This reverses therudders and allows the boat to sail back -wards. Leave them reversed until the bowsare pointed in the direction of a close reach.Release the jib, straighten the rudders andsheet both sails in quickly.

    JIBINGWhen sailing downwind or on a broad reachyou must jibe. To do so, first check newdirection to be sure it is clear of other boats.

    The skipper should move aft and to the cen-ter of the boat while turning the rudderabout 1/3 of the full throw.

    Swing the hiking stick to the opposite side,placing the end aft of the rear beam and for-ward of the tiller arm. Keep the ruddersturned by holding onto the tiller crossbar.

    When boat is heading straight downwind,grab the sheets between the main blocksand pull the sail across. BE SURE TO KEEPLOW AS THE BOOM CROSSES THE BOAT.

    When the main fills on the opposite side itmay snap across so be ready for it. Haveyour crew bring the jib to the new side.Move to the side of the boat and pick up thehiking stick.

    BALANCEYour Prindle Catamaran will sail faster andeasier if it is sailed on its lines so that thewater flows across the hull as it wasdesigned to do.

    28

  • Note how the transom is almost under waterand the bows are very high. The sailors aretoo far aft - MOVE FORWARD!

    Bows are too low and transoms are too highout of the water. Sailors are too far forward- MOVE AFT!

    Trim fore and aft here is good, but there istoo much weight on one side for the light air.Move the crew to the middle or leeward side.

    When balance is proper, the leeward bow will

    be between 6 and 12 inches out of the waterand the weather hull will just touch thewater. The idea is to sink the leeward hulldeep into the water, thereby using the hull toreduce side slippage.

    RIGHTINGEven the best sailors flip occasionally, so pre-pare your boat for the inevitable. Install arighting line according to instructions inSection I - Assembly.

    The boat will losespeed as it raisesup on one hull andusually flips overslowly. Sit downon the flat surfaceof the hull.

    Ease yourselfdown to the bot-tom hull usingthe mast as astep.

    It is important toget off the top hullquickly to preventthe boat fromturning upsidedown (turtle). Donot jump off theboat as currentand wind may notallow you toreturn to it.

    29

  • The skippershould uncleatthe main whilethe crew uncleatsthe jib.

    The crew shouldreach around thefront crossbar forthe righting lineand throw it overthe top hull.Make sure thebows are pointinginto the wind.

    If the mast ispointed into thewind, the boatmay flip over inthe other directionas you try to rightit. To swing bowsaround into thewind, walk backtowards the tran-som slowly untilbows are posi-tioned properly.

    Be careful not toshift your com-bined weight toofar forward or aftas this may causethe boat to rolland turn turtle.

    Standing evenwith the frontcrossbar, theskipper and crewshould grab therighting line andlean backwards.Knots in the linehelp keep yourhands from slipping. If you are single-hand-

    ing your boat,carry your jib bagon board. Grabonto the rightingline, scoop up abag of water andhold it over yourshoulder whileleaning back. Thisextra weightshould allow youto right the boat.

    An alternativemethod is to tie aloop in the end ofthe righting line

    and attach theloop to your tra-peze harnesshook for moreleverage.

    Once the tip ofthe mast comesout of the water,the boat will rightquickly. Be sureto hold onto therighting line untilyou can grab theboat and pullyourself up. Theboat will now be

    pointing directly into the wind and movingslowly if at all. Stow the righting line back inthe pouch and you are sailing again!

    REEFINGUnlock the main halyard and lower the main-sail down about 4 feet. Lock the lower metalstop on the halyard wire into the halyardlock on the mast. The sail should now beabout 4 feet short of being fully hoisted.Downhaul the luff using the ring in the reefpatches.

    30

  • Attach the outhaul car to the aft ring.Starting with the bottom batten, roll theextra sail up and tie with two 2 foot pieces ofline using the reef points (grommets) in thesail. Do now tie around boom.

    Reefed sail on a Prindle 16.

    SECTION III:AFTER SAILING

    Loosening the rigBefore you lower your sails, you must loosenthe rig tension using the mainsheet and trav-eler method (explained in Section I -Assembly). With the wind coming from thebow at a 45 degree angle, travel the main allthe way out to the leeward corner. With thecrew sitting on the trampoline, sheet themain in tight. The lee shroud should becomeloose.

    Move the shroud up to the second to the top

    hole in adjuster, insert pin and ring anduncleat the main. You do not need to loosenthe other shroud. Leave it in the proper sail-ing position and you will know where toplace the loosened shroud the next time yougo sailing.

    Lowering the sailsPoint your bows into the wind. Uncleat themain downhaul and disconnect the boomfrom the mainsail.

    To lower the jib, uncleat the jib downhaul.Rehook the jib halyards together with brum-mel hooks. Hoist the jib slightly until Shook is just above the ring and quickly pullthe jib down by the tack.

    NOTE: If the jib does not lock or unlock thefirst time, try again. Remember the hookmust face aft and to hoist the S hook justabove the ring. Pull down slowly to lock andquickly to unlock.

    Lower the jib and tie the jib halyard at thebase of the mast. Use the downhaul cleatfor this purpose. Pull the lines tight to keepthem from flapping while trailering. Leavezipper open with the zipper car at the headof the sail. If it is allowed to go to the bot-tom, it may fall off.

    Fold the jib in half and start rolling from themiddle.

    31

  • Roll tightly withoutany folds. If it iswindy, put the jibunder the hikingstrap to keep itfrom blowing awaywhile you lowerthe main.

    To lower the mainon the Prindle 15and 18, hoist themainsail up as faras possible androtate mast awayfrom sail tounhook main hal-yard. This rotation

    should be towards the side of the mast thatthe hook is riveted onto. The object to turnthe headboard and ring away from the hookenabling the sail to be lowered past thehook.

    NOTE: The best way to do this is to haveone person pull the sail up and rotate themast using the rotator wishbone while some -one else pulls the clew of the mainsail in theopposite direction than the mast is rotated.The person hoisting the sail lets the halyardgo and pulls down on the tack while keepingthe mast rotated.

    Once the sail has dropped a couple of inchesbelow the hook, let the clew and rotator goand drop the sail.

    NOTE: Be sure to have a knot tied in theend of the halyard to keep it from goinginside the mast.

    After the main is down, attach the twistshackle to the rotator bar and pull the mainhalyard firmly and tie off.

    To lower the main on the Prindle 16, hoistthe mainsail up as far as possible and itshould release from the halyard lock. Letthe sail drop.

    After the main is down, store the shackle inthe curf on the mast, pull firmly on the mainhalyard and wrap the line around the mast

    (below the shrouds) 3 or 4 times. Cleat offusing the main halyard cleat.

    Roll the main starting with the second orthird batten from the top. Roll smoothly andtightly. Stop when you get to the next tothe last bottom batten.

    Insert the rolled jib and continue rolling.

    32

  • Wrap and tie downhaul line around rolledsails.

    Place sails in long mainsail bag. Your jib bagcan now be used to carry other miscella-neous items.

    We strongly recommend that you store yoursails in this manner rather than folding themas they will last much longer.

    Unfasten the lower main block from the trav-eler car and the traveler line. Tie the out-haul line tail to the lower main block shackleand coil the excess mainsheet. This keepeverything from becoming tangled in stor-age.

    Trailering

    Place the boat on the trailer. Tie the boatdown using at least 1/4 nylon or dacronline. DO NOT TIE ANYTHING TO THE DOL-PHIN STRIKER OR ROD. Remove the rudderblades from castings. Be sure they aremarked port or starboard so you don nothave to retune them the next time you gosailing.

    Attach mast hinge to the mast. With oneperson on the trampoline, push the mast for-ward and disconnect the forestay shackle.DO NOT undo the turnbuckle. Rig shackle soit holds the two bow bridle wires together.Check in back of boat to make sure you willnot be lowering the mast onto a person, car,or power line.

    CAUTION - Extreme caution must beobserved when launching and sailingnear overhead wires. A mast near awire could be fatal!33

  • The second person should move to the backto catch the mast as it is lowered.

    While the second person holds the mast,remove the hinge pin and walk the mast for-ward until you can place it in the front mast

    support on the trailer. Store hinge in downposition.

    Place the top of the mast in the rear mastsupport making sure the mast does notextend beyond the rudder castings. Trailerthe Prindle 15 and 18 with curf up to preventdamage to rear support padding and mast.DO NOT trailer with the Prindle 18 mast onits side. The bouncing will put excess shockloads on the spreader assembly.

    Secure the mast and support to the boat bywrapping the tie down line around the masttwice and down through the trampolinegrommets. Store the tiller under a hikingstrap or jib lead line to keep it from flappingaround. Tie a 3 or 4 foot piece of line to thetraveler pad eye, around the tiller crossbartwice, and through the fairlead and cleat.This will keep the rudder castings fromswinging. Tie the front end of the mastdown making sure to wrap line twice herealso.

    There are several ways to store your riggingwhile trailering. Here are two popular meth-ods.

    34

  • #1 Tie a 6 foot line to the front mast sup-port. Bring all shroud and trapeze wires for-ward to the front support and tie the linearound them.

    Lace the forestay through the back lace lines2 or 3 times. Store trapeze dogbones undertrampoline to keep them from bangingaround. You may wish to tie the wires up offthe front crossbar to keep them from rubbingon a long trip with a line over the mast.

    #2 This method is not recommended if theboat is stored outside during the rainy sea-son. Remove both hatch covers and feedshrouds and trapeze wires into each hull.Store forestay as in method #1.

    With any method you use, the importantthing is to keep all rigging separate and tan-gle-free.

    Store the jib sheet by tying or shackling thejib clew blocks to the bow bridle shackle.

    Pull the jib sheet snug and cleat each side.Store the extra line in the halyard pouch orloop around hiking straps.

    SECTION IV:Maintenance

    Dolphin StrikerThe single most important maintenance pro-cedure is done on the dolphin striker. ThisMUST be kept snug at all times with no playbetween the vertical rod and the bar. Thinkof the dolphin striker as the backbone ofyour boat.

    To test the snugness of your dolphin striker,grab the aluminum bar between the side andthe rod, push upand then pulldown. If you canmove it more than1/4 you musttighten the rod.

    To tighten therod, first loosenthe nylon mastbearing (half-round ball on topof mast step).

    35

  • Loosen screw atbottom of strikerrod.

    Turn dolphinstriker rod clock-wise using awrench and theflat spot on therod designed forthis purpose untilthe bar is snugagain.

    Retighten thenylon ball andscrew.

    The bolts thatconnect thestriker bar to thefront crossbarshould be loos-ened occasionallyto check forcracks in thecrossbar. Ifcracks are appar-ent, the crossbarshould bereplaced. Thereis a back-upplate inside thecrossbar so thesebolts can betightened easilyfrom the outside. Again, do not overtighten,since the bolts could snap.

    BATTENSPrindle 16 and 18 Catamarans are equippedstandard with solid fiberglass battens. Theseare virtually unbreakable but do requiresome attention.

    Make sure that battens are inserted all theway into the batten pocket with tapered endinside the stop at the luff of the sail. If it isnot, the batten may tear the sail. The bat-tens should extend about 1-1/2 past theend of the batten pocket. You may wish totrim them to this length.

    Loosen battens when storing the sail formore than a few weeks or during extremetemperature changes. This relieves pressureon the sail and battens and will preserve thelife of both.

    Foam/Fiberglass BattensRace equipped Prindle 16 and 18s and allPrindle 15s are equipped with foam/fiber-glass battens. These battens are much soft-er and more fragile requiring more care.

    Occasionally, a delamination may occur atthe tapered end where the foam narrowstowards the tip. To repair, spread the glassand foam apart slightly and coat with 5-minute epoxy, clamp tip together, and letharden. This repair should be stronger thannew.

    Take care when rolling a sail with foam bat-tens. If the sail is rolled unevenly and bat-tens are allowed to twist they will hold thetwist. This may hamper your sail shape.You can however, remove this twist byremoving the batten from the sail and twist-ing it in the opposite direction and holding itfor a moment or two. The batten shouldspring back fairly straight.

    GENERAL MAINTENANCE TIPSAfter your second sail on your PrindleCatamaran and periodically thereafter:

    1) Tighten the 8 crossbar bolts. This is very important as most of the strain on the boat is concentrated on these bolts.

    2) Check all shackles (shrouds, forestay,etc.) and other fasteners (including nuts and bolts on blocks and cleats). Tighten where necessary.

    3) Check all hardware attached to hulls (bow tangs, shroud pins, gudgeons) for tight-ness. Do not over tighten.

    4) Cut off excess length on solid fiberglass mainsail battens leaving 1-1/2 past aft edge of sail.

    36

  • HullsCheck for leaks at all hull fittings by coveringthese areas with detergent and blowing air(from your lungs) into drain plug hole. DONOT USE A VACUUM CLEANER AS THEEXCESS PRESSURE CAN DAMAGE THEHULLS. If detergent bubbles, there is a leak.Remove fitting and cover area with clear sili-cone sealant and replace.

    RuddersRub paraffin on the inside of casting whereblade slides to ease operation. To fine tune:remove uppermost bolt on casting and paraf-fin. If there is slack between sheaves adda washer on nut end of bolt. Insert andtighten. This will help keep lines of sheaves.Remove bolt which holds top of spring andrub with paraffin. If rudders do not kick upeasily: pull spring to loosen tension andreplace bolt. Paraffin lock pin. Sand allrough edges on blades lightly. Alwaysremove blades for trailering.

    SailsRub paraffin on the luff of mainsail to easehoisting. Sail tape should be applied to bat-ten pockets where it hits shrouds to avoidchafe. Always fold your jib and store it inthe envelope bar or roll it - DO NOT JUSTSTUFF IT IN BAG. Roll your main front thethird batten (from top) to your boom andstore in long boom bag. Storing your sailswill greatly lengthen their life. Rinse thefresh water whenever possible.

    NOTE: Howe and Bainbridge, Inc., the man-ufacturers of our sail cloth have sent us thefollowing memo which we felt was importantenough to pass on to you.-- To prevent color transfer on your sails, drythem as thoroughly as possible after using.Try not to store wet in sailbag for any longerperiods of time than necessary.

    When either dyed nylon or dacron sailfabrics are stored wet, the color will bleed ortransfer form the colored to the white oreven from a darker shade to a lighter shade.The wetter and more compressed the fabric,the greater the bleeding - such as stuffed ina sailbag. --

    SECTION V: TUNING FOR PERFORMANCE

    Mast Rake:

    To measure the amount of mast rake, yourmast must be up with your rig tension snug.Lay a carpenters level on the trampoline justaft of the hatch. Adjust the boat until it islevel fore and aft and relatively level fromside to side. Attach a one or two poundweight (a heavy wrench will work) onto themain halyard. Using the main halyard as aplumb, measure the distance from the aftedge of the mast at the black band to thecenter of the plumb. This distance is howmuch mast rake you have. We recommendbetween six and ten inches of aft rake. Youmay find that you prefer slightly less ormore.

    MAST ROTATIONThe Prindle 15 and 18 come equipped stan-dard with an adjustable mast rotation control(wishbone device on the mast). For mostsailing this rotation should be set between60 and 75 degrees from straight back. Agood rule of thumb is to have the wishbonepointing at the shroud when you are sailingto weather. As you ease the traveler out,the rotation will automatically increase sothat it should be between 80 and 100degrees for downwind sailing. When sailingto weather, an increase in rotation will flattenthe mainsail and less rotation will make themainsail fuller.

    37

  • BARBERHAULERA barberhaulersystem works likea traveler for thejib and is used forbroad reachingand downwindsailing. It isoptional equip-ment. This sys-tem is generallyused to get thatextra edge whileracing and is notnecessary for pleasure sailing. The barber-hauler will pull the clew of the jib out to theend of the front crossbar which will give it aslightly better shape and make it easier totrim properly.

    SECTION VI:SUPPLEMENTAL INFORMATION

    Masthead Head

    Mast

    Diamond Wire

    Luff

    Leach

    Batten

    Mainsail

    ClewBoom

    Rudders

    Mainsheet

    TransomRear Crossbar

    Trapeze WireShroudKeel

    Waterline

    Bow

    Tack

    Front Crossbar

    Jib (16 & 18)

    Forestay

    Spreader (18)

    FootTiller

    38

  • GLOSSARY OF TERMS

    Aft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . toward or near the rear part of the boatAsymmetrical . . . . not symmetrical. On Prindle hulls - flat on one side, curved on the otherBatten. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . thin, narrow strip of material used to stiffen the shape of a sailBeat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . to sail to windwardBlock . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . roller or pulleyBoom. . . . . . . . aluminum tube that holds the foot of the mainsail and attaches to the mastBow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . the forward part of the hullCapsize . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . to turn the boat overCleat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . device which secures a line or rope by jamming or tying offClew . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . lower, rear corner of sailClosed Hauled. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . sailing close to the eye of the windCrossbar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . aluminum tube connecting two sides togetherCurf . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . grove in boom, mast or crossbarDiamond Wire . . . . . . . . . . . wire that attaches to mast and spreader to control mast bendDownhaul . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . line used to pull down the tack of a sailDownwind. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . sailing away from the windEye of the Wind . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . exact direction the wind is blowing fromFoot . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . bottom edge of sailFore & Aft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . from the bow to the sternForestay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . forward wire supporting mastGooseneck . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . fitting connecting the boom to the mastGrommet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . metal ring set into a sailGudgeon. . . . . . . . . . fitting bolted through transom of hull for attaching the rudder systemHalyard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . line or wire used to hoist and lower sailHarness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . a support worn while hooked to trapeze wireHead. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . top of sailHead Off . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . to steer the boat away from the windHead to Wind . . . . . . also referred to as in irons - pointing the bows directly into the windHead Up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . to steer the boat into the windHelm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . tiller which controls the ruddersHike . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . to position weight as far as possible to windwardHoist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . to pull upIn Irons. . . . . . . . . . heading directly into the eye of the wind, unable to tack or go forwardJibe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . also gybe, to change course of boat without tackingLee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . side falling away from the windLeech . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . back edge of sailLee Helm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . tendency of boat to turn away from the windLeeward . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . side away from the windLine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ropeLoose Footed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . mainsail not held to a boom for its entire lengthLuff . . . . . . . . . . . leading edge of sail, or flagging of sails due to improper trim or headingMast . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . aluminum tube used to support sailsMast Rake . . positioning the top of the mast fore and aft in relation to straight up and downOuthaul . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . system used to pull clew of mainsail away from the mastPintel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . pin which holds rudder casting onto gudgeonsPort . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . the left sideReaching. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . to sail across the direction of the windReefing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . to reduce sail areaRigging. . . . . . . . . . lines, wires and spars used for support and operation of mast and sailsRudder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . wing shaped devies used to steer the boatShackle . . . . . . U shaped fitting with removable pin used to fasten lines or parts together

    39

  • Sheaves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . roller or pulleySheet. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . lines used to control sailsShroud . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . wires on each side of boat supporting the mastSpreader . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . strut projecting from side of mast to brace diamond wireStarboard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . the right sideStern . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . back of hullTack. . . . . . . . . . . . to turn the bow by having the bows cross through the eye of the wind,

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . or lower forward control of the sailTell Tale. . short pieces of ribbon or yarn attached to sail or rigging for reading wind directionTiller Extension . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . device which controls rudder steeringTrampoline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . material stretched between hulls and crossbars to sit onTransom . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . aft most end of the boatTraveler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . car which rolls width of rear crossbarTrim. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . to adjust sheet tension, or to balance hulls in water

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . so they function to maximum efficiencyTurnbuckle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . threaded fitting for adjusting wire lengthUpwind . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . to sail into the windWeather . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . to sail to windwardWindward . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . side toward the wind

    GLOSSARY OF KNOTS

    Figure eight

    Reef knot or square knot

    Cleat half hitch

    Two half hitches Double overhand knot

    Bowline

    Truckers hitch

    40