EGN Magazine Issue 10

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The publication of the EGN magazine, which is published twice a year detailing geotourism promotion provides another mode of publicity through its distribution to geotouristic enterprises as well as schools and universities.

Text of EGN Magazine Issue 10

  • europeanGEOPARKSeuropeanGEOPARKS

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    The 190The 190thth Session Session of UNESCOs Executiveof UNESCOs ExecutiveBoard and GeoparksBoard and Geoparks

    Outcomes from Outcomes from

    1111thth European Geoparks Conference European Geoparks Conference

    at Arouca Geopark (Portugal)at Arouca Geopark (Portugal)

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    EuropeanGeoparks Network

    MagazineIssue No 10 / 2013

    Published by:Natural History Museum of the LesvosPetrified Forest on behalf of the EuropeanGeoparks Network

    Executive editor:Nickolas Zouros

    Editorial board: Heinz Kollmann, Tony Ramsay, Jutta Weber, Nickolas Zouros

    Contributors:Tony Ramsay, Nickolas Zouros, PatrickMcKeever, Agostinho de Abreu e S,Margarete Patzak, Andreas Schller, AloiaAniello, Masumi Sakamoto, Martin Koziol,Luis Alcal, ngel Hernndez, Timo Kluttig,Mike Sweeney, John Galloway, GandolfoLibrizzi, Pasquale Li Puma, FrancescoChiaramonte, Rita Umbriaco, HeinzKollmann, Irmi Auer, Jutta Weber, CassianSchmidt, Elizabeth Pickett, Stphane Legal,Isabel Reuter, Dan Grigorescu, AlanBowring, Carlos Neto de Carvalho, HelenaCouto, Manuel Valrio, Baldomero MorenoArroyo, Alicia Serna Barquero, MelanieBorder, Margaret Wood, John Conway,Koumoutsou Eleni, Topouzidis Nikos,Daniela Rocha, Alexandra Paz, Asier Hilario,Leire Barriuso, Zoanetti, V. Mas, G.Bazzoli, Alessia Amorfini, AntonioBartelletti, Giuseppe Ottria, Eamon Doyle,Vesa Krkki, Alessandra Casini, RiccardoCinelli, Georgia Kitsaki, HaritakisPapaioannou, Panagiotis Paschos, JacekKozma, Manfred Kupetz, Alberto Gil Toja,Rafael Prez de Guzmn Puya, InmaculadaCuenca Bonilla, Jean-Luc Desbois, Jos MBarrera, Javier Lpez, Gerlinde Ortner,Hans P. Schnlaub, Ferran Climent Costa,Cristina Rubio Segura, Barnabs Korbly,Anna Knauer

    Editing: Tony RamsayPublication manager: Antonis GeorgiouPrint: Epikinonia S.ACover photo: Geolodia 11 (2011), anational geological outreach initiativelaunched in 2005 in the Maestrazgo Geopark

    Copyright: The magazine and all the con-tributions and illustrations contained there-in are protected by copyright. No part ofthis magazine may be copied or repro-duced without the written approval of thepublishers. This also includes commercialreproduction as an electronic data baseand copying on cd rom. c 2013

    Foreword

    Magazine 10 celebrates and provides an overview of the range of activ-ities and achievements in the life of the European Geoparks Network(EGN) in 2012. These include the festival of European Geoparks Week,the highly successful 11th European Geoparks Conference and the addi-tion of three new geoparks, Central Catalunya Geopark Spain,BakonyBalaton Geopark Hungary, and Lesvos Geopark - Greece. Theprogress in transforming the Global Geoparks Network into a UNESCOGlobal Parks Initiative is also reported. The 11th European Geoparks Conference with the theme Geoparks: AContribution for a Smart, Inclusive and Sustainable Growth was held inArouca Geopark, Portugal, between 19 -21 September, 2012. The con-ference was attended by 324 delegates from 42 countries. Of the 152abstracts published in the Conference Proceedings, about 81% weredelivered at the conference, and about 29 % were presented as posters.The meeting also included an educational workshop entitled In & Out,and the event Geo-expo12 designed to promote social, cultural andenvironmental sustainability, ran in parallel with the Conference. On thelast day participants had the opportunity to visit some of the most impor-tant geosites of the Arouca Geopark.The European Geoparks Network and the Global Network of NationalGeoparks (GGN), created under the auspices of UNESCO, share commonaims. These are to address socio-economic problems including stagnanteconomic development, high unemployment and demographic issuescreated by a combination of ageing populations and depopulation in ruralareas. They also aim to educate the wider public about the Earth sci-ences and to foster sustainable local economic development through theconservation of their geological, natural and cultural heritages. In this issue articles contributed by three new and two recently createdgeoparks introduce their territories and demonstrate the progressalready achieved in realizing the aims of the EGN and GGN. These arti-cles are examples to aspiring geoparks because they show that thesefive regions already functioned as geoparks before becoming EGN/GGNmembers. Articles by 31 of the Networks established geoparks demon-strate how they raise public awareness of the geosciences and theimportance of geo-conservation. They also describe their involvement ingeotourism linked to scientific research, education, art, working withlocal communities and business people. The inclusion of the contributionby San Kaigan Geopark, Japan is an example of international coopera-tion between geoparks in the GGN. EGN Magazine 9 (2012) reported on how the significant achievementsand progress of the Geoparks initiative was acknowledged at the 36th

    UNESCO General Conference in September 2011 and on the need foradditional work required towards the process of converting the Global

    Geoparks Network into an International UNESCO GeoparksInitiative. The cooperation between UNESCO and the GGN

    received further consideration at the 190th Session of UNESCOsExecutive Board in October 2012. During this session UNESCOunanimously approved Item 5 of the provisional agenda 190EX/5, Part I ADDENDUM on Geoparks. Encouraged by theprogress made in defining a potential structure and mech-anism for a UNESCO global geo-parks initiative, the 190thSession of UNESCOs Executive Board in October, 2012invited the Director-General to review the implications ofaccepting sites already designated under the existingGlobal Geoparks Network criteria and to report back tothe 191st session in April 2013. The Global GeoparksNetwork now has approximately four months inwhich to prepare its final position for transformationinto the UNESCO Global Geoparks Initiative. The past year has been a time for change in theEuropean Geoparks Network Structure. ProfessorPatrick McKeever, the EGNs Vice-Coordinator wasappointed Chief of Section, Global EarthObservation Secretary of the IGCP, EES/GEO,Natural Sciences Sector/Bureau 5.08, UNESCOand Andreas Schller, Vulkaneifel Geopark,Germany is now the EGNs Vice-Coordinator. Wecongratulate, Andreas and Patrick and wish themevery success in their new roles.

    Tony Ramsay, Member of the Editorial Board

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  • 04 UNESCO and GeoparksEuropean Geoparks Network Activities

    06 11th European Geoparks Conference

    08 Key Priorities of Europe 2020 Strategy:Application to the European Geoparks09 The Arouca Declaration

    10 The European Geoparks Week 2012Raising awareness of climate change, geo-logical hazards and intangible heritage

    11 12th EUROPEAN GEOPARKS CONFERENCE4 6 SEPTEMBER 2013 - Cilento and Vallodi Diano Geopark, (ITALY)

    Global Geoparks Network

    12 Sightseeing, Dining, Learning:The Fascinating Sanin Kaigan Geopark13 Global Geoparks Network capacity buildingactivities International Intensive Course on

    Geoparks 2012

    14 Scientific exchange programme BetweenGlobal Geoparks Mt. Lushan (PR China)& Global Geopark Bergstrasse-Odenwald(Germany)

    Geoparks Activities

    15 The sites and services of RokuaGeopark16 Scottish Geoparks and the ScottishGeodiversity Forum highlight the impor-

    tance of Geodiversity in the 21st Century

    17 Film Festival on the landscape in theMadonie Park18 TERRA.GENESIS A 3D - Video Animation explaining the local earth

    history to a wide public

    19 Vulkaneifel Geopark: How did the VolcanicTheme Park Mosenberg in BettenfeldOriginate?

    20 Breathing geology for years in MaestrazgoGeopark21 Haeg Dinosaurs Geopark, RomaniaA place of integrated approaches22 Luberon Geopark, SE FranceSustainable development at your fingertips23 Massif des Bauges Geopark, FranceExploring Time on the Creusates geosite

    (Saint-Franois de Sales)

    24 Three very special Geosites in theTuscan Mining Geopark25 Vikos - Aoos Geopark Bridges that connectroutes and cultures26 The European Geoparks Network today

    28 Sierra Subbetica Natural Park:The role of the Geopark enterprises in thepromotion of the geological heritage

    29 The best of Eisenwurzen:Water for the Austrian capital30 Fforest Fawr Geopark Ambassadors:Ambassadors for Geo-conservation31 The Trilobites Tour in Portugal:Developing the first geotourism itinerary

    dedicated to palaeobiodiversity

    32 The Green Way of Sierra Norte de Sevilla:A convenient access to enjoy the landscapeand geology of the Geopark

    33 Copper Coast Geopark:The New Community Centre34 New equipment in the Arouca Geopark:The House of Rocks Delivering Stones35 Basque Coast Geopark - The importanceof geological Research for a high quality

    geotouristic programme

    36 Tal der Heiligen ReiserA gap in the history of the Earth37 Scientific Research in Adamello BrentaGeopark38 Peatland Matters - North Pennines AONBand European & Global Geopark39 Rocca di Cerere Geopark LEARNGEO..PLAYING A simple but effective way

    to know our Geopark

    40 GeoMon, Angleseys Geopark, hosts majorResearch Workshop41 The scientific cooperation in the VilluercasIbores Jara Geopark42 Whats a Volcano? Give me some info!

    43 Education in Chelmos Vouraikos Geopark

    44 ApuanGeoLab: an educational window onthe Earth Sciences45 The Limestone Terraces of the Burren:Steps to climate change education46 The Geopark Carnic Alps of AustriaNew Members

    47 The German-Polish Geopark MuskauArch: Realizing the recreational andeducational Potential of an Ice Age andIndustrial landscape

    48 The Geopark of Central Catalonia, Spain

    49 BakonyBalaton Geopark: A geologicalwonderland in western Hungary50 From the Petrified Forest Geopark to theLesvos Geopark51 Geopark Conferences

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    CO The 190th Session of UNESCOs

    Executive Board

    UNESCO and GeoparksThe cooperation betweenthe Global GeoparksNetwork (GGN) andUNESCO was considered atthe 36th UNESCO GeneralConference in September2011. The Draft Resolution of doc-ument 36 C/14, adopted bythe UNESCO ExecutiveBoard was presented duringthe session at the ScienceCommission by the AssistantDirector General of theSciences Sector GretchenKalonji. This meeting recog-nized the impact thatGeoparks have made as ini-tiatives of UNESCO throughtheir outreach and success-ful bottom-up approach.The session concluded withthe adoption of the DraftResolution of document 36

    C/14 (36 C/Resolution 31), acopy of which was publishedin European GeoparksMagazine 9 in 2012.However, despite acknow-ledging the Geoparks signi-ficant achievements andprogress, it was recognizedthat further work wasrequired in order to improvethe Geoparks chances ofconverting into anInternational UNESCOGeoparks Initiative. In the section Requests theDirector-General of theDraft Resolution it was pro-posed that options forarrangements for a formalpartnership with the GGNshould be assessed andreported back to theExecutive Board at its 190thsession.

    New decisionThe cooperation betweenUNESCO and the GlobalGeoparks Network receivedfurther consideration at the190th Session of UNESCOsExecutive Board in October2012. During this sessionUNESCO unanimouslyapproved the decision pro-posed in the new document190 EX/5, Part I ADDENDUMon Geoparks (190EX/Decisions). In this docu-ment UNESCOs Director-General reports back toMember States on the consul-tations undertaken during thefirst half of 2012 on how toimprove cooperation betweenUNESCO and the GlobalGeoparks Network as well ason possibilities of formalizinggeoparks within UNESCO.

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    The role of Geoparks andtheir communities in imple-menting an innovative strat-egy of sustainable develop-ment through educating thewider public about geologi-cal hazards, global climatechange and encouragingdebate on the conservationand use of the geological,natural and cultural her-itages is acknowledged.However, the fact that thecurrent ad hoc cooperationbetween UNESCO and geop-arks does not allow eitherorganization to capitalize onthe potential benefits of amore formalized affiliation isalso recognized. In this respect the potentialfor increasing the coopera-tion between UNESCO pro-grammes (Man and theBiosphere, World HeritageConvention and theInternational GeoscienceProgramme) and the GGN isacknowledged. UNESCO is the only UnitedNations organization work-ing in the field of earth sci-ence. It is therefore oppor-tune that UNESCO strength-ens the organizations linkwith the GGN through aUNESCO Global GeoparksInitiative. By adding no additionalcosts to UNESCOs existing

    programmes, it is recog-nized that this initiativewould continue to be drivenby the geoparks innovativebottom-up approach. Based on the observationsabove, UNESCO proposes toinvestigate the possibility ofinitiating the brandsUNESCO Geopark andUNESCO Global GeoparksInitiative as labels of excel-lence for areas that meetthe criteria of, and join, theUNESCO Global GeoparksInitiative.

    It is acknowledged thatUNESCO Geopark brand-ing would strongly con-tribute to raising UNESCOsvisibility in the world andadd value to UNESCOswork. It would allowUNESCO to take the lead ina high quality network ofpublic outreach on sustain-able development linked toissues including the environ-ment, geohazards, climatechange and the sustainableuse of natural resources,thus supporting the delivery

    of some of UNESCOs coreobjectives. This brandingwould also assist in estab-lishing geoparks in regionswhere none exist.Encouraged by the progressmade in defining a potentialstructure and mechanism fora UNESCO Global GeoparksInitiative, the 190th Sessionof UNESCOs ExecutiveBoard in October 2012 invit-ed the Director-General toreview the implications ofaccepting sites already des-ignated under the existingGlobal Geoparks Networkcriteria and to report back tothe 191st session in April2013.The Global GeoparksNetwork now has approxi-mately four months in whichto prepare its final positionfor transformation into theUNESCO Global GeoparksInitiative.

    Tony RamsayFforest Fawr Geopark

    Wales, UK

    Nikolas Zouros Lesvos Geopark

    GREECE

    Patrick McKeever,Margarete Patzak

    Global Earth ObservationSection

    Division of Ecological and EarthSciencesUNESCO

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    The latest developments regarding the establishment of a closer cooperation between the GlobalGeoparks Network (GGN) and UNESCO were presented during the opening ceremony of the 11thEuropean Geoparks Conference by Prof. Patrick J Mc Keever, Chief of Section, Global EarthObservation of Unesco. On the panel during the opening ceremony members are (from left to right):Melchior Moreira, President of the Porto and North of Portugal Tourism Entity Margarida Belm,President of the AGA- Arouca Geopark Association UNESCO Board of Directors Lino Ferreira,President of the Executive Commission of Oporto Metropolitan Area Jos Artur Neves, President ofthe Arouca Municipality lvaro Santos, Head of Cabinet of the Secretary of State Assistant to theMinister of Economy and Regional Development Katalin Gnczy, Political reporter EuropeanCommission Artur S, Chair of the 11th European Geoparks Conference Antnio de Almeida Ribeiro,President of the Portuguese Commission for UNESCO Patrick McKeever , Chief of Section, GlobalEarth Observation, UNESCO, Nickolas Zouros, Coordinator of the European Geoparks Network

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    The 11th EuropeanGeoparks Conference wasa successful scientificevent. It was held in theArouca Geopark, Portugal,during September 19th-21st, 2012. This confer-ence was attended by 324delegates from 42 coun-tries. The highest numberof participants came fromPortugal (58), France (30),Italy (20) and Spain (21).The 11th European Geo-parks Conference alsoattracted participants fromoutside Europes frontierswith 16% of the attendees

    coming from Brazil, Africa,North America and theAsian-Pacific region.The main theme of theconference was Geo-parks: A Contribution for aSmart, Inclusive andSustainable Growth,reflecting the main aims ofthe European Strategy2020. Launched in March2010, the EuropeanStrategy 2020 aims, overthe next decade, to helpEurope to emerge success-fully from the current eco-nomic crisis. The 11thEuropean Geoparks Confe-

    rence was an opportunityfor Geoparks to reflect ona sustainable path forgrowth that will contributeto prosperity and socialprogress for the next years

    Outcomes from the 11th

    European Geoparks Conference at Arouca Geopark - Portugal

    Local residentsinvolvement in folk dancing

    AroucaGeopark

    fieldtrip visitsthe Rocks

    giving Birth toStones geosite

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  • in Europe. In total 152 sci-entific communicationswere accepted by the sci-entific committee andwere published in theAbstracts Volume of theConference Proceedings.About 81% of these were-delivered at the confe-rence, and about twenty-nine were presented asposters. In the afternoonof the second day of theconference an educationalworkshop entitled In &Out took place. On thelast day of the conferencethe participants had theopportunity to visit someof the most importantgeosites of the AroucaGeopark.The main venue was loca-ted in the AroucaSecondary School,in thecentre of the town ofArouca. This new facility inthe Arouca Geopark wasused for the first time as the venue for an inter-national conference.Therefore, students and

    teachers were involved inthe opening and closingceremonies of this interna-tional meeting. TheCultural Programme of theConference welcomed theparticipants at manyevents outside the mainvenue of the Conference.Local people joined in thecultural activities andenjoyed the thematic vis-its, dinners and folkdances.Geo-expo12, aiming topromote social, culturaland environmental su-stainability, ran in parallelwith the Conference anddisplays were presented at51 stands: 16 standsfocused on geoparks andother touristic destina-tions; 28 were concernedwith local and regionalproducts; 5 standsinvolved trades and indus-tries and 2 focused oneducational projects.

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    Daniela Rocha, Artur Abreu S

    [email protected]

    The 30th EGNCoordinationMeeting inAroucaMonastery

    Plenary sessionof the 11th EGN

    Conference

    Trilobitesof Arouca

    The Rocks giving Birth

    to Stones geosite

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    Key Priorities of Europe 2020 Strategy:

    Application to theEuropean Geoparks

    Ladies and gentlemen,

    I am very pleased to address all of you on theoccasion of the 11th European GeoparksConference.And I want to thank the coordinator of theEuropean Geoparks Network, Nicolas Zouros,and the Director of the Agency for the develop-ment and Enhancement of Heritage, HervPassamar, for their leadership and their strongcommitment to preserve and promote Europeangeological and cultural heritage.The successful dynamic of the EuropeanGeoparks Network is really impressive. From 4territories in 2000, it now includes 43 territoriesacross 17 European countries and attractsincreased attention from communities acrossEurope as well as from the wider geologicalcommunity.In fact I am not surprised by such a success.Your active involvement in supporting sustain-able economic development of Geopark territo-ries has never been so crucial.More than ever we need to pool efforts andwork together to stimulate growth, to createjobs, to promote regional economic develop-ment and to strengthen social cohesion.We do share the same objective. We want a bet-ter future for the young generations. That is afuture where everyone will be given a chance todevelop one's skills and where everyone will bemore respectful of our fragile environment.Building such a future is about capitalizing onour strengths to help tackle our current biggestproblems.And our geological and cultural heritage is cer-tainly one of these strengths.It has a positive spill-over effect on a wide rangeof businesses, as for example in the field oftourism one of the sectors of the economythat has been performing well throughout thecurrent economic crisis.It also greatly contributes to the reinforcementof social and territorial cohesion, and the cre-ationof jobs.That is why the preservation and the promotionof such heritage is a sound investment in amore sustainable, fair and creative future, in linewith the objectives of the Europe 2020 Strategy,our European blueprint to get the economy back

    on track over the course of the decade.As you know very well, education, research andinnovation are at the very heart of this strategy;which can only succeed if there is a strongsense of shared ownership and active involve-ment from all the stakeholders throughoutEurope.And the Arouca Geopark that hosts today con-ference is precisely a good illustration of such anactive involvement. It shows how science, edu-cation and geotourism activities can improvelocal economy while reinforcing cultural identity.Indeed, all of you here today, you represent theincredible variety and richness of our naturaland cultural heritage.But all of you here today, you are also demon-strating the solidarity of Europe's territoriesbehind a common objective: to build together astronger and more united Europe while respect-ing its diversity.Your commitments will certainly enable Europeto have a more sustainable, smart and greengrowth.And you can count, as always, on the EuropeanCommission's support- notably through ourcohesion policy- to implement a wide range ofprojects from protecting cultural heritage andpromoting tourism-related activities to protect-ing biodiversity and developing renewable ener-gies.Just to give you one example: for the period2007-2013, the European RegionalDevelopment Fund has allocated 3 billion forthe protection and preservation of cultural her-itage, 2.2 billion for the development of cultur-al infrastructure and 775 million to support cul-tural services.Ladies and gentlemen,Let me conclude by sending you my best wish-es for a very fruitful conference.Such a gathering is always a good occasion fora reflection on the progress achieved so far, forexchange of experiences and best practices. Butmost importantly, it is an occasion to reflect onthe way forward, on new ideas, new projects,new ways of organizing. And it is exactly whatis most needed in these very challenging times:an entrepreneurial spirit, an openness tochange while respecting our core values andheritage.

    I thank you for your attention.

    Jos Manuel Duro BarrosoPresident of the European Commission

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    The modern phenomenon ofthe highly successful GlobalGeoparks movement was ini-tiated in Europe in the late1990s by four geologicalparks one each in France,Germany, Spain and Greece coming together to devel-op the Geopark model withfinancial assistance from theLEADER Programme of theEuropean Union and with thesupport of the EarthSciences Division ofUNESCO.The Geopark model devisedby those four pioneers iden-tified geoparks as a tool forEarth Heritage protectionand sustainable local devel-opment. The geopark modelstipulated that geoparksmust contain internationallyimportant geology that wasprotected and managed topromote geotourism for thebenefit of the local economyand to educate people aboutthe evolution of their locallandscape.The European Geoparks con-cept was presented to awider audience at a confer-ence held in Maestrazgo inSpain in 2000 when interest-ed regions in Europe weregiven the opportunity toapply for European Geoparkstatus under the auspices ofUNESCO. It was clearalmost immediately from theenthusiastic reaction of theconference delegates thatthe European Geoparks ini-tiative promised to be verysuccessful.Subsequently, in the follow-ing year 2001, eightEuropean regions were thefirst places in the World tobe recognised as Geoparks.These early European

    Geoparks proved to be theforerunners of what is todaya hugely successful World-wide network of GlobalGeoparks in many countries,with many more aspiringgeoparks in every continen-tal region.Global Geoparks have con-tinued to operate with thestrong support of UNESCO,although not as an officialUNESCO programme akin toWorld Heritage or Man andBiosphere. Many peopleboth within UNESCO andwithin many internationalorganisations, national gov-ernments and geoparks nowbelieve that the time is rightto form even closer linksbetween UNESCO and GlobalGeoparks for their mutualbenefit. Consequently,UNESCO is carrying out adetailed review of its rela-tionship with the GlobalGeoparks Network to identi-fy the best way forward.Representatives of the 52Global Geoparks in Europemet recently at the 30thMeeting of the CoordinationCommittee of the EuropeanGeoparks Network in theArouca Global Geopark inPortugal on 18th September2012. The CoordinationCommittee very much wel-comed the increasing levelsof support for GlobalGeoparks within UNESCOand hoped that the presentstrong relationship betweenthem would be strengthenedeven further in the nearfuture.In particular, the CoordinationCommittee advocated thatGlobal Geoparks should betotally and exclusively underthe umbrella of UNESCO,

    with the Global GeoparksNetwork and UNESCO work-ing together in tandem tocontinue the development ofGlobal Geoparks around theworld.At the same time, theCoordination Committeeagreed that the core valuesand established practicesthat are fundamental to thesuccess of Global geoparksshould be perpetuated. TheCoordination Committee alsoagreed that it was importantto retain the bottom upapproach to developinggeoparks that has been fun-damental to the successfulestablishment of GlobalGeoparks as a world-widephenomenon that enjoystremendous grass rootscommunity support. The Coordination Committeealso wished to see the pres-ent well-tested and costeffective quality controlmeasures andinspection/revalidation pro-cedures retained for all exist-ing or aspiring GlobalGeoparks. Lastly, theCoordination Committeewere anxious to ensure thatfuture Global Geoparksshould only be accepted onmerit and not because ofany political pressures or anyother inappropriate consid-erations.Signed on behalf of theCoordination Committee ofthe European GeoparksNetwork, which, on 18thSeptember 2012, includedthe official representatives ofthe 52 member geoparksfrom 18 countries.

    EUROPEAN GEOPARKS NETWORK

    The Arouca Declaration

    European Geoparks NetworkCoordination Committee

    18 September 2012

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    During late May and earlyJune 2012, the members ofthe European GeoparksNetwork celebrated theirannual Geoparks Week andshowed how their regionalgeology contributes to andcan inspire community life ingeoparks. Although geologyis the focal point for theniche market of geo-tourism,geology and earth historyalso inspire artists and musi-cians to work with naturalmaterials or to capture thesound of the Earth.Excursions and special lec-tures on phenomena innature and exhibitions whichattracted people who want toknow more about theprocesses that created ourplanet rounded off the activ-ities during the GeoparksWeek.Educational programmes areone of the most importantcomponents and many geo-parks cooperate with univer-sities and schools to promote

    and raise the understandingof landscape - buildingprocesses. Increasingly pro-grammes for Geoparks Weekdeal with the challenges forthe future, including climatechange, geological hazardsand protecting a territorysintangible heritage and manyactivities were designed toincrease awareness of theseissues. In some regions peo-ple need to know how to pro-tect themselves in case ofearthquakes, however, in allregions individuals need tobe aware of the potentialthreats arising from globalwarming and the contribu-tion they can make to reducethe consequences. A geo-parks intangible heritage isfrequently linked with itsgeological, natural and/orhistorical heritage and forthis reason geoparks striveto preserve this gift from thepast for future generations.The activities in GeoparksWeek 2012 demonstrate

    once again the high level ofecological and social respon-sibility that has arisen ingeoparks since the initiationof the geopark concept in2000. Participants also learned ofthe important role that geo-parks play in promotingtourism through intensivenetworking with touristentrepreneurs, tourist guidesand all other tourism serviceproviders in their regions. The European GeoparksNetwork provided a total of760 activities and eventsduring Geoparks Week 2012.Nearly 80.000 people tookthe opportunity to participatein one of the lectures, exhibi-tions, excursions or festivals.As in previous years, a largeamount of promotionalmaterial was distributed toraise the profile of geoparksas regions of sustainabledevelopment.

    Raising awareness of climate change, geological hazards and intangible heritage

    The European The European Geoparks Week 2012Geoparks Week 2012

    Andreas [email protected]

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    12th EUROPEAN GEOPARKS CONFERENCE 4 - 6 SEPTEMBER 2013

    Cilento and Vallo di Diano Geopark

    Cilento and Vallo di DianoGeopark has the honor ofhosting the 12th EuropeanGeoparks Conference, dur-ing a period in which theglobal development strate-gies of the Earth Sciencesassume an important role inthe world. Climate changeand associated geo-hazardswill affect all human activi-ties and may strongly deter-mine humanitys future. Theaims of the 12th EuropeanGeoparks Conference, areto show how Geoparks candevelop innovativeapproaches for raising publicawareness of geohazards,climate change and the sus-tainable uses of geo-resources. Therefore, beginning withthe concept the ConferenceRaising Public Awareness,the Programme will comprisegeneral sessions on the maintopics: Geohazards,Climate Change andSustainable uses of geo-resources, each with relatedthematic oral sessions withinvited speakers together

    with selected oral presenta-tions and poster sessions onResearch, Education andDissemination experiencedin or proposed for the Globaland European GeoparkNetwork.The specific aims of the con-ference are:1. To confirm how Geoparkscan and will focus on the sci-entific knowledge of thesephenomena in the academiccommunity.2. To understand howGeoparks address theseissues in the educational sys-tem.3.To publicize the role ofGeoparks in raising publicawareness of climate changeand geohazards as well asthe sustainable use of natu-ral resources.The 12th European GeoparksConference will be held inAscea-Velia-Elea, a villagelocated along the coast ofthe Cilento, Vallo Diano andthe Alburni National Park-Geopark in the Campaniaregion of southern Italy.Present day, Ascea is a mod-ern, touristic village sur-rounding the ArchaeologicalPark of the ancient Greekcity Elea, renamed asVelia by the Romans, oneof the cradles of westernphilosophy and civilization,associated with the philoso-phies of Parmenides andZenone, and recently desig-nated as a UNESCO WorldHeritage Site. The long and complexAscea-Velia-Elea history rep-resents the first cultural,social and economic global

    network in the ancientworld and provides a realparadigm of cohabitationbetween human society andgeo-hazards. In fact, sinceits foundation, the townexperienced natural disas-ters due to landslides, inun-dations, earthquakes, andprobably tsunamies whichinfluenced its social andeconomic development.Tradition tells us howParmenides, a naturalphilosopher, understood thenature and dynamics oflocal geohazards, who asteacher raised publicawarenes and, finally, as apolitical thinker suggestedplanning and design meas-ures for mitigating naturalrisks.

    Cilento and Vallo di DianoGeopark in ITALY is pleasedto invite you to participate inthis conference.

    A view of thebeautiful

    Cilento coast

    For more information onthe conference pleasecheck our homepage:http://egnconference2013.cilentoediano.it

    Or contact Aniello [email protected]

    [email protected]

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    Genbudo cavewith superbexamples of columnar jointed basalt

    The Sanin Kaigan Geopark islocated approximately in thecenter of Japan, facing theSea of Japan. The Geoparksmain theme is geological fea-tures, the natural environ-ment, and peoples lives relat-ed to the formation of the Seaof Japan.In the Sanin Kaigan Geopark,there is a wide variety of geo-logical and topographical fea-tures related to the formationof the Sea of Japan.Genbudo, a basalt cave withbeautiful columnar joints, isthe place where reversed geo-magnetic polarity was firstdiscovered. Genbudo Cave isconsidered as an internation-ally important scientific site.The areas coastlines are bestobserved from the sea duringboat tours. Heated under-ground water gushes outthrough many faults in ourGeopark, and the area ishome to many hot springs,which attract many visitors.Due to the meeting of coldand warm currents, the Sea ofJapan provides great fishinggrounds, particularly for snowcrab, The region is alsoknown for Tajima cattle, thebreeding cattle of the famousKobe beef. Landslide mor-

    phology is utilized for terracedrice paddies, creating aunique landscape and thesource of delicious rice. Thearea is also blessed with purewater used to produce goodsake. In addition to these tra-ditional products, local peopleare also actively trying todevelop new geo-gourmet,food that uses ingredientsderived exclusively from theGeopark.Children receive educationconcerning the environmentand natural disasters.Teaching materials to raiseawareness of the Geoparksuch as karuta (a traditionalJapanese playing card) arealso being developed. A sub-sidy system for research feessupports academic research inthe Sanin Kaigan Geopark. The Sanin Kaigan Geopark islaying the groundwork for asystem that will promote theprotection and conservation ofgeological resources and thesurrounding environment. Thebreeding and conservation ofOriental White Storks (IUCNRed List) is one of the mostremarkable examples of natu-ral conservation. Downstreamof the Maruyama River thatruns through the Toyooka

    Basin, the valley narrowsforming a bottleneck that pre-vents the transport of sedi-ments. This provides idealconditions for marshes.Although these marshes wereonce home to the storks, theybecame extinct in Japan in1971 as a result of the use ofagricultural chemicals andother damage to the environ-ment. However, due to the efforts(organic agriculture, restora-tion of wetlands) of local citi-zens and governments, thestorks started breeding in thewild again. Now they areeffectively used as a model forenvironmental education, abrand symbol (rice, sake) andtourism. The lower MaruyamaRiver and the surrounding ricepaddies were designated as aRamsar site in July 2012.

    Oriental white storks

    Masumi [email protected]

    The Fascinating Sanin Kaigan Geopark

    Sightseeing, Dining, Learning:Sightseeing, Dining, Learning:

    Location of theSanin Kaigan

    Geopark, Japan

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    The 5th InternationalIntensive Course on Geo-parks, was delivered from 3-14 September 2012 inLesvos under the auspices ofthe GGN Bureau. This sum-mer school was organisedand hosted by theGeography Department ofthe University of the Aegeanand the Lesvos PetrifiedForest Geopark.This years theme wasGeoparks: nature heritageprotection and management,sustainable tourism and localdevelopment. The Coursewas funded by theOperational Programme"Education and LifelongLearning" of the EuropeanSocial Fund.The Course was designed forGeoparks staff members,postgraduate students inves-tigating Geopark manage-ment, geotourism, geocon-servation and sustainabledevelopment of rural areas,as well as for stakeholdersand members of local com-munities of protected areasand aspiring Geoparks. Thisyear, the participants camefrom Japan, China, Iran,Turkey, Hungary, Spain,Portugal and Greece andconstituted a very interestingand challenging mix with alarge variety of professional

    backgrounds, but with acommon passion for conser-vation and utilization of thespecial local heritage in theirrespective areas.A large number of stimulat-ing lectures were presentedby university professors andresearchers with long experi-ence in geoheritage, geodi-versity management and thedevelopment of alternativesustainable geotourism, fromFrance, Portugal, Germany,Spain and Greece.Furthermore, the partici-pants had the opportunity topresent their areas and theactions of geoconservationand education in their homeinstitutes and to discuss newideas and best practices inthe sustainable protectionand promotion of local her-itage and identity.During several field trips, theparticipants had the opportu-nity to see the LesvosPetrified Forest Geopark andexperience its infrastructureand activities, and also tovisit the most importantmonuments of the islandsgeological, historical, reli-gious and cultural heritage.They walked along thepaths of Theophrastus andAristotle, where they metwith stakeholders and hadthe opportunity to discussthe important role played bythe local communities in theprotection of the local naturalheritage and cultural identity.The interest shown and thebroad international participa-

    tion in the courses organisedduring the past 5 years hasresulted in the establishmentof Lesvos as the location foran annual InternationalIntensive Course onGeoparks. The Course con-tributes significantly to theexchange of experience,knowledge and fresh ideas inthe fields of Geopark man-agement, geoconservationand promotion of geot-ourism, between some of theoriginal Geoparks, new mem-bers of the European andGlobal Geoparks Networks,stakeholders interested inthese fields and young scien-tists. Most importantly, thisthemed meeting of peoplefrom all over the world playsa vital role in the develop-ment and expansion of theGeoparks Network and inspreading the spirit of coop-eration and mutual supportamong rural regions aroundthe globe.

    Participants visiting and

    interprpetingtectonicgeosites

    during theIntensive

    Course

    Visiting the oliveoil museum in Agia Paraskevi

    Global Geoparks Networkcapacity building activitiesInternational Intensive Course on Geoparks 2012

    Training the futureGeoparks staff in LesvosGeopark

    Nikolas Zouros [email protected]

    K. [email protected]

    INTERNATIONAL INTENSIVE COURSE

    ON GEOPARKS 2013

    25 June 4 July 2013 Lesvos island Geopark - Greece

    https://geoparks2013.pns.aegean.gr/

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    Huang Tao, Che Ling Chaoand Liang Gao Cheng couldnot hide their amazement felting rocks from wool, a seaof rocks, forest art , touchand feel boxes, plantingactivities, planning exhibi-tions, infrastructure, projectdevelopment, manned infor-mation booths and calligra-phy. All this and much moreawaited the three invitedguest scientists from theGlobal Geopark Mt. Lushan(PR China) during their visitas part of an internatio-nal exchange programme.Global Geopark Bergstrasse-Odenwald, has collaboratedfor five years with theirChinese partner, the Directorof the Hermannsh ofBotanical Garden and theInternational Forest ArtAssociation.The collaboration betweenthe participating institutionsresulted from intensive con-tacts with the Chinese part-ners. In this context, the firstinternational forest art trailThe Poetic Forest was cre-

    ated in China as part of the3rd International Forest ArtConference. Since then, thetrail has become a magnetfor Chinese and internationalvisitors. The depth of thefriendship between the twogeoparks was evident duringa visit by a delegation fromthe Mt. Lushan BotanicalGarden. Over sixty yearsago, Chinese Redwoodseedlings planted in theHermannshof BotanicalGarden, produced a closerelative growing in girth andheight since the early 1950s. In addition to the compre-hensive information andtraining programme, whichtook the guests to all cornersof the region, the topicsForest Art and ChineseRedwood also played animportant role. An informa-tion panel in German, Englishand Chinese was unveiled infront of the InternationalCentre for Forest Art inDarmstadt, providing visitorsto our region with an impres-sion of the Poetic Forest on

    Mt. Lushan. At theHermannshof, another infor-mation panel was unveiled inthe presence the former gar-dener in the Hermannshof,who had planted the tenderRedwood seedling. The highlight of the visit wasthe Geo-Naturepark Day, afestival, attended by 2500people, involving numerousregional and internationalpartners. Here, together withour Geopark rangers, theChinese colleagues present-ed their region and provideda demonstration of the aes-thetic art form of calligraphy.The final unanimous verdicton the exchange: fascinat-ing, very instructive andinformative! The exchange programmewill be continued and theGlobal Geopark Bergstrasse-Odenwald will contribute as atutor in the InternationalStudent Summer School onMt. Lushan.

    Scientific exchange programmebetween Global Geoparks Mt. Lushan (PR China)

    & Global Geopark Bergstrasse-Odenwald (Germany)

    Jutta Weber [email protected]

    Cassian SchmidtUte Ritschel

    (a) Unveiling ceremonies ofthe PoeticForest (b) andRedwood panels

    Chinese colleagues

    presenting theInternationalBooth at theGeopark Day

    Felting rocks - a favourite geo-educationalactivity

    (b)(a)

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    The area of Rokua Geoparkwas laser scanned by theNational Land Survey ofFinland in spring 2011. Thisvery accurate elevation datacovering the whole area isnow used in several informa-tion and educational productsto explain and promote theGeopark. The Geological Survey ofFinland published the RokuaGeopark Geological OutdoorsGuide in May 2012. Theguide and its maps weremade using the elevationdata. The elevation data havealso been processed into adetailed panoramic map cov-ering the Geopark area. Thepanoramic map is used in the

    n e w

    brochures andoutdoor informationpanels describing theGeopark and its main sitesto the visitors. The Interactive PanoramicMap was published on theGeoparks web site in Finnish

    and English in August 2012.The map presents the areatogether with photographs,video and text. Three inbuilt3D maps offer the possibilityto explore the area and itsgeological formations indetail. The 3D models coverthe core areas of theGeopark, Rokua esker anddune area, rivers Oulujokiand Muhos, and the LakeOulujrvi recreational area. The Geopark has also initiat-ed cooperation with localschools to provide them withthe opportunity to use theseproducts in education. Theschools have for examplesuggested adding short videopresentation clips to theinteractive panoramic mapplatform. These new prod-

    ucts offer the Geoparknumerous ways to

    explain andp r o m o t e

    t h e

    area and its features. Thenew products also offer thevisitors a better way to visu-alize the area and plan theirvisit in advance.

    The Interactive PanoramicMap can be explored throughthe internet site: www.rokua-geopark.fi

    The sites and servicesof Rokua Geopark

    Vesa [email protected]

    A 3D model of the Rokua

    Esker

    The panoramic mapof Rokua Geopark

    An example of aninformation panelshowing the positions ofgeosites in theGeopark

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    Geopark Shetland andNorth West HighlandsGeopark have been work-ing closely with the ScottishGeodiversity Forum to raisethe profile of geodiversitynationally and highlight itsimportance in facing thechallenges of the 21st cen-tury.The Scottish national forumfor geoconservation groupsand geoparks involves aca-demics,geological societiesand other related organiza-tions and interested indi-viduals including the BritishGeological Survey, NationalMuseums Scotland and the government agency

    Scottish Natural Heritage.The Forum promotes therole and value of geodiver-sity in education, communi-ty development, health andwellbeing, tourism and thewider economy and seeksto raise the political profileof geodiversity and to influ-ence local and national po-licy.Forum Chairman AngusMiller said Many peoplehad felt for some time thatScotlands geodiversity wasconsistently underrepre-sented in, and often absentfrom government policieson matters where it shouldbe recognised has having

    paramount impor-tance. And there isalso the feeling thatScotland, of allplaces, should shoutabout our amazinggeodiversity andcelebrate its links tohistory, the way welive now, and thedevelopment ofgeological science.Consequently theForum came intobeing to try toaddress these issuesand encourage peo-ple to understandwhy the value ofgeodiversity is sosignificant. Webenefit from a rangeof resources andprocesses suppliedby natural ecosys-tems with importantproducts like cleandrinking water.Whilst biodiversityhas a vital role to

    play, and is protectedaccordingly, geodiversity,which underpins all eco-systems services and isvital to our understandingof how they work and howwe can protect them, tendsto be overlooked.To redress this balance, theForum has developed aGeodiversity Charter forScotland, to raise aware-ness of geodiversity and toencourage government,local authorities, compa-nies, organizations andindividuals to work togeth-er to integrate geodiversityinto policy, decision makingand guidance to deliversustainable management ofland and water. TheCharter defines geodiversi-ty as the variety of rocks,minerals, fossils, land-forms, sediments and soils,together with the naturalprocesses which form andalter them. It is the linkbetween biodiversity, land-scape, people and their cul-ture.The Charter was launchedat Holyrood in Edinburgh inJune 2012 by ScottishMinister for Environmentand Climate ChangeStewart Stevenson MSPand was attended byShetland MSP Tavish Scotton behalf of GeoparkShetland.

    For more information aboutthe Scottish GeodiversityForum visit http://scottish-geodiversityforum.org/

    Scottish Geoparks and theScottish Geodiversity Forum highlight the importance ofGeodiversity in the 21st Century

    ScotlandsGeodiversity

    Charter

    Robina [email protected]

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    The Madonie Film Festival isa unique event of its kind inthe Italian national scene,involving the entire popula-tion of the Madonie Geopark.It takes place every year, andis organized by the G. A.Borgese Foundation, toappreciate the landscapethrough interweaving therelationship between litera-ture, cultural heritage andthe landscape which is inex-tricably linked to geologicalevents. This interweavingsprings from GiuseppeAntonio Borgese, a well-known antifascist critic,writer and journalist of thefirst half of the twentiethcentury. This year, the tenthanniversary of the establish-ment of the Foundationnamed after him, marked the130th anniversary of his birth

    and the 60th anniversary ofhis death. The film competi-tion linked to the event, nowin its third year, broughttogether 55 works, includingexamples from Nepal,Norway, Switzerland, Franceand Spain. But participants inthe event appreciated theholistic approach, to thepast,present and future(defined as PPF by theEGN), which was expressedin the numerous fringeevents including excursions,readings, concerts and out-door performances of plays.The six works selected forthe section called The land-scape, to be preserved forthe common good, involvedvideos which concentratedon places and communitiesand on different interpreta-tions of the landscape inrelation to life. These fullyexpressed the universal con-cept of every human beingsright to beauty. This is a rightthat the European GeoparksNetwork and GlobalGeoparks Network, throughall the current 91 membersdistributed in 27 countries,seeks to affirm through sci-entific studies and the appre-ciation of the landscape andnature. The eleven worksselected by the section called

    The human face as a land-scape that recounts meet-ings, involved films thatrecounted meetings betweenpeople and gave voice andlight to the many humanfaces of our everyday land-scape. Faces are bearers ofstories, thoughts and feel-ings which we all too oftenchoose to ignore, possiblybecause of differences inrace or religion. These differ-ences, however can be thestarting points, as they werefor those who initiatedGeoparks, to furtherUNESCOs, aim to promoteunderstanding and sharingbetween peoples.

    Film Festival on the landscape in the Madonie Park

    Gandolfo Librizzi [email protected]

    Pasquale Li Puma [email protected]

    Reading and lis-tening to the

    most beautifulpages by G. A.

    Borgese on topof the Monte

    Carbonara (at1979 metres

    above sea level) and enjoying

    the view of theMadonieGeopark

    The communityliving in theMadonie Geoparkhas succeeded infinding, throughconcerts and theatrical performances in anatural setting,the fundamentalprinciple ofUNESCO, aimed at understandingand sharing

    The FilmFestival on the

    landscape ofthe Madonie

    Geopark 2012,emphasized the

    relationshipbetween

    landscape, geological

    history, tangible

    and intangibleheritage

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    The geological processesthat create a landscape areoften difficult to understandfor non geologists. The enor-mous duration of geologicalperiods and the massivechanges involved in thenature and geographicalposition of the landscapethrough time make it impos-sible for many people tounderstand the history of theenvironment they live in.TERRA.vita has produced a20 minute 3D computer ani-mation that provides anintroduction to the localEarth history by explainingthe climatic changes thattook place in the region aswell as the tectonic move-ments and erosion processesthat formed the land surface.The geology of theTERRA.vita Geopark includesa sedimentary sequence witha detailed record of 300 mil-

    lion years of Earth historyand a variety of geologicalstructures. The geology is,however, made easily under-standable for members ofthe general public throughthe provision of explanationswhich are both simple and ofhigh quality. The new animation is basedon four structural elements:Block diagrams show anoblique aerial view of thewider Geopark area. In thisview large scale processessuch as flooding, the formingof sediments or the spread ofvegetation are explained. The second element containslandscape impressions. Forsome geological periods,more detailed presentationswere necessary to explainthe individual circumstances.For these times, close-ups ofplants, animals and rocks areillustrated, sometimes in

    films, in other cases as fixedimages. The second part ofthe animation uses a simpler,sketched animation toexplain the huge tectonicmovements, the selectiveweathering and the erosionprocesses, that gave the sur-face its final shape. Finally,some sequences describemore complex processes,e.g. the forming of an end-moraine. For this reason theproduction of more precisedetailed animations was nec-essary.The computer animation isbeing used in various con-texts. It is available on theGeoparks websitewww.naturpark-terravita.de,and has been given to schoolsto be used for educationalpurposes and to museums toshow in their exhibitions.

    TERRA.GENESISA 3D - Video - Animation explaining

    the local earth history to a wide public

    Timo [email protected]

    A cross-sectionshowing thestructural geology and a topographicprofile in theGeopark

    A landscape inthe TERRAvita

    Geopark duringCretaceous times

    TERRAGenesis 1 the nature ofthe landscape

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    Quarrying the volcanicdeposits in Mosenbergended in 1993. According toGerman legislation, quarriesmust have an exit strategy todeal with these sites at theend of their working life.This usually involves fillingthe excavation followed byplanting to restore the orig-inal surface. Natural geolog-ical outcrops and quarriesare windows into the Earththat reveal fascinating sto-ries about the origin andevolution of the rocks. Forgeologists such insights areimportant! Quarrying atMosenberg exposed volcanicchimneys, lava flows withcrystals of various sizes andvolcanic slag consisting offragments of basaltic lavaand cinders. Here visitorscan see a perfect and largecross-section through a sco-ria cone! This is so uniquethat in 2006 the Mosenbergvolcano group was,included,together with the Meerfelder

    Maar, in the list of the 80best "Geotopes ofGermany". In 2000, the community ofBettenfeld together with themunicipality of Manderscheidand the MaarmuseumManderscheid began to con-sider how to make thisquarry accessible for geo-tourism. Conveniently the"GeoRoute Vulkaneifel aroundManderscheid" leads directlyto the quarry and the region-al "Eifel Trail and LieserHiking Trail" is not farremoved from this site. So indeveloping the plan it wasdecided to redirect theGeoRoute directly into thequarry, to make it safe andaccessible for visitors andenhance it with geologicalinformation panels! Theterm re-naturation wasredefined for the first timefor this project as"Geological re-naturation". In 2009 we received the wel-come news that the

    European Union and thestate of Rhineland-Palatinateapproved and agreed to fundhalf of this new project aspart of their structural sup-port programmes (LEADER /PAUL). The remaining finan-cial support was provided bythe municipality because ofthe regional importance ofthis site in their approach totourism. Construction began in late2010. The pit was leveled,the slopes secured with bigboulders of lava, and somegrass paved barrier-freeroutes were included in thedesign. In addition, a shorttrail displaying the volcanicrocks of the Eifel and an out-door classroom were devel-oped. Together they createthe unique Volcano ThemePark Mosenberg inBettenfeld, an exceptionalwindow into the Eifel volcan-ism! The outdoor

    classrom in theVolcanic ThemePark

    Volcanictheme parkMosenberg

    Martin [email protected]

    Vulkaneifel Geopark:Vulkaneifel Geopark:How did the VolcanicHow did the VolcanicTheme Park MosenbergTheme Park Mosenbergin Bettenfeld Originate?in Bettenfeld Originate?

    A view of theMosenberg

    Volcanic Grouplandscape near

    Bettenfeld

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    Maestrazgo Cultural Park,launched in 1998, includes43 municipalities in Teruel.There are 13,660 inhabitantson its mountainous 2,622km with 5 inhabitants/km,while the average for Spain is91/km. The territory isdefined geographically bythe Guadalope River Basinand geologically by itsimpressive landscape withfolded and faultedCretaceous outcrops. TheGeopark was established in2000, together with threeother European areas shar-ing a similar vision andfounding the EuropeanGeoparks Network. The con-cept Geopark defines aterritory which includes aparticular geological heritageand a sustainable territorialdevelopment strategy. TheGeopark also promoted theSpanish Forum of Geoparks,formally constituted in LaCaada de Verich inDecember, 2011.The Geopark has a rich andoutstanding heritage and40% of its territory belongsto Sites of CommunityImportance. Ten villageshave been designated asbeing of historical interest, ofthe 615 archaeological sitestwo are designated asUNESCO World HeritageSites and 48 areas with sitesof both geological andarchaeological sites/areas

    have been catalogued, andfour sites are designated asNatural Monuments. Sevendinosaur fossil sites and 20cultural sites are designatedindividually as Property ofCultural Interest and includ-ed as conservation sites ofprimary importance in theSpanish Heritage Laws.The Geoparks geology canbe enjoyed through free orguided visits to a variety ofsites: Dinpolis, a palaeon-tological park introducing theexciting world of dinosaursinside the Geopark; Galve(preparation process ofdinosaur fossils); Castellote(palaeobotany and palaeo-geography); and the exhibi-tion Water, Time and Landin Mas de las Matas - whichis managed by a Local ActionGroup. Other facilities arethe Geological and MiningParks in Aliaga and severalsignposted geological trails.Regular public events withinthe Geopark include travel-ling exhibitions, Geoloda,the Spanish Geology Day(founded in Aliaga), activitiescelebrating EuropeanGeoparks Week, fieldtripsduring the annual courses,scientific seminars and othereducational activities, arealso promoted. To dissemi-nate its geological heritageand to boost the GeoparksNetworking activities, it haslaunched the Geopark

    Corner, a weekly section inDiario de Teruel.Geology holds the keys tofascinating subjects whichgreatly affect our lives.Teruel Province is character-ized by actions such as theestablishment of a Geoparkleading to an emerging inter-est in geological tourism anda step forward in disseminat-ing the knowledge of geolo-gy to the public and inimproving the quality of lifeof the local communities.

    The Cretaceouslandscapeviewed from a site along a geo-trail near Aliaga

    One of the 120drawings fromthe childrenscontestWhats aGeopark toyou? celebrated duringEuropeanGeoparks Week2012 (drawingby A. Antn)

    Breathing geology for years in MaestrazgoGeopark

    Luis [email protected]

    ngel [email protected]

    Geoloda 11(2011), a national geological outreach initia-tive launched in 2005 in theMaestrazgoGeopark

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    The launching of theGeopark concept in 2000together with the furtherdevelopment of Geoparks asa new type of protected areaprovide an opportunity forintegrating methods whichare usually confined to spe-cific areas of managementand research in other typesof protected areas.Geoparkstherefore have an opportuni-ty to integrate their approachto the two fundamental com-ponents of nature: the biot-ic (biodiversity) and theabiotic (geodiversity) con-stituents. Such an approachleads to a better understand-ing of the links between thevarious factors within thesetwo parts of nature, thuscontributing to the efficacyof actions taken for reducingthreats and as a result lead-ing to more effective conser-vation. In Haeg CountryDinosaurs Geopark thisapproach starts in the ele-mentary and secondaryschools through the intro-duction of new programmesfor learning and understand-ing Nature around theschool. It continues withscientific research by stu-dents and professional

    researchers on the numerousand specific fossiliferousgeosites within this Geopark.The palaeontological studieshave the advantage of beingundertaken directly on siterevealing conclusive data onthe abiotic and biotic envi-ronments from the past andproviding clear and suitableexamples for their interpreta-tion. In order to sustain the inte-grated study of nature in theGeopark, a new ResearchCentre, fully equipped for theanalysis of biodiversity andgeodiversity, was inaugurat-ed two years ago. The stud-ies developed in the Centrehave a direct implication foragriculture and rural devel-opment in the region.

    An integrated approach tothe natural and cultural her-itage involving sites withthese respective attributeswhich alternate along someof the touristic trails, is alsopromoted in the HaegGeopark. On the Valley ofDinosaursTrail, for example,the points of interest forgeology (fossiliferous siteswith dinosaur remains andglacial moraines) occurtogether with cultural sites (a medieval church, anancient water mill and tradi-tional village houses). Thusvisitors have an opportunity toget a more holistic overviewof the values of the region.

    Haeg Dinosaurs Geopark, Romania

    Studentsdigging for dinosaurremains

    Dan [email protected]

    The newresearch

    centre in the Haeg

    DinosaursGeopark

    A place of integratedapproaches

    Looking at and listening to explanationsabout the geologi-cal history of theHaeg Geopark

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  • Climbing in the LuberonGeopark is known all over theworld thanks to the famouscliffs of Buoux, an interna-tionally famous climbing sitesince the early 1980's. Thefirst climbing film that springsto mind is "La vie au bout desdoigts" (Life at your finger-tips) was filmed by thefamous climber PatrickEdlinger in 1982.In May 2012, a sports associ-ation organized the secondinternational meeting onleisure climbing, Escala'Buoux, in partnership withthe Luberon Geopark andmany other private and pub-lic partners. In the outstand-ing Aiguebrun Valley domi-nated by 90 metre high cliffs,many activities were pro-posed: climbing discovery foryoung people, discussions,entertainment, exhibitionsand conferences.Sculpted by erosion, theimpressive marine limestoneformation is characterized byfossilized sand waves, bur-rows and shells. Five thou-sand years ago, humans set-

    tled in a wide cave locatednear the climbing site. Duringthe 9th century the cliffs wereoccupied by religious peopleand a castle was built in the11th century. Today, theancient castle is a destinationfor tourists and the river flow-ing in the valley is protectedbecause of its unique biodi-versity.The distinctive natural andcultural heritage led theorganizing team to connectsport with geology, the envi-ronment, archaeology andhistory. Participants discov-ered all aspects of this richsite through a trail equippedwith temporary interpretationpanels. These panels provid-ed concise information aboutancient seas and animals,sand deposits, traces ofhuman occupation (like holesin the cliff), the history ofclimbing activity in Buoux andanimals such as dragonfliesor crayfish. Guided tours withspecialists were provided,and a conference introduced20 million years of history:From Scallops to Climbers.The French OlympicCommittee recognized thisevent as AGENDA 21 becauseof its environmental responsi-bility (transport, waste man-agement and biodiversity), itssocial and economic impactsand its educational values.Escala'Buoux was an eventshowing how sport, geology,nature and culture can com-bine to produce social andlocal economic benefitsinvolving local people. It is aperfect example of sustain-able geotourism activity.

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    Sustainable development at your fingertips

    Entertainment: poetry and dance on the cliff by Antoine le Menestrel

    Going down by ancient steps

    cut in the rock

    Stphane [email protected]

    Luberon Geopark, SE France

    Geology, archaeology, history and sport on the Aiguebrun cliffs

    s

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    Today, the moor hosts 11 pro-tected species as well as iceage relics. Animal breedingactivity helps maintain andpreserve this unique habitat.Scientific pollen analyseshave revealed the moors5000-year history includingthe evolution of vegetation,climate and human societies. The Massif des BaugesGeopark developed, in part-nership with the FrenchMinistry of Education andlocal guides, an educationalgame based on the natural,historical and geological her-itage of the moor aimed atjunior high school students.During the game studentsassume the role of an electedofficer, a farmer, a business-man entrepreneur, or a scien-tist to discuss fictional devel-opment plans such as thecreation of an adventurewalk. This educational activi-ty, a logical contribution tosustainable development,resulted in the Geopark win-ning the Natura 2000 Prize in2010.In 2012 the Massif desBauges Geopark developed ageotrail to raise public aware-

    ness of its geological her-itage. Panels provide visitorswith information about themoors origin, biodiversityand exploitation by Man. But why limit the site to thou-sands of years of geologicalhistory? In 2010, a localgroup suggested developingan astronomical observatoryto enhance the Creusatessite. It opened its doors in2012 thanks to the supportreceived from the EuropeanLEADER programme. Themain target groups for thisproject are schoolchildrenand tourists who can observethe NGC 2158, an open starcluster in the constellation ofGemini, which is some 1.5 bil-lion years old. It shows us a12,000-year-old image creat-ed during the formation ofthe moor. Discovering thesecrets of the Universe offersanother perspective of ourplanet. Visitors are exposedto another dimension, provid-ing them with a better under-standing of the Earths evolu-tion and the challenges facedby Man as a result of thisongoing change. Visiting the Creusates site

    across different eras helpsvisitors to get a sense of theevolution of our region andthe influence and involve-ment of people who havelived in it. The history of theEarth, the conservation ofnatural resources, climatechange, the workings andevolution of our society are alldealt with on the Creusatesgeosite, with its great geolog-ical heritage, preserved envi-ronment and lively activities,all of which enables us to facethe future!

    Massif des Bauges Geopark, France

    Exploring the Time on Creusates geosite(Saint-Franois de Sales)

    The astronomicalobservatory atthe Creusatesgeosite

    A view of themoor andCreusatesgeosite

    Junior highschool students

    participate inan educational

    game

    Jean-Luc [email protected]

    Andr Guerraz

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  • This article describes three ofthe most important geologicalsites that contribute to theuniqueness of the TuscanMining Park.

    Rocce di Poggio alCarpino e Canaloni(Roccastrada) This geosite provides infor-mation concerning the geo-logical evolution of Italy'snorthern Apennine range.Here, approximately 250 mil-lion years ago, marine andterrestrial rocks were formedduring the genesis of theancient Tethys Ocean whichled to the separation of twoancient continents namedLaurasia (the Euro-Asiaticregion) and Gondwana (theA f r o - A u s t r o - A m e r i c a nregion). The closure of theTethys resulted in the com-pression, metamorphism,fracturing and uplifting of therocks to form the Alpine andApennine mountain chains.Today these metamorphicrocks occur in the valleys ofthe Torrente Farma (RiverFarma) at Canaloni, wherewater erosion follows thelines of major approximatelythree million year old faults.

    Le Biancane(MonterotondoMarittimo)The Valle del Diavolo (DevilsValley) geosite, better knownas Biancane, is character-ized by geothermal fluidscontained in the at least 150million year old evaporate-carbonate-siliceous rocks.The Biancane extends over aSW-NE oriented area ofaround 0.8 km which followsthe direction of the main localrock fracture system in theApennine chain. These frac-tures allow high temperature(c. 150 C), acidic hydrother-mal fluids to rise to the sur-face, resulting in whitening ofthe rock. Formations of nativesulphur and hot mud poolsfrequently occur togetherwith gas emissions. Thehydrothermal processes haveinfluenced the flora whichadds to the unique charm ofthis geosite.

    Le Roste (Montieri) Between the late 19th andearly 20th centuries, a uniquetechnique was used to extractcopper from ore derived from

    the nearby Merse chalcopy-rite mine using a method,known by experts as the"Conedera method". Thisinvolved crushing and smelt-ing of the ore followed byleaching and gravity settlingof the pure copper. The dis-tinctive Le Roste badlandlandscape resulted from theerosion by rain and surfacerun-off of red coloured miner-al rich spoil heaps, theremains of the copper extrac-tion process.

    Three very specialGeosites in the Tuscan Mining Geopark

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    Alessandra [email protected]

    gavorrano.gr.itRiccardo Cinelli

    [email protected]

    The distinctiveLe Roste badland landscape

    Hydrothermalemissions at theValle del Diavolo

    (Devils Valley)geosite

    Metamorphicrocks exposedin the bed of the FarmaRiver

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    Hidden behind steep moun-tains, lies Zagori, a smallearthly paradise containing46 villages, which thrivedespecially during the late18th and early 19th centurieswhen commerce was at itspeak. Deep gorges and tor-rential rivers separate Zagorifrom the picturesque town ofKonitsa and its 45 villageslocated on magnificentforested mountains at thenorthwestern point ofGreece.Due to the mountainousnature of the region, theconstruction of bridges wasimperative since it facilitatedthe free movement of theinhabitants from place toplace. This involved shorttrips associated with impor-tant livestock-rearing activi-ties to much longer journeysundertaken by organizedguilds within and beyond theboundaries of Greece. Manybridges are still in-place, 40in Zagori and 25 in Konitsa.Half of these bridges arelocated within the Geopark. The period of bridge con-

    struction occurred in the 18th-19th centuries when Greecewas part of the OttomanEmpire. The decision to con-struct a bridge was takeneither by an individual, suchas a wealthy citizen or anabbot of some nearbymonastery or by a villagecommunity. The costs ofconstruction which wereextremely high, were theresponsibility of the personor the persons who spon-sored the project. In recogni-tion of such a service to thecommunity, the bridge wouldfrequently bear the name ofits patron. The bridges were construct-ed from blocks of limestoneand sandstone which arecommon rocks in the region.The cementing agent wascomposed of a mixture ofcrumbled tiles, lime, pumice-stone, water, dried herbs,goats hair and even eggwhites were used to providea greater binding effect.The bridges display differentstyles of architecture involv-ing the number and

    shape of the arches. Thearches are either semi-circu-lar in shape or slightly point-ed and reminiscent ofGothic or Islamic architec-ture. Sometimes the crafts-men would paint in somesmall corner the likeness of asaint who would become thebridges guardian.

    Vikos - Aoos GeoparkVikos - Aoos Geopark

    Bridges that connectroutes and cultures

    Georgia Kitsaki [email protected]

    HaritakisPapaioannou [email protected]

    Panagiotis Paschos [email protected]

    Noutsos bridgein the Zagoriarea built in 1770

    The Kalogerikobridge in the

    Zagori areabuilt in 1850

    The Konitsastone bridge

    over the RiverAoosbuilt in

    1870

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  • The European Geoparks The European Geoparks

    The Network consists of 52 Geoparks in 18 European The Network consists of 52 Geoparks in 18 European c

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  • s Network today...s Network today...

    an countries (April 2013)an countries (April 2013)

    1. Reserve Geologique de Haute - Provence FRANCE

    2. Vulkaneifel European Geopark GERMANY

    3. Petrified Forest of Lesvos GREECE

    4. Maestrazgo Cultural Park ARAGON, SPAIN

    5. Psiloritis Natural Park GREECE

    6. Terra.Vita Naturpark GERMANY

    7. Copper Coast Geopark IRELAND

    8. Marble Arch Caves European Geopark NORTHERN IRELAND & IRELAND

    9. Madonie Geopark ITALY

    10. Rocca di Cerere Geopark ITALY

    11. Naturpark Steirische Eisenwurzen AUSTRIA

    12. Geo-Naturpark Bergstrasse Odenwald GERMANY

    13. North Pennines AONB ENGLAND, UK

    14. Park Naturel Regional du Luberon FRANCE

    15. North West Highlands SCOTLAND, UK

    16. Geopark Swabian Albs GERMANY

    17. Geopark Harz Braunschweiger Land Ostfalen GERMANY

    18. Hateg Country Dinosaurs Geopark ROMANIA

    19. Beigua Geopark ITALY

    20. Fforest Fawr Geopark WALES, UK

    21. Bohemian Paradise Geopark CZECH REPUBLIC

    22. Cabo de Gata - Nijar Natural Park ANDALUCIA, SPAIN

    23. Geopark Naturtejo da Meseta Meridional PORTUGAL

    24. Sierras Subbeticas Natural Park ANDALUCIA, SPAIN

    25. Sobrarbe Geopark ARAGON, SPAIN

    26. Gea Norvegica Geopark NORWAY

    27. Geological, Mining Park of Sardenia ITALY

    28. Papuk Geopark CROATIA

    29. English Riviera Geopark ENGLAND, UK

    30. Adamello - Brenta Nature Park ITALY

    31. Geo Mon WALES, UK

    32. Arouca Geopark PORTUGAL

    33. Shetlands SCOTLAND - UK

    34. Chelmos Vouraikos GREECE

    35. Novohrad - Nograd Geopark HUNGARY & SLOVAKIA

    36. Magma Geopark NORWAY

    37. Basque Coast Geopark, Pais Vasco SPAIN

    38. Parco Nazionale del Cilento e Vallo di Diano, Campania ITALY

    39. Rokua Geopark FINLAND

    40. Tuscan Mining Park, Toscana ITALY

    41. Vikos - Aoos Geopark GREECE

    42. Muskau Arch Geopark POLAND & GERMANY

    43. Sierra Norte de Sevilla Natural Park, Andalucia SPAIN

    44. Burren and Cliffs of Moher REPUBLIC OF IRELAND

    45. Katla ICELAND

    46. Massif des Bauges Geopark FRANCE

    47. Apuan Alps ITALY

    48. Villuercas Ibores Jara Geopark SPAIN

    49. Carnic Alps Geopark AUSTRIA

    50. Chablais Geopark FRANCE

    51. Central Catalonia Geopark SPAIN

    52. Bakony Balaton Geopark HUNGARY

    www.europeangeoparks.orgwww.europeangeoparks.org

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    A Geopark offers a large vari-ety of possibilities thatenable the visitor to enjoynature and to learn aboutthe geological features of aregion and their relationshipto every-day life and humanculture. Fascinating landscapes andgeosites are interpreted bothin the field and through digi-tal and printed information.Besides, local tourism enter-prises can be used as one ofthe most powerful tools forpromoting geological her-itage to the Geoparks visi-tors. The valuable heritage ofthe European Geoparks canbe evidenced and dissemi-nated through the develop-ment of geologically relatedmerchandising products.Examples include souvenirsor handicrafts in the shape offossils or containing imagesof fossils and geologicalmenus in restaurants. Otherinitiatives for raising andincreasing the visibility of thegeological heritage and theGeoparks profile include cre-ating information points,incorporating geological andGeopark motifs in the dcorof shops, restaurants,tourism providers and busi-nesses.

    In order to promote the geo-logical heritage throughenterprises, the GeoparkSierras Subbticas has devel-oped the following strategy:

    Commissioning a geolo-gist with a specializedknowledge in design.Enterprises are advised bothtechnically and aesthetically.The Geopark supervisesthese initiatives, guaranteesaccurate and up-to-dateinformation and providesthem with scientificallybased designs with textscontaining geological infor-mation expressed in wordsthat are understandable tomembers of the general pub-lic.

    Use of enterprises forummeetings.Twenty five enterprises inSubbticas Geopark adhereto the European Charter forSustainable Tourism. TheGeoparks managementencourages the forum creat-ed by entrepreneurs stronglycommitted to environmentalpractices and invites newenterprises to attend thesemeetings. By delivering talksabout the Geopark, on theimportance of conservingand promoting the geologicalheritage and on the benefitsof participating in this forum,enterprises are encouragedto create Geopark productsand to promote the geologi-cal heritage.Following the success of sev-eral meetings in SubbticasGeopark, the number ofenterprises participating inthe promoting the geologicalheritage is increasing rapidly.Their involvement con-

    tributes to disseminating thegeological values of the terri-tory, to raising the visibility ofthe European GeoparksNetwork and to strengthen-ing the local identity of aregion through its naturalheritage.

    TheApartamentosRurales LosCastillarejos(Luque) havebuilt a very geologicalswimming poolThe TethysSea and provide informationabout the precursor of theMediterranean

    The guesthousePensinGuerrero(Cabra) is decoratedwith Geoparkmotifs, offersinformation of the geologicalheritage andsells Geoparkproducts

    Handicraftsinspired by the

    ammonites of Sierras

    SubbticasGeopark: the glass

    lamp screen of Vidriomundo

    (Cabra); the wooden

    puzzle ofArteamano (Priego

    de Crdoba)

    Baldomero Moreno Arroyo [email protected]

    juntadeandalucia.esAlicia Serna Barquero

    [email protected]

    Sierra Subbetica Natural Park:The role of the Geopark enterprises in the promotion of the geological heritage

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    Could there be a bettersource for drinking water fora big city than the unspoiledarea of a geopark? Theannual 142 million m3 waterdemand for the city ofVienna is supplied, almostcompletely, from Alpinekarst springs. Fifty threepercent, 75,4 million m3 ofthis total water supplycomes from the EisenwurzenNature and Geopark, some200 km away from Vienna.The springs are located inthe valley of the River Salzaat the foot of the almostuninhabited Hochschwabmountain massif which risesup to 2277 m in height. Highprecipitation rates at lowtemperatures and the accu-mulation of several metersof snow during cold wintersare the source of thesprings.The Klaeffer Spring, themost important of six

    springs, is the largest karsticspring exploited for drinkingwater in Europe. Its averagedischarge amounts to54,000 m3 a day but vol-umes up to 860,000 m3 perday have been measuredafter heavy rainfall andespecially during the snowmelt. Only a fraction of theoutflow is used, the majorityis released into the Salzariver. The spring is especial-ly impressive during thesnow melt. There is such anabundance of water that it isdischarged from outlets upto 70 m above the valleyfloor. The area around the com-munity of Wildalpen is notonly an important source ofwater for the Austrian capi-tal but it also attracts many

    visitors. The visit to theKlaeffer Spring which can beapproached through a 60 mlong tunnel is an absolutehighlight. The museum ofthe Vienna Water Works isalso a major attraction. Itprovides an excellent insightinto the geology and hydrol-ogy of the area, the historyof the water main which wasopened in 1910 and its tech-nical background. The RiverSalza is a major destinationfor whitewater canoeists andrafters from all over Europeand, as in other locations inthe Eisenwurzen, there arewell-marked hiking trailswithin the area of the rivervalley.

    River Salza is a an eldoradofor rafters fromall over Europe

    The KlaefferSpring during

    snow melt:Water pours

    down from all sides

    Heinz Kollmann Irmi Auer

    [email protected]

    The best of Eisenwurzen:The best of Eisenwurzen:

    Water for the Austrian capital

    The water drop gallery

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    The Brecon Beacons NationalPark Authority (BBNPA)launched and delivered theUKs first National ParkAmbassador Scheme inJanuary 2010. The schemewhich aims to support andassist tourism businesses inproviding outstanding serviceto visitors, was initially deliv-ered as part of COLLABOR8 a programme funded byINTERREG IVB North WestEurope from 2008 to 2012and has since continued withsupport from Rural Alliences.It involves a series of freeworkshops designed to pro-vide training and informationto local tourism businessesthat will enable them toengage with and inspire visi-tors to explore the BreconBeacons National Park.Participants attend three

    one-day courses deliveredover a year to achieve theirNational Park AmbassadorAward. The scheme, consist-ing of three core courseswhich are based on Sense ofPlace, Park in your Heartand Customer Care, alsoincludes a geology module.By extending the geologymodule, the training pro-gramme also offers a FforestFawr Geopark AmbassadorsScheme. This scheme, fund-ed by the BBNPA is open tolocal businesses that havealready completed theNational Park Ambassadorsscheme. The new trainingprogramme includes twoone-day workshops over ayear and, on completion,local business people will beawarded a certificate andprovided with promotional

    material. The GeoparkAmbassadors Scheme focus-es on the Geopark concept,the nature of Geoparks, therequirements of the chartersof the European and GlobalGeoparks Networks and therigorous evaluation andrevalidation procedureswhich ensure that theGeopark designation standsfor quality. Participants experience howGeoparks raise public aware-ness of the discoveries in thegeosciences which led to ourunderstanding of the dynam-ic processes responsible forcreating the Earths structure,rocks and minerals and sur-face landforms. Presentationsand field excursions provideinsights into the Geoparkssuperb geology and land-scapes, the links between itsgeological, industrial, tangi-ble and intangible heritageand the need to conservethese for future generations. The Geopark AmbassadorsScheme emphasizes FforestFawr Geoparks role in collab-orating with local businessesand residents to contribute tosustainable wealth creationby protecting and promotingits landscape for the develop-ment of geotourism.

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    Tony RamsayAlan Bowring

    [email protected]

    The foldedCarboniferousLimestone at Bwa Maen a popular destination for walkers and geologists

    Remains ofPenwyllt

    Brickworks whichproduced

    refractory bricksfor use in theSouth Wales

    metal industry

    Fforest Fawr Geopark Ambassadors:

    Ambassadors for Geo-conservation

    One of the fieldexcursion

    for Fforest FawrGeoparks

    Ambassadorsexploring

    the Geoparksindustrial landscape

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    Thematic routes, such as thegastronomical, architectonicor famous writers tours, aretourism products which makeuse of natural or manmadeattractions. In recent yearsthe number of thematicroutes all over the world hasincreased following a trendinvolving stronger networkingand cooperation betweenorganizations and/or regions.With the advent of Geoparksin Portugal there is anincreasing demand for geo-tourism attractions that caneither be fulfilled by utilizingthe existing offers or bydeveloping relatively unex-ploited tourism resources. Athematic route linking geo-tourism attractions provides a

    means for diversifying andimproving the quality of theroute through a relativelysmall investment. Increasingthe size and quality of thetourism provision has thepotential to ensure that holi-day makers in geoparksextend the duration of theirvisits and minimizes theeffects of seasonality. Theabundance and diversity offossils, and particularly oftrilobites, in the Ordovicianrocks of Portugal, combinedwith the already availableinterpretive facilities, maketrilobites a logical subject fora thematic geotour. Under theagreement between Natur-tejo Global Geopark, theFaculty of Science of theUniversity of Porto and theGeological InterpretationCentre of Canelas at AroucaGeopark, the projectTrilobites Route is beingdeveloped. This project joinsthe three areas in Portugalwhere trilobites can beenjoyed on-site.The Valongo Palaeozoic Park(a partnership between theFaculty of Science of theUniversity of Porto andMunicipality of Valongo)opened in 1998 as a pioneergeoconservation project. Inaddition to its diverse geolog-ical heritage, the internation-ally known Ordovician trilo-bites of Valongo are of parti-cularly interest. An interpreta-tive circuit is available to visi-tors, which follows theOrdovician sequence in ajourney through time fromthe opening of the RheicOcean, to the UpperOrdovician Ice Age which

    almost led to the extinction ofthese marine invertebrates.The unique GeologicalInterpretation Centre ofCanelas, also known as theMuseum of Trilobites,enables visitors to discoverthe giant trilobites that livedin the Ordovician sea. Thecentre which developed as aprivate family project, involv-ing two decades of carefulfossil collecting and conserva-tion, has been open to thepublic since 2006. One of themain attractions of NaturtejoGeopark, the IchnologicalPark of Penha Garcia intro-duces the visitor to themodes of life of the long-extinct trilobites. Situated inoutstanding scenery, verticalquartzite beds reveal fossilbehaviour within a giganticnatural art gallery. TheIchnological Park successfullyintegrates the classicCruziana trace fossils withlocal rural life and culture.

    The Trilobites Tour in Portugal

    The ecologicaltrail at ValongoPalaeozoic Park

    Carlos Neto de Carvalho [email protected]

    Helena Couto [email protected] Valrio

    [email protected]

    Guided visitsto the

    GeologicalInterpretation

    Centre of Canelas

    Developing the first geotourism itinerary

    dedicated to palaeobiodiversity

    The opening of theIchnological Park of Penha Garcia by the Pr