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Determined by opportunity not ability? Pat Morton, Jill Collins, Claire Nix

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Text of Determined by opportunity not ability? Pat Morton, Jill Collins, Claire Nix

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  • Determined by opportunity not ability? Pat Morton, Jill Collins, Claire Nix
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  • Starting Points 42% of firms struggle to find the STEM talent they require 64% of firms are taking some action to encourage young people to pursue STEM subjects. only around 20% of those taking A-Level Physics or studying undergraduate physics courses is female and 50% of state schools have no women studying A level Physics. 18% entered for Triple Science with large regional differences in participation (11%-28%). 39% of pupils did not achieve A-C in GCSE Maths. Dyson report 4% of young women want to be engineers, 14% scientists and 32% models.
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  • The STEM careers rap.. http://www.nationalstemcentre.org.uk/elibrar y/resource/5971/what-do-you-want-to-do http://www.nationalstemcentre.org.uk/elibrar y/resource/5971/what-do-you-want-to-do
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  • Pass it on http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G7l6crlM Orw&feature=youtu.be http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G7l6crlM Orw&feature=youtu.be
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  • An Introduction to Career Learning and Development 11-19 Career learning is not acquired simply through information and advice. Career learning is constructed through activity and in interaction with a variety of people (careers professional, employers, teachers, parents, peers). Individuals need ongoing experiences and discussion in order to construct this knowledge within a changing social and cultural context.
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  • 8 Continuation of interests and hobbies from childhood Childhood role models still important e.g. parents, teachers, other authority figures Status and self esteem driven by being clever or good at things Need to inspire interest Key Stage 3 Balancing here and now perspective with greater thoughts about future learning to defer gratification Starting to feel more adult pressures and responsibilities Identity being focussed on associations/clubs/belonging Planning and action Post-16 Support through the key stages Move out of childhood and into teen realm Aware and responsive to peer group influence Retreating into more private realm away from influence or easy access of adults Status and self esteem defined by popularity and peer acceptance Bring possibilities to life, planning Key Stage 4 The nature and type, the timing and the extent to which they are tailored to meet needs influences the strength of the impact.
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  • Case Studies Dorcan Academy Swindon Leeanne Hunnex raised profile of STEM, ran assemblies, created notice boards and wrote a whole school action plan St Katherine - Will Pearson setting up a resource bank, working with ambassadors, planning events to ensure impact on students, linking the curriculum to STEM contexts Pats two?
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  • Key Principles check these with Pat/Jill Planned and progressive Starts early (Evidence suggests that most young peoples Science aspirations and views of Science are formed during primary schools and solidified by 14) Age appropriate Broadens horizons Planned and delivered with colleagues in school Drawing on external partners
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  • http://www.stem-e-and-d-toolkit.co.uk/
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  • Some Key Resources Tomorrows Engineers Bank

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