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EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 1-1 University of Alaska Fairbanks CAMPUS MASTER PLAN 1. Executive Summary INTRODUCTION The campus master plan is designed to guide and shape the physical environment of the University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF) main campus and to present a model for planning throughout UAF’s branch campuses and remote facilities. It is the culmination of a year of participatory planning involving members of the university and larger Fairbanks communities. The master plan will guide campus growth and change and govern all future decisions related to the physical environment of the Fairbanks campus. The master plan is an integral part of broader planning efforts at UAF that include the university’s academic plan, strategic plan and accreditation self-study. The master plan strength- ens UAF’s distinctive role as the nation’s northernmost Land, Sea and Space Grant university and international research center. It furthers the university’s mission to advance and dissemi- nate knowledge through creative teaching, research and public service with an emphasis on Alaska, the North and their diverse peoples. The master plan represents an important shift toward comprehensive, long-term planning for the campus. Past decisions were often made in response to opportunity or convenience, without recognizing the effects of these individual moves on the total campus environment. The result is a campus that lacks order. The university’s previous campus master plan, completed in 1991, offered a vision for the campus but gave no specific recommendations for change. The charge of the current master plan is to establish a vision for the campus that is practical, achievable and tied to a clear implementation schedule. The master plan builds on UAF’s unique location in the far North and the special challenges and opportunities that this presents. The Fairbanks campus consists of nearly 2,250 acres of boreal forest, hillsides, lakes and fields. It has a distinctive cultural history as Troth Yeddha’, an Athabascan Indian meeting place. Today, people of Interior Alaska look to UAF as a cornerstone of community life in a myriad of ways: intellectual challenges, athletics, fine arts, public service, research and economic development. UAF shares with the Fairbanks commu- nity a distinctive Alaskan spirit of independence and self-reliance. That spirit opens doors for Aerial view of the campus - looking east

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  • EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 1-1University of Alaska Fairbanks CAMPUS MASTER PLAN

    1. Executive Summary

    INTRODUCTION

    The campus master plan is designed to guide and shape the physical environment of theUniversity of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF) main campus and to present a model for planningthroughout UAF's branch campuses and remote facilities. It is the culmination of a year ofparticipatory planning involving members of the university and larger Fairbanks communities.The master plan will guide campus growth and change and govern all future decisions relatedto the physical environment of the Fairbanks campus.

    The master plan is an integral part of broader planning efforts at UAF that include theuniversity's academic plan, strategic plan and accreditation self-study. The master plan strength-ens UAF's distinctive role as the nation's northernmost Land, Sea and Space Grant universityand international research center. It furthers the university's mission to advance and dissemi-nate knowledge through creative teaching, research and public service with an emphasis onAlaska, the North and their diverse peoples.

    The master plan represents an important shift toward comprehensive, long-term planning forthe campus. Past decisions were often made in response to opportunity or convenience,without recognizing the effects of these individual moves on the total campus environment.The result is a campus that lacks order. The university's previous campus master plan,completed in 1991, offered a vision for the campus but gave no specific recommendations forchange. The charge of the current master plan is to establish a vision for the campus that ispractical, achievable and tied to a clear implementation schedule.

    The master plan builds on UAF's unique location in the far North and the special challengesand opportunities that this presents. The Fairbanks campus consists of nearly 2,250 acres ofboreal forest, hillsides, lakes and fields. It has a distinctive cultural history as Troth Yeddha',an Athabascan Indian meeting place. Today, people of Interior Alaska look to UAF as acornerstone of community life in a myriad of ways: intellectual challenges, athletics, fine arts,public service, research and economic development. UAF shares with the Fairbanks commu-nity a distinctive Alaskan spirit of independence and self-reliance. That spirit opens doors for

    Aerial view of the campus - looking east

  • 1-2 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY University of Alaska Fairbanks CAMPUS MASTER PLAN

    innovation and opportunity in all aspects of the university's work. This plan builds on thatspirit and the university's distinctive geographic location in fulfilling its mission in the areas ofteaching, research and public service.

    VISION

    The campus master plan strives to create a collegial environment that supports the institu-tional mission of UAF. It envisions an attractive and well-ordered campus that takes advan-tage of its unique northern location and the extraordinary resources of its natural and commu-nity setting. The plan creates an order for the campus to be reflected in all its interrelatedparts: the continuity of its landscape and architecture, the streamlining of vehicle circulationand parking, the enhancement of the campus' natural environment, and the concentration ofdevelopment in core areas linked by transit and pedestrian paths to create a more integratedand efficient campus.

    PURPOSE

    The master plan is a guide for logical growth and change. It is a living document that resultsfrom a dynamic process of addressing both existing and anticipated conditions, desires, pro-grams and space demands. It will be used by the Chancellors Cabinet, the Master PlanningCommittee and others in developing and evaluating capital funding requests, designing andconstructing new facilities and enhancing the built and natural campus environments.

    The intent is to gather and reassess data regularly and to refine design criteria to accommo-date change, provide permanence, and allow the university to evolve with grace. It is antici-pated that the UAF Master Planning Committee will review the plan at least annually, updateswill be made every five years, and a full review of the master plan will be required in 10years. Future decisions can, of course, vary from the direction of this plan. However, theyshould be made carefully so that the implications of variance can be fully understood regard-ing the vision that this master plan represents.

  • EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 1-3University of Alaska Fairbanks CAMPUS MASTER PLAN

    Legend:

    Academic

    Research

    Administrative

    Student Services

    Residential

    Recreation and Athletics

    Support

    Ancillary

    Statewide Administration

    U. S. ForestResearch

    Honors HouseCampus Ministry

    Frat.Hs.

    BorealArboretum

    PotatoField

    Thom

    pson

    Dri

    ve

    Tanana Loop

    Future Tanana Loop Completion(Approximate alignment)

    Improved Intersection

    Future Building Sites*

    Reserve Lands

    Transportation Hub

    Proposed Road

    Shuttle Bus Route

    Unimproved Trail

    Lighted Trail

    Recreational Trail

    Pedestrian Circulation

    IntlArctic

    Rsrch

    Elvey

    ONeill

    IrvingGH

    ArcticHealth

    IABButrovich

    Agriculture & ForestryExperiment Station

    Georgeson Botanical Garden

    NaturalSciences

    Cutler Apartment Complex

    StudentRecreation

    Center

    Ice ArenaPatty Center

    Harper

    LolaTilly

    Commons

    Lathrop Nerland

    Steven

    s McIntosh

    Chapman

    Copper Lane

    ChancellorsResidence

    WoodCenter

    Constit

    ution

    shamWicker

    FineArts

    Great Hall

    RasmusonLibrary

    Gruening

    Eiel

    son

    Signe

    rs

    Bunnell

    Brooks

    Duckering

    West ValleyHigh School

    HutchisonCareer Center

    UniversityPark

    PhysicalPlantPower

    Plant

    Hlth.Safe

    Wals

    h

    Fire

    Harw

    ood

    Moore-Bartlett-Skarland

    Stua

    rt

    GardenApts.

    ColumbiaCircle

    HessVIllage

    North

    Tana

    na

    Yukon Drive

    Tanana LoopTanana Loop

    Alumni Drive

    West Tanana

    Farm

    ers

    Lo

    op

    Ro

    adU

    niv

    ersi

    ty A

    ve.

    Geist Road

    Koyukuk Drive

    N. Chandalar

    S. C

    hand

    alar

    Denali Lane

    Ambler Lane

    Fair

    ban

    ks S

    tree

    t

    Taku D

    rive

    Alaska Railroad

    Tanana Loop

    College

    Road

    EarlyChild.Lab

    USF

    Nordic Hs.

    North Campus

    Fairbanks Experimental Farm Fields

    Tanana Loop

    Tanana LoopTanana Loop

    IntlArctic

    Rsrch

    ElveyIrving

    GHSkiHut

    ArcticHealth

    Museum

    ButrovichAgriculture & Forestry

    Experiment Station

    NaturalSciences

    Cutler Apartment Complex

    StudentRecreation

    Center

    Ice ArenaPatty Center

    Harper

    LolaTilly

    Commons

    Lathrop Nerland

    Steven

    s McIntosh

    Chapman

    Copper Lane

    ChancellorsResidence

    WoodCenter

    shamWicker

    FineArts

    Great Hall

    RasmusonLibrary

    Gruening

    Eiel

    son

    Bunnell

    Brooks

    Duckering

    West ValleyHigh School

    HutchisonCareer Center

    UniversityPark

    PhysicalPlantPower

    Plant

    Hlth.Safe

    Wals

    h

    Fire

    Harw

    ood

    Stua

    rt

    GardenApts.

    ColumbiaCircle

    MacLeanHouse

    HessVIllage

    N. Chandalar

    Chatanika

    S. C

    hand

    alar

    Denali Lane

    Ambler Lane

    Shee

    nje

    k D

    rive

    Alaska Railroad

    Parks Highw

    ay

    EarlyChild.Lab

    USF

    Nordic Hs.

    RaineysCabin

    Ku

    sko

    kwim

    Way

    61 2

    34

    5

    7

    89

    10

    11

    1213

    14

    15

    16

    17

    18

    19

    20

    21

    * described in Section 8

    Legend:

    Potential Campus-RelatedDevelopment

    1-21

    Potential High DensityResidential Area

    Recreation Area

    Open Spaces

    New Parking

    Support Services

    WRT Wallace Roberts & ToddBezek Durst Seiser

    200 600 1000 2000 1/2 Mile 1 MileN

    The Future Campus2002

    An 11 X 17 version of The Future Campus map is included as an insert at the back of this document.

  • 1-4 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY University of Alaska Fairbanks CAMPUS MASTER PLAN

    GOALS

    The goals of the campus master plan are designed to achieve the vision of a well-ordered andattractive campus. The success of one goal may depend upon the success of others. Thesegoals are:

    I. Create an efficient and attractive campus environment conducive to learning

    II. Improve community access to the UAF campus

    III. Make vehicle circulation and parking simple and direct

    IV. Promote safe and efficient travel throughout campus for pedestrians andnon-motorized uses

    V. Highlight natural assets of campus and the unique northern environment

    ACTIONS

    A set of actions was developed that best achieves the goals for the campus. Since the goalsare interrelated, one action can address several goals at once. Furthermore, these actions willhave a much greater impact if they occur concurrently rather than individually. As an ex-ample, completing Tanana Loop is an important action, but it alone cannot make the campusmore accessible to the community or improve the pedestrian environment. Other comple-mentary actionsproviding convenient parking on the perimeter of campus and improvingshuttle service, walkways and signageneed to be undertaken at the same time if the visionof the master plan is to be achieved.

    The following matrix states the specific actions of the master plan and identifies the goals towhich each contributes. The actions are described in detail in Section 8 of the report, andspecific implementation steps and phasing are detailed in Section 9.

  • EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 1-5University of Alaska Fairbanks CAMPUS MASTER PLAN

    GOALS

    I. Create an efficient and attractive campus environment conducive to learning

    II. Improve community access to the UAF campus

    III. Make vehicle circulation and parking simple and direct

    IV. Promote safe and efficient travel throughout campus for pedestrians and non-motorized uses

    V. Highlight natural assets of campus and the unique northern environment

    ACTIONSA1. Concentrate future building sites within the perimeter of Tanana Loop, increasing the density of existing core areas.

    A2. Consolidate related programs in designated buildings to improve program identity and access.

    A3. Design new and retrofitted buildings to contribute to the campus environment, using energy conservation techniques suited to the subarctic climate.

    A4. Develop a landscape plan and site design standards that will provide year-round plant diversity and enhance the overall appearance of campus.

    A5. Require landscaping and site enhancements as part of all new construction projects.

    A6. Enhance existing and create new, outdoor gathering areas and plazas.

    A7. Provide lighting throughout campus that maximizes safety, enhances wayfinding and minimizes light pollution.

    A8. Improve and expand housing opportunities for students and faculty.

    A9. Identify and evaluate sites on campus land outside the Tanana Loop perimeter for special function buildings such as a research and development park, public safety, parking, community service and other support functions.

    A10. Build parking garages on campus at designated sites.

    A11. Provide a quick and efficient year-round shuttle bus system throughout campus.

    A12. Complete Tanana Loop.

    A13. Increase parking along the perimeter of campus and subsequently reduce parking in the interior.

    A14. Designate accessible, short-term parking for commuter students, community members and visitors.

    A15. Provide direction and information signs throughout campus that are clear and consistent in theme, location and design.

    A16. Present a unified image in campus roadway and entrance design.

    A17. Ensure that roadway and intersection designs emphasize safety and efficiency.

    A18. Create safe and attractive corridors close to all campus roadways for non-motorized uses.

    A19. Develop Yukon Drive into a safe and appealing environment for pedestrians and non-motorized uses.

    A20. Establish direct connections to the UAF trail system from points throughout campus.

    A21. Make all walkways on campus safe and direct.

    A22. In selected areas, protect scenic views and/or establish stands of trees.

    A23. Preserve the agricultural function and character of the Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station lands.

    A24. Protect the integrity of the North Campus area for education, research and recreation, including maintaining and promoting the UAF trail system as a significant campus and community asset.

    A25. Use art on campus to highlight special areas and enhance the overall surroundings.

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