Writing I Basics, Nouns and Articles. essays ↙↓↘↙↓↘↙↓↘↙↓↘paragraphs ↙↓↘↙↓↘↙↓↘↙↓↘sentences ↙↓↘↙↓↘↙↓↘↙↓↘phrases ↙↓↘↙↓↘↙↓↘↙↓↘words.

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<ul><li> Slide 1 </li> <li> Writing I Basics, Nouns and Articles </li> <li> Slide 2 </li> <li> essays paragraphs sentences phrases words </li> <li> Slide 3 </li> <li> Parts of Speech Nouns Nouns Pronouns Pronouns Verbs Verbs Adjectives Adjectives Adverbs Adverbs Prepositions Prepositions Conjunctions Conjunctions Articles Articles Injections Injections </li> <li> Slide 4 </li> <li> Basic Elements of a Sentence Subject Subject Verb Verb Examples: Examples: You sing. You sing. I dance. I dance. </li> <li> Slide 5 </li> <li> What can be a subject? Nouns Nouns Noun phrases Noun phrases Noun clauses Noun clauses Infinitive phrases Infinitive phrases Gerunds Gerunds </li> <li> Slide 6 </li> <li> What is a clause? A smaller sentence inside another sentence A smaller sentence inside another sentence Example: Example: I know he is happy. I know he is happy. a clause a clause a noun clause a noun clause </li> <li> Slide 7 </li> <li> Types of Nouns Count Nouns Count Nouns Singular count nouns always come with an article. Singular count nouns always come with an article. Plural count nouns always come with an s or es at the end. Plural count nouns always come with an s or es at the end. Noncount Nouns Noncount Nouns Noncount Nouns are always singular. Noncount Nouns are always singular. No indefinite articles come with noncount nouns. No indefinite articles come with noncount nouns. Exercise on Page 107 </li> <li> Slide 8 </li> <li> Noncount Nouns Refer to a whole Refer to a whole furniture furniture Abstractions Abstractions luck luck Phenomena of Nature Phenomena of Nature sunshine sunshine Some nouns can be either count or noncount nouns, but they differ in meanings. Some nouns can be either count or noncount nouns, but they differ in meanings. hair; light hair; light </li> <li> Slide 9 </li> <li> Unit Expressions a spoonful of sugar a spoonful of sugar a glass of milk a glass of milk a cup of coffee a cup of coffee a piece of paper a piece of paper a piece of jewelry a piece of jewelry a bag of flour a bag of flour a bar of soap a bar of soap a pound of meat a pound of meat a head of lettuce a head of lettuce </li> <li> Slide 10 </li> <li> Some Common Noncount Nouns Whole group Whole group Fluid Fluid Solids Solids Gases Gases Particles Particles Abstractions Abstractions Languages Languages Fields of study Fields of study Recreation Recreation Activities Activities Natural Phenomena Natural Phenomena Exercises on Pages 109-111 See Page 108 </li> <li> Slide 11 </li> <li> Dont forget articles! Definite article: The Definite article: The --used before definite nouns --used before definite nouns Indefinite articles: A, an Indefinite articles: A, an --used before singular indefinite count nouns --used before singular indefinite count nouns --use an if the following word starts with a vowel; otherwise, use a --use an if the following word starts with a vowel; otherwise, use a Exercises on Pages 113-118 </li> <li> Slide 12 </li> <li> Irregular Plural Nouns Chart 7-1 on page 100 Chart 7-1 on page 100 Exercises on Pages 101-102 </li> <li> Slide 13 </li> <li> Using Nouns as Modifiers When a noun is used as a modifier, it is in its singular form. When a noun is used as a modifier, it is in its singular form. vegetable soup vegetable soup When a noun used as a modifier is combined with a number expression, the noun is singular and a hyphen (-) is used. When a noun used as a modifier is combined with a number expression, the noun is singular and a hyphen (-) is used. a five-year-old boy a five-year-old boy </li> <li> Slide 14 </li> <li> Expressions of Quantity one, each, every one, each, every two, both, a couple of, a few two, both, a couple of, a few several, many, a number of several, many, a number of (used with count nouns) (used with count nouns) a little, much, a great deal of a little, much, a great deal of (used with noncount nouns) (used with noncount nouns) no, some/any, a lot of/lots of no, some/any, a lot of/lots of plenty of, most, all plenty of, most, all (used with both count and noncount nouns) (used with both count and noncount nouns) Exercises on Pages 120-124 </li> </ul>

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