Welcome back! Revisit your goals Get snacks and chat! Add quotes! @CAST_UDL | #UDL (C) CAST 20141.

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<p>PowerPoint Presentation</p> <p>Welcome back!Revisit your goalsGet snacks and chat!Add quotes!@CAST_UDL | #UDL (C) CAST 2014 1</p> <p>Pause for a moment to consider why you signed up for this workshop. What are your personal and professional goals? You can write your goals and revisit often to be sure you are on the path to reach your target goals.Write, record, draw, build, tell an elbow buddy1Overall Workshop GoalsDay 1:To learn how UDL addresses challenge of learner variability</p> <p>Day 2:To discuss how UDL applies to lesson design To build new resources &amp; tools</p> <p>@CAST_UDL | #UDL (C) CAST 2014 2To meet these goals, we will provide multiple means of representing content, of being able to act with the content, and to engage with the objectives. (we will model UDL!)Knowing how people learn can purposefully design learning environments2</p> <p>UDL Connect for online resourcesSign Up: http://community.udlcenter.org/ Join our group: UDL May 2015http://community.udlcenter.org/group/udl-may-20153@CAST_UDL l #UDL (c) CAST 20153Participate during the Institute#UDLConcept mapVisual word wallBuild, sculptDiscuss(c) CAST 2014 #UDL4Logistics &amp; Review Day 1David Rose, guest speakerUDL lesson designLunchMore tools and ideas: break outs!Next steps</p> <p>Agenda: Day 2@CAST 2015 #UDL5</p> <p>Systematic Variability: where are you with your learning?@CAST_UDL | #UDL (C) CAST 2014 6</p> <p>Brain images from study by: Steven E. Peterson, Hanneke VanMier, Julie A. Fiez &amp; Marcus E. Raichle</p> <p>Learners vary systematically over time.Individuals preferences and skills change over time (for example, we mature and we approach learning differently, but even as we move from novice in a subject area toward becoming experts, we approach learning differently) </p> <p>For example, this series of PET scan images shows the difference in a single persons brain over time as they develop expertise. In the first image, the learner is using a lot of glucose to learn, particularly in the frontal lobe or strategic network, in the second the task the learner is now practiced and burns much less glucose. In the third image, the learner is transferring knowledge to a new situation and he/she burns some but not as much glucose. All students regardless of how we label them, follow this continuum of learning. </p> <p>We account for variability across time very well in our communities and learning environments. For example, we would never expect a baby to do the same things that we would expect an adult to do. Similarly, we would never expect a 6-year-old student to do the same work as a 15-year old student. We dont do as well with variability across contexts. But well talk a little more about that later.</p> <p>Images: Teaching Every Student in the Digital Age: Universal Design for Learning (Permiso concedido)</p> <p>6</p> <p>Systematic Variability: where are you with your learning?@CAST_UDL | #UDL (C) CAST 2014 7</p> <p>Learners vary systematically over time.Individuals preferences and skills change over time (for example, we mature and we approach learning differently, but even as we move from novice in a subject area toward becoming experts, we approach learning differently) </p> <p>For example, this series of PET scan images shows the difference in a single persons brain over time as they develop expertise. In the first image, the learner is using a lot of glucose to learn, particularly in the frontal lobe or strategic network, in the second the task the learner is now practiced and burns much less glucose. In the third image, the learner is transferring knowledge to a new situation and he/she burns some but not as much glucose. All students regardless of how we label them, follow this continuum of learning. </p> <p>We account for variability across time very well in our communities and learning environments. For example, we would never expect a baby to do the same things that we would expect an adult to do. Similarly, we would never expect a 6-year-old student to do the same work as a 15-year old student. We dont do as well with variability across contexts. But well talk a little more about that later.</p> <p>Images: Teaching Every Student in the Digital Age: Universal Design for Learning (Permiso concedido)</p> <p>7</p> <p>Systematic Variability: where are you with your learning?@CAST_UDL | #UDL (C) CAST 2014 8</p> <p>Learners vary systematically over time.Individuals preferences and skills change over time (for example, we mature and we approach learning differently, but even as we move from novice in a subject area toward becoming experts, we approach learning differently) </p> <p>For example, this series of PET scan images shows the difference in a single persons brain over time as they develop expertise. In the first image, the learner is using a lot of glucose to learn, particularly in the frontal lobe or strategic network, in the second the task the learner is now practiced and burns much less glucose. In the third image, the learner is transferring knowledge to a new situation and he/she burns some but not as much glucose. All students regardless of how we label them, follow this continuum of learning. </p> <p>We account for variability across time very well in our communities and learning environments. For example, we would never expect a baby to do the same things that we would expect an adult to do. Similarly, we would never expect a 6-year-old student to do the same work as a 15-year old student. We dont do as well with variability across contexts. But well talk a little more about that later.</p> <p>Images: Teaching Every Student in the Digital Age: Universal Design for Learning (Permiso concedido)</p> <p>8Your 3-2-1 feedback: @CAST_UDL | #UDL (C) CAST 2014 99What is UDL?Through a metaphorGoals, context, variability, UDL guidelines (expression, representation, engagement)</p> <p>UDL is like a UDL is because</p> <p>@CAST_UDL | #UDL (C) CAST 2014 10</p> <p>UDL GuidelinesRecognition: what Multiple means representation</p> <p>Strategy: howMultiple means of action &amp; expression</p> <p>Affect: whyMultiple means of engagement</p> <p>@CAST_UDL | #UDL (C) CAST 2014 11The three principles come from understandings of what learning really isCog science, neuroscience, what comprises learning, what are the differences between individual learnersThree simple principles for any learning situation, how does individual pick up info, show what they know, and engage with the learningThree main components of nervous system, but also educators, information, ability to make sense of it, ability to express and act on the world, and the ability to be motivated, take action, reach your goals, achieve results you care about.Psychology education and neuroscienceFrom what we have learned in the neurosciences we have developed our three principles of UDL. </p> <p>Education goal, not to provide information or even specific skillsNeed learners who are expert, best at what they can beKnowledgeable, know a lot, be able to do a lot of things, take information, express it well, act effectively on the world, strategies for being effective, not passiveAnd finally expert learners are driven by wanting to learn more, seem incredibly interested and focused, motivated, to learn even more11UDL Guidelines</p> <p>@CAST_UDL | #UDL (C) CAST 2014 12Welcome, David Rose!@CAST_UDL | #UDL (C) CAST 2014 13Break</p> <p>@CAST_UDL | #UDL (C) CAST 2014 14UDL Guidelines</p> <p>@CAST_UDL | #UDL (C) CAST 2014 15Affective Network: why of learningEvaluate &amp; set priorities, respond and assess surroundings, what motivates or inhibits our behaviors</p> <p> -Rose, 2012 </p> <p>Affective-interior middle surface of the brain-evaluate and set priorities-Most important, if the kids arent engaged, the other networks might not even matter. -Always judging and evaluating things</p> <p>Example-See textbooks: identify with recognition netwokrk-Monitor how you feel about it with affective network (whether its safe, threatening, etc.)-brain is always constructing reality, not just passively receiving it</p> <p>-scare you or are new are VERY important to you</p> <p>16Emotions: shelves that hold cognitive glassware</p> <p>EMOTIONS= shelves#UDL CAST 201417When there is brain damage to emotion centers, IQ, memory, personality are all intact, however learning suffersRead, watch Mary Helen Immordino-Yang discuss the importance of emotions for learning:TED talk: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=85BZRVE6M0oWe Feel Therefore We Learn (pdf article): http://olms.noinc.com/olms/data/resource/8038/Week%204_Article%20We%20Feel%20Therefore%20We%20Learn.pdf</p> <p>Emotions used to be thought of as toddlers in china shop (getting in the way of things and order), now they are seen as the shelves, without them cognition has less supportWhy does someone do a math problem? Intrinsic to extrinsic:Wants to learn, get a good grade, avoid punishment, please parents, get into good school, etc.</p> <p>17Variability in engagement</p> <p>@CAST_UDL | #UDL (C) CAST 2014 1818 Variability in affect#UDL CAST 201419</p> <p>This diagram shows the way that a nervous system responds when appraising a situation. The horizontal axis shows a continuum of an organisms appraisal of a situationthe way the organism views the implications of the situation for itself (from pleasant to unpleasant). This is called the valence. The vertical axis shows the levels of arousal of the organisms nervous system (from low to high) in different appraisal states. Take an example, a person is sitting in the doctors office and appraises a situation as relatively boring (unpleasant). Depending on the persons goal (for example, s/he needs to see the doctor) the person may opt for boredom for a short time. This results in deactivation of the nervous system to a fairly low level. (#1 above)However, the nervous system seeks novelty and/or challenge and so s/he decides to have a conversation or read a magazine to bring arousal more toward equilibrium. (#2 above)Conversely, full arousal of the nervous system (either tense or alert) requires attention and hence, energy. Therefore, the nervous system seeks to reduce arousal toward equilibrium. As a teacher in what way is this useful? </p> <p>19Share Ideas! Options for Recruiting InterestOffer choice, autonomyAuthentic, relevant examplesMinimize threats/distractions</p> <p>-students vary systematically-chart flipped bc if students arent engaged then the rest of the networks dont matter-want to recruit interest20</p> <p>@CAST_UDL | #UDL (C) CAST 2014 21Perceived Resources vs. Demands-connects nicely to way we give feedback -can shape whether students think they have the resources to meet demands</p> <p>For additional reading, consider Vygotskys Zone of Proximal Development (http://www.simplypsychology.org/Zone-of-Proximal-Development.html) and Czikszentmihalyis Flow theory: http://www.ted.com/talks/mihaly_csikszentmihalyi_on_flow.html21Share Ideas! Options for sustaining effortClear goalsResources to meet demandsCollaborationMastery-oriented feedback</p> <p>Think about the re-design of a lesson. In what ways can you design for variability in motivation and self assessment?22Offer feedback</p> <p>Jona has never enjoyed writing. In fact, he avoids it. When he does write, it is often unorganized and messy. One class he surprises you with a well written comparative essay on pancakes and waffles! </p> <p>How do you praise him?23Carol Dweck, Mindset400 5th graders in 12 NYC schools Do a puzzle, given feedback:A. you must be smart at this </p> <p>B. you must have worked really hard ~20% drop in score on similar tasks</p> <p> 90% worked hard, interested in their mistakes, improved skill</p> <p>(C) CAST 2014 l #UDL24</p> <p>View more, especially tied to math and persistence: motionmathgames.com/how-to-praise-your-child-and-a-growth-mindset/</p> <p>24Fixed v- Growth MindsetFixed: skills are innateSmartA naturalAvoid challenge (effort is bad)Growth mindset: build skillsHard work, effort, persistProcessLearn from critique</p> <p>(C) CAST 2014 l #UDL25</p> <p>Fixed mindset: belief that intelligence is innate-want to look smart and therefore-avoid challenges, give up easily, see effort as pointless, ignore useful feedback</p> <p>Growth mindset: Intelligence is developed-want to learn-embrace challenges, persist in setbacks, see effort as part of mastery, learn from criticism</p> <p>Mastery-oriented feedback (Dweck, 2006)Fixed vs. growth mindset-deterministic mindset, wants to look smart vs. open to mistakes and learning</p> <p>Mindset, Carole Dweck (2006)http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ICILzbB1Obg</p> <p>25Mastery Oriented Feedback</p> <p>Mindset, Carole Dweck (2006)http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ICILzbB1Obg</p> <p>http://youtu.be/NWv1VdDeoRY Praise and Mindsets</p> <p>26Offer feedback</p> <p>Jona has never enjoyed writing. In fact, he avoids it. When he does write, it is often unorganized and messy. One class he surprises you with a well written comparative essay on pancakes and waffles! </p> <p>How do you praise him?27Share Ideas! Options for Self-regulationCoping strategiesSelf-assessment &amp; reflection</p> <p>Think about the re-design of a lesson. In what ways can you design for variability in motivation and self assessment?28Summary: UDL Guidelines</p> <p>@CAST_UDL | #UDL (C) CAST 2014 2929Experience a LessonTo experience a lesson (aligned with a standard)Goal, material, methods, assessment</p> <p>To reflect on the design: UDL frameworkWhat works?Other ideas do you have to improve?What is practical and usable in your practice?How does the practice align to theory?30A-E: You are from another country and are just learning English.</p> <p>F-J: You have a hard time concentrating in class. </p> <p>K-O: You are a struggling reader.</p> <p>P-S: You are an A student who consistently performs above average.</p> <p>T-Z: You generally do not like this class.</p> <p>First letter of your last name, assume the identity: How do you feel during the lesson?</p> <p>31CCSS: Standard 19.17Write a short explanation of a process that includes a topic statement, supporting details, and a conclusion.</p> <p>Lesson design: GOAL Write, draw, type, tweet, email, puffy paint, 32CCSS: Standard 19.17Write a short explanation of a process that includes a topic statement, supporting details, and a conclusion.</p> <p>ExpressLesson design: GOAL Write, draw, type, tweet, email, puffy paint, 33CCSS: Standard 19.17Write a short explanation of a process that includes a topic statement, supporting details, and a conclusion.</p> <p>Express how to make salsa</p> <p>Lesson design: GOAL 34CCSS: Standard 19.17Write a short explanation of a process that includes a topic statement, supporting details, and a conclusion.</p> <p>Express how to make salsa:a topic statement, supporting details about the process, a conclusion sentence.</p> <p>Lesson design: GOAL 35Discuss the goalTopic sentence: Key idea, interesting</p> <p>3 supporting details: About process, first, next, finally</p> <p>Conclusion sentence: tell them what you told them</p> <p>36Options to...</p>