Uncle Sam's Acresby Marion Clawson

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  • Clark University

    Uncle Sam's Acres by Marion ClawsonReview by: Wesley CalefEconomic Geography, Vol. 28, No. 1 (Jan., 1952), pp. 90-91Published by: Clark UniversityStable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/141627 .Accessed: 08/05/2014 19:16

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  • ECONOMIC GEOGRAPHY ECONOMIC GEOGRAPHY ECONOMIC GEOGRAPHY

    ment Types and Contrasts" (21) no mention is made of line settlements, conspicous in south- ern Louisiana, southeastern Canada (both French), and certain parts of Europe. At least some sociologists recommend agricultural line settlements because they combine the advan- tages of dispersed settlements with those of nucleated or village settlements.

    Question 2 on p. 22 asks, "What is the only source of energy in the solar system?" Since this question follows a treatment of the solar system, "old Sol" is clearly indicated. Now we also have atomic power-at least to sear and shatter things-and what about the tides and the pull of gravity (setting temperature condi- tions aside)?

    In conclusion I must again return to the hills. Aside from making a casualty of all Kansas hills -not to mention our mountains-the text also obliterates the Newer Appalachian " Mountains " and shrinks the Older Appalachians. The cap- tion for Figure 161 reads, "The Hilly lands of eastern North American constitute a barrier between the east coast and the interior. The St. Lawrence and Hudson-Mohawk routes are the only lowland corridors through the hilly barrier" (p. 229). In other words, we now have to tell our students that the barriers our sturdy, intrepid forefathers had such difficulty in nego- tiating were the " hills " of eastern North America and that easy passes around the " hills " had to be sought in the above-mentioned lowlands (and perhaps the Cumberland Gap). So speaks the text.

    WALTER M. KOLLMORGEN

    University of Kansas

    The Geographic Regions of Puerto Rico, by RAFAEL PIC6. xiii and 256 pp.; maps, ills., diagrs., bibliogr. University of Puerto Rico Press, Rio Piedras, P.R., 1950. 94 x 6 inches.

    No person could write with more authority on the geographic regions of Puerto Rico than Rafael Pic6. He has been President of the Puerto Rican Planning Board since its inception in 1942, he was elected President of the American Society of Planning Officials in 1949, and again in 1950, and he has already made significant con- tributions to various aspects of geography. The Geographic Regions of Puerto Rico is based on the author's Ph.D. dissertation (Clark Uni- versity, 1938), but the material "has undergone numerous changes in order to bring it up to date."

    Eleven regions have been delimited on the island of Puerto Rico, largely on the basis of such physical factors as topography, soils, and climate. However, historical factors are not neglected, and the economic and social climate is studied as assiduously as the physical climate.

    The big problem of Puerto Rico is to minimize

    ment Types and Contrasts" (21) no mention is made of line settlements, conspicous in south- ern Louisiana, southeastern Canada (both French), and certain parts of Europe. At least some sociologists recommend agricultural line settlements because they combine the advan- tages of dispersed settlements with those of nucleated or village settlements.

    Question 2 on p. 22 asks, "What is the only source of energy in the solar system?" Since this question follows a treatment of the solar system, "old Sol" is clearly indicated. Now we also have atomic power-at least to sear and shatter things-and what about the tides and the pull of gravity (setting temperature condi- tions aside)?

    In conclusion I must again return to the hills. Aside from making a casualty of all Kansas hills -not to mention our mountains-the text also obliterates the Newer Appalachian " Mountains " and shrinks the Older Appalachians. The cap- tion for Figure 161 reads, "The Hilly lands of eastern North American constitute a barrier between the east coast and the interior. The St. Lawrence and Hudson-Mohawk routes are the only lowland corridors through the hilly barrier" (p. 229). In other words, we now have to tell our students that the barriers our sturdy, intrepid forefathers had such difficulty in nego- tiating were the " hills " of eastern North America and that easy passes around the " hills " had to be sought in the above-mentioned lowlands (and perhaps the Cumberland Gap). So speaks the text.

    WALTER M. KOLLMORGEN

    University of Kansas

    The Geographic Regions of Puerto Rico, by RAFAEL PIC6. xiii and 256 pp.; maps, ills., diagrs., bibliogr. University of Puerto Rico Press, Rio Piedras, P.R., 1950. 94 x 6 inches.

    No person could write with more authority on the geographic regions of Puerto Rico than Rafael Pic6. He has been President of the Puerto Rican Planning Board since its inception in 1942, he was elected President of the American Society of Planning Officials in 1949, and again in 1950, and he has already made significant con- tributions to various aspects of geography. The Geographic Regions of Puerto Rico is based on the author's Ph.D. dissertation (Clark Uni- versity, 1938), but the material "has undergone numerous changes in order to bring it up to date."

    Eleven regions have been delimited on the island of Puerto Rico, largely on the basis of such physical factors as topography, soils, and climate. However, historical factors are not neglected, and the economic and social climate is studied as assiduously as the physical climate.

    The big problem of Puerto Rico is to minimize

    ment Types and Contrasts" (21) no mention is made of line settlements, conspicous in south- ern Louisiana, southeastern Canada (both French), and certain parts of Europe. At least some sociologists recommend agricultural line settlements because they combine the advan- tages of dispersed settlements with those of nucleated or village settlements.

    Question 2 on p. 22 asks, "What is the only source of energy in the solar system?" Since this question follows a treatment of the solar system, "old Sol" is clearly indicated. Now we also have atomic power-at least to sear and shatter things-and what about the tides and the pull of gravity (setting temperature condi- tions aside)?

    In conclusion I must again return to the hills. Aside from making a casualty of all Kansas hills -not to mention our mountains-the text also obliterates the Newer Appalachian " Mountains " and shrinks the Older Appalachians. The cap- tion for Figure 161 reads, "The Hilly lands of eastern North American constitute a barrier between the east coast and the interior. The St. Lawrence and Hudson-Mohawk routes are the only lowland corridors through the hilly barrier" (p. 229). In other words, we now have to tell our students that the barriers our sturdy, intrepid forefathers had such difficulty in nego- tiating were the " hills " of eastern North America and that easy passes around the " hills " had to be sought in the above-mentioned lowlands (and perhaps the Cumberland Gap). So speaks the text.

    WALTER M. KOLLMORGEN

    University of Kansas

    The Geographic Regions of Puerto Rico, by RAFAEL PIC6. xiii and 256 pp.; maps, ills., diagrs., bibliogr. University of Puerto Rico Press, Rio Piedras, P.R., 1950. 94 x 6 inches.

    No person could write with more authority on the geographic regions of Puerto Rico than Rafael Pic6. He has been President of the Puerto Rican Planning Board since its inception in 1942, he was elected President of the American Society of Planning Officials in 1949, and again in 1950, and he has already made significant con- tributions to various aspects of geography. The Geographic Regions of Puerto Rico is based on the author's Ph.D. dissertation (Clark Uni- versity, 1938), but the material "has undergone numerous changes in order to bring it up to date."

    Eleven regions have been delimited on the island of Puerto Rico, largely on the basis of such physical factors as topography, soils, and climate. However, historical factors are not neglected, and the economic and social climate is studied as assiduously as the physical climate.

    The big problem of Puerto Rico is to minimize

    the pressure of a rapidly increasing population on the agricultural resources of the island. From 1899 to 1939 sugar acreage increased sevenfold while acreage in food crops increased only 2}/6 times. The challenge is being met by increasing the per-acre yields of land, by fostering industries which will tend to absorb some of the surplus rural population, and by encouraging migration to areas where the migrants will be well received. Governments everywhere are increasingly being held responsible for certain social and economic services to the electorate, and the insular government has not lagged behind; it has taken the initiative in many phases of the economic life of the island.

    Attacks on the problems of the island are typified by the La Plata project, a rural rehabili- tation unit of the Mennonite Church of North America in the "Humid East Central Moun- tains." Here "some of the evils of the agricul- tural set-up" in the island "Land concentration, absentee ownership, and excessive, unjustified crop specialization are being dealt another heavy blow" (p. 172). . . . "The present program consists of four phases of rural service, medical, recreational and educational, agricultural and religious." This is only one of many important projects. The Insular Department of Agriculture is just about to complete a detailed Land Use Survey of the entire island. Dr. Pic6 played a leading role in pushing this survey from the project to the action level.

    This is a balanced study. The author skillfully presents economic and social factors in historical perspective against the physical background of Puerto Rico in the evolution of the present cultural landscape of the island.

    RAYMOND E. CRIST

    University of Maryland

    the pressure of a rapidly increasing population on the agricultural resources of the island. From 1899 to 1939 sugar acreage increased sevenfold while acreage in food crops increased only 2}/6 times. The challenge is being met by increasing the per-acre yields of land, by fostering industries which will tend to absorb some of the surplus rural population, and by encouraging migration to areas where the migrants will be well received. Governments everywhere are increasingly being held responsible for certain social and economic services to the electorate, and the insular government has not lagged behind; it has taken the initiative in many phases of the economic life of the island.

    Attacks on the problems of the island are typified by the La Plata project, a rural rehabili- tation unit of the Mennonite Church of North America in the "Humid East Central Moun- tains." Here "some of the evils of the agricul- tural set-up" in the island "Land concentration, absentee ownership, and excessive, unjustified crop specialization are being dealt another heavy blow" (p. 172). . . . "The present program consists of four phases of rural service, medical, recreational and educational, agricultural and religious." This is only one of many important projects. The Insular Department of Agriculture is just about to complete a detailed Land Use Survey of the entire island. Dr. Pic6 played a leading role in pushing this survey from the project to the action level.

    This is a balanced study. The author skillfully presents economic and social factors in historical perspective against the physical background of Puerto Rico in the evolution of the present cultural landscape of the island.

    RAYMOND E. CRIST

    University of Maryland

    the pressure of a rapidly increasing population on the agricultural resources of the island. From 1899 to 1939 sugar acreage increased sevenfold while acreage in food crops increased only 2}/6 times. The challenge is being met by increasing the per-acre yields of land, by fostering industries which will tend to absorb some of the surplus rural population, and by encouraging migration to areas where the migrants will be well received. Governments everywhere are increasingly being held responsible for certain social and economic services to the electorate, and the insular government has not lagged behind; it has taken the initiative in many phases of the economic life of the island.

    Attacks on the problems of the island are typified by the La Plata project, a rural rehabili- tation unit of the Mennonite Church of North America in the "Humid East Central Moun- tains." Here "some of the evils of the agricul- tural set-up" in the island "Land concentration, absentee ownership, and excessive, unjustified crop specialization are being dealt another heavy blow" (p. 172). . . . "The present program consists of four phases of rural service, medical, recreational and educational, agricultural and religious." This is only one of many important projects. The Insular Department of Agriculture is just about to complete a detailed Land Use Survey of the entire island. Dr. Pic6 played a leading role in pushing this survey from the project to the action level.

    This is a balanced study. The author skillfully presents economic and social factors in historical perspective against the physical background of Puerto Rico in the evolution of the present cultural landscape of the island.

    RAYMOND E. CRIST

    University of Maryland

    Uncle Sam's Acres, by MARION CLAWSON. xvi and 414 pp.; maps, diagrs., index. Dodd, Mead & Co., New York, 1951. $5.00. 82 x 52 inches.

    The Federal Government owns about a fifth of all the land within the borders of continental United States.

    For some time there has been need of a book dealing rather comprehensively with these Public Lands. Marion Clawson, Director of the Bureau of Land Management (which administers the second largest chunk of Public Lands), has produced such a book under the title Uncle Sam's Acres.

    He begins with a few general remarks about the Public Lands and then treats consecutively their acquisition, disposal and reservation-that is, withdrawals for National Forests, Taylor Graz...