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2004 NATA CONVENTION ISSUE

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Page 1: Training & Conditioning 14.4

TRAINING CONDITIONING

May/June 2004Vol. XIV, No. 4$5.00

&

AGILITY ANTICSAGILITY ANTICSMaking agility drills more fun and functionalMaking agility drills more fun and functional

NATANATAConvention

IssueConvention

Issue◆ Trying out Prehab◆ A Look at Supplement

Contamination

Page 2: Training & Conditioning 14.4

Circle No. 1

NATA Booth no. 1107Request No. 1

Page 3: Training & Conditioning 14.4

F EATURES

D EPARTMENTS

C ONTENTS

Training & Conditioning • May/June 2004 • Vol. XIV, No. 4

P.13

◆ Spec ia l Focus ◆

The Wrong Stuff..........13Your athletes can be penalized for taking banned substances, even when they’re trying to avoid them. Here’s a look at the prevalence of contaminated nutritional supplements and how to steer clear of them.By R.J. Anderson

◆ Opt imum Per formance ◆

Agility Antics..........23Why are Tennessee Titans tossing footballs into garbage cans and throwing tiny balls with their left hands? It’s all part of a new trend tomake agility drills more fun and functional.By Guillermo Metz

◆ Management ◆

Race Against Time..........37For many athletic trainers, every day feels like a race against time. But itdoesn’t have to be that way. This author suggests strategies for afternooncrunch time, scheduling, and rethinking your duties.By John Reynolds

◆ Treat ing The Ath le te ◆

From Back to Front..........49At Ohio State University, athletic trainers are attempting to prevent injuries before they start through a carefully designed prehab program.By Doug Calland

◆ Sideline ◆

Researching Heat Cramps..........3

◆ Comeback Athlete Award ◆

Wrestler overcomes elbow injury..........4Nomination form..........8

◆ Bulletin Board ◆

Catching Injuries … Tissue Engineering … Buying AEDs..........10

NATA Show Planner..........59NSCA Convention Spotlight.........86

◆ Compet i t ive Edge ◆

Center of Strength..........91Size is only part of the mixture that makes a great post player. Strength,agility, and footwork are what keep centers on the ball.By Jackie Ansley

Advertisers Directory..........98Scouting Report: Chest & Back..........99Catalog Showcase..........101More Products..........104Climate Control..........103Web News..........102

NEW: CEU Quiz for T&C Readers..........112

P.91

P.37

P.49

On the cover: Peter Sirmon plays Powerball, an agilitydrill used during Tennessee Titan preseason practices.Article begins on page 23. Photo by Donn Jones.

Page 4: Training & Conditioning 14.4

Marjorie Albohm, MS, ATC/LDirector of Sports Medicine andOrthopaedic Research,Orthopaedics Indianapolis

Jon Almquist, ATCSpecialist,Fairfax County (Va.) Pub. SchoolsAthletic Training Program

Brian Awbrey, MDDept. of Orthopaedic Surgery,Massachusetts General Hospital,and Instructor in Orthopaedics,Harvard Medical School

Jim Berry, MEd, ATC,SCAT/EMT-BDirector of Sports Medicineand Head Athletic Trainer,Myrtle Beach (S.C.) High School

Leslie Bonci, MPH, RDDirector, Sports MedicineNutrition Program,University of PittsburghMedical Ctr. Health System

Christine Bonci, MS, ATCAsst. A.D. for Sports Medicine,Women’s Athletics,University of Texas

Cynthia “Sam” Booth, ATC, PhDManager, Outpatient Therapyand Sportsmedicine,MeritCare Health System

Debra Brooks, CNMT, LMT, PhDCEO, Iowa NeuroMuscularTherapy Center

Cindy Chang, MDHead Team Physician,University of California-Berkeley

Dan Cipriani, MEd, PTAssistant Professor,Dept. of Physical Therapy,Medical College of Ohio

Gray Cook, MSPT, OCS, CSCSClinic Director,Orthopedic & Sports Phys. Ther.,Dunn, Cook, and Assoc.

Bernie DePalma, MEd, PT, ATCHead Athl. Trainer/Phys. Therapist,Cornell University

Lori Dewald, EdD, ATC, CHESAthletic Training ProgramDirector and Associate Professorof Health Education, University of Minnesota-Duluth

Jeff DiltsDirector, Business Development& Marketing, National Academyof Sports Medicine

David Ellis, RD, LMNT, CSCSSports Alliance, Inc.

Boyd Epley, MEd, CSCSAsst. A.D. & Dir. of Athletic Perf.,University of Nebraska

Peter Friesen, ATC, NSCA-CPT,CSCS, CAT, Head Ath. Trainer/Cond. Coach, Carolina Hurricanes

Lance Fujiwara, MEd, ATC, EMTDirector of Sports Medicine,Virginia Military Institute

Vern Gambetta, MAPresident, Gambetta SportsTraining Systems

Joe Gieck, EdD, ATC, PTDirector of Sports Medicine andProf., Clinical Orthopaedic Surgery,University of Virginia

Brian Goodstein, MS, ATC,CSCS, Head Athletic Trainer, DC United

Gary Gray, PTPresident, CEO,Functional Design Systems

Maria Hutsick, MS, ATC/L, CSCSHead Athletic Trainer,Boston University

Christopher Ingersoll, PhD,ATC, FACSMDirector,Graduate Programs in SportsMedicine/Athletic TrainingUniversity of Virginia

Jeff Konin, MEd, ATC, MPTAssistant Professor of Athletic Training, James Madison University

Tim McClellan, MS, CSCSDirector of Perf. Enhancement,Makeplays.com Center forHuman Performance

Michael Merk, MEd, CSCSDirector of Health & Fitness,YMCA of Greater Cleveland

Jenny Moshak, MS, ATC, CSCSAsst. A.D. for Sports Medicine,University of Tennessee

Steve Myrland, CSCSOwner, Manager, Perf. Coach,Myrland Sports Training, LLCInstructor and Consultant,University of Wisconsin SportsMedicine

Mike Nitka, MS, CSCSDirector of Human Performance,Muskego (Wisc.) High School

Bruno Pauletto, MS, CSCSPresident,Power Systems, Inc.

Stephen Perle, DC, CCSPAssociate Prof. of Clin. Sciences,University of BridgeportCollege of Chiropractic

Brian Roberts, MS, ATCDirector,Sport Performance & Rehab. Ctr.

Ellyn Robinson, DPE, CSCS, CPTAssistant Professor,Exercise Science Program,Bridgewater State College

Kent Scriber, EdD, ATC, PTProfessor/Supervisor ofAthletic Training,Ithaca College

Chip Sigmon, CSCSStrength and Conditioning Coach,Carolina Medical Center

Bonnie J. Siple, MS, ATCCoordinator, Athletic TrainingEducation Program & Services,Slippery Rock University

Chad Starkey, PhD, ATCAssociate Professor,Athletic Training Educ. Program,Northeastern University

Ralph Stephens, LMT, NCTMBSports Massage Therapist,Ralph Stephens Seminars

Fred Tedeschi, ATCHead Athletic Trainer,Chicago Bulls

Terrence Todd, PhDCo-Director, Todd-McLeanPhysical Culture Collection,Dept. of Kinesiology & HealthEd., University of Texas-Austin

2 ◆ T&C M A Y / J U N E 2 0 0 4 ◆ A T H L E T I C B I D . C O M

Training & Conditioning (ISSN 1058-3548) ispublished monthly except in January andFebruary, May and June, and July andAugust, which are bimonthly issues, for atotal of nine times a year, by MAG, Inc., 2488N. Triphammer Rd., Ithaca, NY 14850. T&Cis distributed without charge to qualified pro-fessionals involved with competitive athletes.The subscription rate is $24 for one year and$48 for two years in the United States, and$30 for one year and $60 for two years inCanada. The single copy price is $5.Copyright© 2004 by MAG, Inc. All rightsreserved. Text may not be reproduced in anymanner, in whole or in part, without the per-mission of the publisher. Unsolicited materi-als will not be returned unless accompaniedby a self-addressed, stamped envelope.POSTMASTER: Send address changes toTraining & Conditioning, P.O. Box 4806,Ithaca, NY 14852-4806.

Printed in the U.S.A.

Publisher Mark Goldberg

Editor-in-ChiefEleanor Frankel

Circulation Director Mark Shea

Associate & Assistant EditorsDennis Read Kenny BerkowitzDavid Hill Laura SmithGuillermo Metz RJ Anderson

Editorial AssistantGreg Scholand

Art DirectorLeslie Carrère

Production ManagerKristin Ayers

Assistant Production ManagerKristi Kempf

Production Assistants Jonni Campbell Hildi Gerhart

Prepress ManagerAdam Berenstain

Prepress Assistant Steve Rokitka

IT ManagerMark Nye

Business ManagerPennie Small

Special ProjectsDave Wohlhueter

Administrative AssistantsSharon Barbell Amy WaltonDaniela Reis

Advertising Materials CoordinatorMike Townsend

Advertising Sales AssociatesDiedra Harkenrider(607) 257-6970, ext. 24Sheryl Shaffer(607) 257-6970, ext. 21

T&C editorial/business offices: 2488 N. Triphammer RoadIthaca, NY 14850 (607) 257-6970Fax: (607) [email protected]

Editorial BoardTRAINING & CONDITIONING • May/June 2004 • Vol. XIV, No. 4

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By E. Randy Eichner, MD, FACSM

Last year, medical staff from theUniversity of Oklahoma (OU) and sci-entists from the Gatorade SportsScience Institute (GSSI) studied OU’sfootball team to help solve the problemof full-body heat cramps. The new andvital information from their research isnow being used to help athletes exer-cise more safely in the heat.

Players heat up fast during trainingExercising in the heat places one of themost demanding physiological stresseson the body. Still, how much do wereally know about the heat load playersface during agility, strength and sprinttraining in the summer?

To answer this key question,researchers monitored core tempera-tures in eight linemen during a condi-tioning session in June. The ambienttemperature was 76 degrees F and rela-tive humidity was 77 percent.

Each player swallow a vitamin-sizedradiopill temperature sensor that broad-cast his core temperature to a handheldreceiver placed near his abdomen or back. This battery-poweredspace-age pill, developed by NASA and tested in astronauts, soldiersand cold-water swimmers, emits a low-frequency radiowave thatvaries by temperature and provides a continuous gauge of core tem-peratures. Measurements were taken every 10 minutes during the 95-minute workout that comprised:

● 30 minutes of field agility drills with weighted vest.● 43 minutes of strength training.● 22 minutes of sprinting.

Even though players wore only wore t-shirts and shorts, core tempera-tures rose fast. From around normal, their core temperatures climbedto between 101 to 102 degrees during the field drills, stayed at thatlevel during strength training, and went as high as 103 degrees in thefinal sprinting. One player, who reached a zenith of nearly 104degrees, suffered major heat cramping.

It’s clear that, even in June’s only moderate heat and not wearing football gear, players training hard can heat up fast.

Crampers lose more saltthan non-crampersA second study was designed to determine:

● Causes of full-body muscle cramping in the heat.

● Practical ways to prevent it.

Researchers measured players’sweat rates and sweat electrolytelosses during two-a-day footballpractices in August. They comparedfive cramp-prone players to fiveplayers with no history of cramping.

Both groups lost small and similaramounts of potassium in sweat, buttheir sweat sodium losses werestarkly different. Crampers were"salty sweaters," losing twice thesodium in sweat as non-crampers.The salt drain in crampers wasstunning. In one day of two-a-days,they lost an average of five tea-spoons of salt in sweat, and oneplayer lost nine teaspoons!

Crampers also had higher sweatrates and so dehydrated more thannon-crampers.

Sodium-rich diets prevent heat illness and crampingThis core-temperature research suggests that football players need tobe monitored for signs and symptoms of heat illness even during relatively moderate ambient heat stress, such as pre-season summer conditioning.

The heat-cramping study implies: 1) The roots of full-body heat cramping are muscle fatigue,

dehydration and salt depletion; and 2) Practical prevention hinges on hydration and sodium.

Having players increase the amount of sodium in their diet candecrease the incidence of full-body muscle cramps. This can be done by:● Ingesting a properly formulated sports drink.● Adding salt to foods.● Placing pretzels in team meetings.● Touting other healthful foods high in sodium, such as tomato juice,

soups, and pickles.

E. Randy Eichner, MD, FACSM, is the team internist for the University ofOklahoma football team.

Practical Research Protects Football Players from the Heat

For more information on heat cramping please visit the Sports Science Center at www.gssiweb.com.

Crampers were "salty sweaters," losing twice the sodium in sweat as

non-crampers.

Page 6: Training & Conditioning 14.4

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4 ◆ T&C M A Y / J U N E 2 0 0 4 ◆ A T H L E T I C B I D . C O M

hree brothers, three wrestlers, three state titles. Andthree mysterious, debilitating injuries—on the samespot, for the same condition.

The youngest brother would go on to win yetanother state high school title with a piece of his right elbowbolted together, and his spirit strengthened during his rehab bythe knowledge that his big brothers made it through the samechallenge.

Just five months before earning his first state title, DonnieJones went under the knife to have a screw inserted in hiselbow to bolt his olecranon physis (growth plate) to the ulnabone. Like his older brothers Vertus and Greg, Donnie Joneshad failures of fusion of the olecranon physis during wrestlingseason. “The doctors are pretty sure it is a genetic condition,”says Jones. “But there aren’t any studies, so they can’t reallyprove it.”

As a 130-pound freshman, Jones complained of right pos-terior elbow pain after pushing off of another wrestler duringa tournament. “My initial assessment was a strain of the tri-ceps tendon at the insertion onto the olecranon,” says JesseTownsend, MS, ATC, Athletic Trainer for Greensburg Salem(Pa.) High School. “He was only in moderate pain and wasstill wrestling effectively, so I taped his elbow to assist withelbow extension, and to keep it from fully extending—whichwas where he felt the most pain. But knowing the history ofhis brothers’ injuries [though Townsend never treated Vertusor Greg], I knew that this condition was certainly a differen-tial diagnosis.”

Jones’s injury was familiar to Randy Parsley, HeadWrestling Coach at Greensburg Salem. “When Donnie firsttold me his elbow was hurting, I said, ‘Not again!’” he says.“With Donnie having it as a freshman, and not being asphysically mature, we really didn’t know how he was going

to react.” Since the pain was tolerable and he was winning, Jones

did not want to see a doctor during wrestling season. Joneswent on to run hurdles as a member of the track team in thespring and held off having the surgery until the first day of thenext school year. On Aug. 28, 2002, Patrick McMahon, MD,an Orthopedic Surgeon at the University of PittsburghMedical Center (UPMC), treated Jones with an open reduc-tion and internal fixation. Twelve days after the surgery, Jonesbegan working with Townsend in the athletic training room.His goal was to be ready for the first day of wrestling practice,which was 11 weeks away.

“I didn’t really know what the rehab process was going tobe like,” says Jones. “But I knew I was going to be in thewrestling room on the first day of practice.”

A defensive end on the football team, Jones was forced tosit out his entire sophomore season while he rehabbed his sur-gically repaired elbow. That season proved especially diffi-cult.

“Walking into the weightroom and seeing all my team-mates hanging out and joking around was tough,” says Jones.“There I was rehabbing off to the side—not able to participatein any of the fun. But, I have to say, wanting to be back aroundmy teammates really pushed me to attack my rehab.”

Jones was encouraged by family history. Eight years ear-lier, during his senior season, Jones’s oldest brother, Vertus,had sustained the same elbow injury. He, too, finished out theseason before undergoing surgery. Vertus went on to becomea three-time NCAAAll-American at West Virginia University.

Greg, the middle brother, was diagnosed with the samecondition midway through his junior season. He also finishedR.J. Anderson is an Assistant Editor at Training & Conditioning.

The good and bad of following in yourbrothers’ footsteps.

Keeping Up with the Joneses

T

By R.J. Anderson

Plagued by the same elbow problems as his older brothers, DonnieJones still wrestled his way to two state championships.

T&C’s Comeback AthleteMay/June 2004 Winner

Page 7: Training & Conditioning 14.4

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out the season, by the end of which hesustained a shoulder injury. Surgerywas planned for both, but pre-op X-raysshowed that his olecranon physis hadre-fused on its own, so only his shoul-der was operated on. Greg went on towin a state championship in his seniorseason and later claimed two NCAANational Championships for WestVirginia, the most recent in 2004.

Donnie figured that if his brotherscould make it back to top form, hecould, too. He would also have them inhis corner when he needed encourage-ment. “They were definitely there tosupport me,” says Jones. “They told menot to slack off, because hard workwould pay off down the line.”

Jones says that Vertus, now anAssistant Wrestling Coach at NorthHills (Pa.) High School, frequentlyshared exercises and advice. Jones tooksome of those exercises and advice toTownsend, who integrated them intothe rehab program.

“At the beginning, the big barrierwas his range of motion,” saysTownsend, who worked with Jones atthe school’s facilities an hour and a halfeach day, five days a week. “He waslacking 20 degrees of extension—hecouldn’t straighten his elbow out. Mygoals were to eliminate his pain andreturn his strength and range of motionin time for wrestling season.”

Townsend says that because of therarity of the injury, he couldn’t find anyathletic trainers who had heard of it, letalone treated it. After researching on theInternet and corresponding withMcMahon, Townsend was able todesign a rehab program for Jones.

The first week mainly consisted ofapplying heat and ultrasound, alongwith stretching exercises such as wristflexion/extension and elbow exten-sion/flexion/supination/pronation.Townsend also prescribed progressive-resistance exercises using dumbbells oftwo to five pounds. After the first week,low-resistance Thera-band exercisesdesigned to work on shoulder andelbow flexion/extension were incorpo-rated into the program.

During the first couple of weeks,Jones experienced mild pain during

activities such as brushing his teeth anddrinking from a glass. He also lackedrange of motion in his elbow, and hisstrength was still well below normal.

By week four, Jones graduated tomore strength-building exercises suchas wall push-ups, push-ups on knees,and broom handle wrist flexion/exten-sion drills. But he still lacked 13degrees of extension and continued tohave weakness with elbow flexion/extension.

Townsend says by week five,Jones felt good, and noticed mild painonly with changes of weather. By then,he lacked only nine degrees of exten-sion in his elbow. He began running andhand-walking on a stepper machine,and did some non-contact, non-weight

bearing functional wrestling drills. Healso progressed to standard push-ups inplace of knee push-ups.

Jones went back to see McMahonduring the sixth week. X-rays showedthat the screw was in place and that thebone had fused properly—the surgeryhad worked.

“I was so relieved,” says Town-send. “With the bone healed, we knewwe could move forward into heavy lift-ing and get aggressive with strengthen-ing the triceps and getting his range ofmotion back.”

For the next three weeks, Jonesstepped up the intensity and beganPlyoball exercises, along with heavyweightlifting. With an emphasis onstrengthening the triceps, Townsendhad Jones perform tricep pull-downs,butterflies, bench/incline presses, mili-tary presses, dips, progressive resistiveexercises with dumbbells, pull-ups, andexercises on the tackle and pullovermachines. Jones also jumped rope, didbox push-ups, and timed “wheelbar-row” exercises.

“For me, the most difficult part ofDonnie’s rehab was when it came timeto really strengthen his elbow and toregain range of motion,” saysTownsend. “The hardest part was ridingthat fine line between being as aggres-sive as possible and being careful not todo any damage.”

Eleven weeks after the surgery—and coinciding with the first day ofwrestling practice—Jones was clearedto resume full participation in athletics.There was no swelling in the elbow butthe joint continued to lack about ninedegrees of extension. Within a month,however, Jones’s elbow was at fullstrength and he had full range of motionand full extension.

A protective pad on his right elbowwas the only indicator that Jones wasstill concerned about the joint. Midwaythrough the season the pad came off.For Townsend, that was a sign thatJones was all the way back.

Once the season was under way,Townsend’s work with Jones was pret-ty much over. “Wrestling is so demand-ing that just going to practice and com-peting in matches was therapy enough,”

Award Winner

Donnie JonesGreensburg Salem (Pa.)

High School

◆ Sport: Wrestling

◆ Injury: Failures of fusion of the olecranon physis

◆ Comeback Team: Jesse Townsend, MS, ATCPatrick McMahon, MD

Comeback Athlete

6 ◆ T&C M A Y / J U N E 2 0 0 4 ◆ A T H L E T I C B I D . C O M

Page 9: Training & Conditioning 14.4

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says Townsend. “He was constantlytraining his muscles, so I wasn’t tooworried about him losing any strengthin his elbow.”

When the 2002-03 season ended,Jones had a 38-2 record, and wrestledhis way to a state championship at 130pounds. Both the title and the come-back put him on par with his brothers.But Jones may have surpassed them abit in 2003-04, when he capped off anundefeated junior season by winning asecond-straight state championship—this time at 140 pounds.

“Donnie was one of the most com-pliant and hard-working patients I’veever dealt with,” says Townsend. “Heput a lot of trust in me and was willingto do whatever I wanted him to.

“And to Donnie’s credit, once hissophomore season started, he neverused the injury as an excuse,” addsTownsend. “I wish everyone under-stood that not only did he win a statechampionship that year, but he won itjust months after major surgery.”

Parsley gives a lot of credit toTownsend for Jones’s successfulreturn. “The work that Jesse does withour athletes is unbelievable,” saysParsley. “I tell people all the time thatJesse’s the most important guy in ourathletic department. I have all the faithin the world in his ability.

“He tells all the kids straight upwhat it’s going to take for them toreturn from an injury,” Parsley adds.“Then he makes it enjoyable for themto do the workouts.”

Jones agrees, saying, “He kept theworkouts interesting, and he kept meon task. When I was down and didn’tfeel like doing something, he wouldalways tell me to stay with it.”

Next year Jones will be a senior,and besides running track and playingfootball, he will be gunning for histhird state wrestling championship. Asto where he’s planning to go to college,Jones hasn’t made any commitmentsyet.

“People think that because bothmy brothers went to West Virginia,that’s where I’m going,” says Jones.“But I’m keeping my options open—Iwant to see what’s out there.” ◆

Comeback Athlete

NOMINATION FORM

Name of Athlete_______________________________________________

Your Name____________________________________________________

Your Affiliation________________________________________________

Your Phone No.____________________

Your Address__________________________________________________

Send nominations to: Comeback Athlete Award, Training & Conditioning2488 N. Triphammer Rd. Ithaca, NY 14850

If you have any questions, feel free to call us at (607) 257-6970, ext. 18

Nomination Criteria and Procedures

Comeback Athlete Award

he Comeback Athlete AwardProgram serves to honorthose outstanding athleteswho have successfully re-turned to competition in theirsport following a serious

injury. It also serves to recognizethose people who worked with theathlete behind the scenes: thephysician who set up the treatmentplan, the physical therapists andathletic trainers who oversaw therehabilitation process, and thestrength coach and sport coach whohelped the athlete regain his or hercompetitive form.

CRITERIA FOR NOMINATIONS:Starting with our fall 2003 issues,we will no longer judge comebackathletes within a specific category(e.g., High School Male, CollegeFemale). Rather, we will honor acomeback athlete every other issue,regardless of level of play or gen-der. So send in your nominations assoon as you have a candidate youfeel fits the bill!

TO NOMINATE AN ATHLETE: Please fill in the form below,attaching a 500- to 1,000-word des-cription of the athlete’s rehab pro-gram, which includes the followingpoints:

• The athlete’s injury, including cause and severity.• The physician’s initial medicalassessment and treatment protocol.• The details of the rehabilitationprogram.• The details of the athlete’s condi-tioning program prior to returningto competition.• The degree of success the athleteachieved upon returning to compe-tition.• Dates of when the above oc-curred.• Names, titles, and phone numbersof those physicians, athletic train-ers, other sports medicine profes-sionals, and coaches who played amajor role in the athlete’s come-back.

T

8 ◆ T&C M A Y / J U N E 2 0 0 4 ◆ A T H L E T I C B I D . C O M

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A T H L E T I C B I D . C O M ◆ T&C M A Y / J U N E 2 0 0 4 ◆ 9

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Female ATCs Make Small StridesAccording to the results of a recent study, the number of female head athletic trainers at NCAA schools continues to rise slowly, but still represents less than a third of all such positions. The latest study fromLinda Carpenter, PhD, JD, and R. Vivian Acosta, PhD, both ProfessorEmeritae at Brooklyn College, shows that nearly 40 percent of Division IIIschools have female head athletic trainers, but that figure drops to justabove 20 percent at Division I. Still, that is an increase of 2.7 percent and4.4 percent, respectively, since 2000.

The number of schools employing full-time athletic trainers—eithermale or female—also continues to increase, with the highest numbers inDivision I (99.9 percent) and the lowest in Division III (91.8 percent). Thatis up from 96.7 percent and 89.0 percent, respectively, in 2000.

The study focuses on women’s status in intercollegiate sports andshows that while female participation rates continue to grow, the percentage of female head coaches is only 0.1 percent above the all-timelow of 44.0 percent. Women also continue to lag far behind men when itcomes to filling head administrative positions, with only 18.5 percent ofwomen’s programs directed by a female administrator.

A copy of the 2004 study, “Women in Intercollegiate Sport, ALongitudinal, National Study: Twenty Seven Year Update 1977-2004,” isavailable at webpages.charter.net/womeninsport or through the NationalAssociation for Girls and Women in Sports (NAGWS) at (703) 476-3450 orwww.nagws.org.

Catchers’ Hands Still VulnerableBaseball catchers receive as many as 150 pitches per game, plus upwardsof a hundred while warming up pitchers. And that’s just on game day.New research shows that despite improvements in catchers’ gloves, all thatcatching adds up to microtrauma in the hand, particularly to the bloodvessels.

Researchers from Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Centerlooked at 36 minor league players who played various positions. The moststriking finding was that most catchers had an enlarged index finger ontheir catching hand—an average of 5 mm larger than their non-catchinghand—as well as common complaints of pain, weakness, tingling, ornumbness in their glove hand, even when at rest. The increased fingersize correlated with abnormal blood flow along the ulnar artery.

According to the researchers, the study shows that microvascularchanges are occurring before the catchers develop obvious ischemia intheir hands. It also points out the need for further improvement in catchers’ gloves. Their findings were presented at April’s annual meetingof the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons.

Tissue Engineering May Trump SurgeryWhy have surgery for a torn meniscus when you can just grow a new one?It sounds like science fiction now, but some researchers think it may bereality by the end of the decade.

Researchers at the University of Colorado and Massachusetts GeneralHospital have been working on developing artificial matrices on which togrow cells. Recently, the Colorado researchers were able to growosteoblasts—cell precursors of bone—on a polyethylene glycol (PEG)hydrogel. Within a few years, they think they’ll be able to inject the PEGgel into areas of the body and regrow broken or damaged bone or cartilage.

PEG hydrogel is the latest and most promising matrix for growingthree-dimensional tissue, according to the researchers. It can be injected asa liquid that turns into a jelly-like substance when light is shined on it. Thisgel acts as scaffolding on which chemical signals can be embedded to tellthe body what to grow there. The scaffolding is biodegradable so that itdissolves after the bone or cartilage is built up, leaving natural tissue.

The latest studies can be found in the Journal of Biomedical MaterialsResearch (Nuttelman CR, Tripoldi MC, Anseth KS. “In Vitro OsteogenicDifferentiation of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells Photoencapsulated inPEG Hydrogels.” March 2004, Vol. 68A, No. 4) and Clinical Plastic Surgery(Randolph MA, Anseth KS, Yaremchuk MJ. “Tissue Engineering ofCartilage.” Oct. 2003, Vol. 30, No. 4).

More AEDs for LessOne of the largest medical equipment distributors in the United States isworking hard to make AEDs more affordable, with the ultimate goal ofputting them in every school in the country. Safety Services Network solicits donations from corporations, foundations, and private individualsfor grants that help pay for the devices. In the past year alone, the com-pany has helped fund AED purchases by groups such as public schools,churches, and volunteer fire departments, according to Rebecca McCulley,SSN’s AED Program Coordinator and Grant Director.

The grants help pay part of the cost of one or more AEDs. In a typical arrangement, SSN may cover the cost of a third device when twoare purchased. Go to www.aedinfo.com or call (800) 530-9989 for moreinformation and a grant application.

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If you have any news or interesting trivia items you would like to contributeto T&C’s Bulletin Board, please e-mail them to [email protected],or fax them to (607) 257-7328.

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reestyle swimmer KickerVencill was supposed to betraining this spring for theAthens Olympics. Instead, heis working at Home Depot.

In January 2003, the 25-year-old Vencill was inIrvine, Calif., preparing forthe Pan-Am Games, when he

tested positive for a steroid precursorbanned by the USOC—19-norandro-sterone, a byproduct of nandrolone—and was given a four-year suspensionby the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency(USADA). Vencill was shocked by thetest results. He maintains he neverknowingly took a banned substance,but must have ingested it in his multi-

vitamins, which had apparently beentainted with the steroid precursor.

His claims were buttressed by thelow amounts of norandrosterone—four nanograms per milliliter—foundin his blood. The suspension wasreduced to two years, and a USADAofficial told the LA Times that the pos-itive test result likely stemmed fromcontamination.

Last summer, running back MikeCloud was suspended from theNational Football League for fourgames after testing positive formetabolites of the steroid nandrolone.Cloud also claimed he had neverknowingly taken steroids and submit-ted the dietary supplements he wastaking to the league for testing. One ofthe supplements, a chocolate-flavoredprotein powder Cloud purchased at a

A T H L E T I C B I D . C O M ◆ T&C M A Y / J U N E 2 0 0 4 ◆ 13

◆ S P E C I A L F O C U S ◆

The Wrong Stuff The Wrong Stuff Your athletes can be

penalized for taking

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BY R.J. ANDERSON

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© John Miller

A contaminated nutritional supplement has kept KickerVencill, once an Olympichopeful, out of competitionfor two years.

Page 16: Training & Conditioning 14.4

nutrition store, was shown to havenandrolone among its ingredientsalthough it was not mentioned on theproduct’s label. Despite the NFL’sadmission that Cloud was likelyduped by the manufacturer, the sus-pension was upheld due to theleague’s zero-tolerance policy.

The results were announcedwhile Cloud, then a free agent, wasseeking a new contract. Despite a pro-ductive 2002 season, the best offer hereceived was to play for the leagueminimum. Cloud has since filed alawsuit against the manufacturers ofthe protein powder.

Professional sports teams, Olym-pic committees, and the NCAA areworking hard to rid athletics ofsteroids. Caught in the wake of theseefforts are a handful of athletes who arebeing suspended for taking what theybelieved to be legal products. Withcareers at stake, is consuming anynutritional supplement a game ofRussian roulette? Or are there steps youcan take to help your athletes avoidunknowingly taking banned sub-stances?

NO REGULATION

“It’s definitely a buyer beware market,”says Cindy Thomas, ATC, Marketingand Account Director for the NationalCenter For Drug Free Sport, Inc., aKansas City-based organization thatoversees drug testing for the NCAAand the NFL. “Because there is basical-ly no regulation of the dietary supple-ment industry, consumers have noguarantee that a label accuratelyreveals what is or isn’t in a bottle.”

According to the Dietary Supple-ment Health and Education Act(DSHEA) of 1994, dietary supple-ments are not classified as drugs, so

they are not subject to FDA regula-tion. The act defines supplements asequivalent to foods and assumes themto be safe unless the FDA has evi-dence to the contrary. Many expertspoint to the lack of regulation as thedriving force behind the supplementindustry’s boom over the last 10

years. Manufacturers are not requiredto register their companies or theirproducts with the FDA, and there areno FDA regulations to establish mini-mum manufacturing standards fordietary supplements.

“There is a risk when taking anydietary supplement,” says Thomas. “Itcan relate to the quantity of ingredientslisted or the presence of substances inthe bottle that aren’t listed on thelabel.”

As proof, a 2001 InternationalOlympic Committee study found that15 percent of tested supplements fromaround the world contained steroid pre-cursors that weren’t listed on the label.Among products sold in the U.S. orover the Internet, 19 percent werefound by the study to be tainted.

“There is a distinct possibility thatsome companies may knowingly omitfrom their labels ingredients that are inthe bottle,” Thomas says, “but therealso may be companies that includebanned substances in a supplement’singredients and don’t know it. Manymanufacturers use the same equipmentto make different kinds of supplements.For a company that makes some sup-plements that contain steroid precur-sors, trace ingredients from a productcontaining banned substances may beleft over on a mixing machine. If thatmachine isn’t cleaned thoroughly, itcan later contaminate another supple-ment that isn’t meant to contain thebanned substance.”

14 ◆ T&C M A Y / J U N E 2 0 0 4 ◆ A T H L E T I C B I D . C O M

◆ S P E C I A L F O C U S ◆

A 2001 study found that 15 percent of tested supplements

from around the world contained steroid precursors that

weren’t listed on the label. In the U.S. … 19 percent were

found by the study to be tainted.

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A T H L E T I C B I D . C O M ◆ T&C M A Y / J U N E 2 0 0 4 ◆ 15

◆ S P E C I A L F O C U S ◆

When contamination occurs, traceamounts of a banned substance may becarried in an otherwise legal supple-ment. These miniscule levels are prob-ably not enough to enhance an athlete’sperformance, but they can be enough toproduce a positive test result.

OUTSIDE TESTING

In an article this spring in the NewarkStar-Ledger, Scott Strickland, a reliefpitcher for the New York Mets, saidhe submitted requests to have hisdietary supplements tested for bannedsubstances by his team as well asMajor League Baseball. Strickland,whose urine will be randomly testedby MLB at some point during the2004 season, ingests 23 pills threetimes a day, which are prepared by alaboratory in Colorado called RX-1and were suggested by his personaltrainer. Still, as the cloud surroundingthe Bay Area Laboratory Cooperative(BALCO) continues to hover over anumber of MLB stars, Strickland

wants to make sure his urine sampledoesn’t turn out dirty.

“There’s vitamins and minerals,and creatine,” Strickland told the Star-Ledger, “but they could put Viagra inthere for all I know.”

The Mets informed Strickland thatthe club was not equipped to test thepills, and MLB did not immediatelyrespond to Strickland’s request either.Though he received a list of the ingre-dients contained in the pills, as well asa document from the lab assuring himthere is nothing illegal in the supple-ments, Strickland does not want to takeany chances. “I’m totally confidentthere is nothing in there that’s illegal,”he said. “But I just want to be absolute-ly positive. This is my career.”

Even with the clout that comeswith being a big league baseball play-er, Strickland has been unable to find away to verify what’s in his supple-ments. So imagine the difficulties thata typical high school or college athletewould face if he or she wanted to do

the same thing. The good news is thata growing list of third-party testingcompanies are stepping up to the plateto help out.

One of those companies is NSFInternational, a non-profit organizationbest known for its environmental test-ing. This winter, the NFL and the NFLPlayers Association (NFLPA) askedNSF to test and certify dietary supple-ments for its players, which NSF hasbegun to do. Manufacturers foot thebill for the testing, which entails NSFscreening products twice a year forpurity of ingredients, banned sub-stances, bioavailability (how the prod-uct breaks down so that it may be usedby the body), and correct labeling, aswell as auditing the manufacturers’production facilities and laboratoriesfor proper manufacturing practices.

In addition, manufacturers thatwant to be considered for theNSF/NFL/NFLPA program cannot beinvolved with production of supple-ments containing banned substances.

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A T H L E T I C B I D . C O M ◆ T&C M A Y / J U N E 2 0 0 4 ◆ 17

◆ S P E C I A L F O C U S ◆

This is intended to eliminate the possi-bility of inadvertent contamination.

If a product passes, the manufac-turer earns the right to display theNSF/NFL/NFLPA seal of approval onthe label, and the product is added to alist of approved supplements circulat-ed among NFL players. KathyPompliano, General Manager for NSFInter-national’s Dietary SupplementCerti-fication division and overseer ofthe program, says products bearing theNSF/NFL/NFLPA seal will be avail-able to the general public sometime inMay. She adds that, “Neither NSF northe NFL or its players associationendorse any products, nor are theyreceiving any money directly to bene-fit them.”

Along with the NFL/NFLPA pro-gram, NSF also offers an establishedcertification program co-sponsored bythe National Nutritional FoodsAssociation (NNFA), the largestdietary supplement trade association inthe United States. The NSF/NNFA

Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP)certification is similar to the NSF/NFL/NFLPA program, except it doesnot test for banned substances. If aproduct satisfies NSF/NFFA’s GMPcriteria, a “GMP Certified” seal is puton the bottle.

Julie Burns, MS, RD, CCN, asports nutritionist whose clientsinclude the Chicago Bears and theChicago Blackhawks, says she trusts

the GMP seal of approval, but warnsthat some companies put misleadingclaims on their labels. “Their labelsmight say, ‘GMP Compliant’ or‘Exceeds GMP Standards,’ but thatdoesn’t mean it has the GMP seal ofapproval—which says ‘GMP Cert-ified,’” she explains. “These compa-nies try to make it look like they’veopened up their production facilities toget audited—and many times theyhaven’t.”

Another company providing a sealof approval for dietary supplements isU.S. Pharmacopeia (USP), a non-prof-it organization that has tested supple-ments for purity and performed pro-duction facility audits since 2002. Inaddition to a base-testing fee, USPcharges manufacturers a fee for eachbottle its seal appears on.

Because this testing is so expen-sive, from $12,000 to $25,000 forsome products, many manufacturersdon’t apply for any type of certifica-tion. But that doesn’t mean their

Some companies put misleading claims on

their labels. “Their labelsmight say, ‘GMP

Compliant’ or ‘ExceedsGMP Standards,’ but thatdoesn’t mean it has theGMP seal of approval.”

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products will escape scrutiny.Since 1999, ConsumerLab.com

has been pulling dietary supplementsfrom store shelves, testing products foringredient purity, bioavailability, andlabel accuracy. And for the most part,they’ve been doing it on their owndime.

After testing a dozen or so prod-ucts from each category, and screeningmultiple bottles of each brand tested,the company posts the results on itsWeb site. The company gains themajority of its revenue through sub-scriptions to its Web site, which liststhe products that passed the testing andthose that failed to meet their stan-dards. Non-subscribers are privy onlyto information on companies that pass,and pay for, voluntary testing.

Tod Cooperman, MD, President ofConsumerLab.com, says that 15 per-cent of his Web site’s subscribers arehealth care professionals and that over1.7 million people visit the site eachyear. The company does not test for

banned substances or perform audits ofmanufacturing facilities for productsthat appear on the Web site, but it doesscreen a large volume of dietary sup-plements for ingredient purity andlabel accuracy.

“We try to get a good sampling ofwhat is out there and test the biggest-selling products,” says Cooperman.“We also try to sample one or twosmaller brands in a category.” To date,they have tested over 1,000 dietarysupplements from over 250 manufac-turers, and Cooperman estimates thatone out of every four supplements test-ed fails to meet ConsumerLab.comstandards. If a product does fail, it issubmitted to an independent laboratoryto have the findings verified.

“We’ve found that how hard acompany tries to meet standardsdepends on how lucrative each partic-ular market is,” says Cooperman.“Like with echinacea, the market hasgone down in the last three years, andso has the quality. With chondroitin

the opposite has happened—the mar-ket has grown significantly, and sohas the manufacturers’ focus.”

READING LABELS

While the emergence of drug-testingcompanies is a big step forward inmonitoring the supplement industry, itis only one step. The GMP, USP, andConsumerLab.com programs do nottest for banned substances, which iswhat athletes most often need to knowabout a supplement. In response, manysports nutritionists recommend educat-ing athletes about how to read labelsand decipher ingredient names.

With more than 3,000 dietary sup-plement products on the shelves,coaches and athletic trainers cannot beexpected to recognize and evaluateevery single ingredient, but they canfamiliarize themselves with problemat-ic ingredients. The first step is know-ing what is banned by relevant govern-ing bodies (see “Resources” sidebar onpage 19). Next, decide what is and is

18 ◆ T&C M A Y / J U N E 2 0 0 4 ◆ A T H L E T I C B I D . C O M

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A T H L E T I C B I D . C O M ◆ T&C M A Y / J U N E 2 0 0 4 ◆ 19

◆ S P E C I A L F O C U S ◆

not considered acceptable in your ath-letic program. From there, you can keyin on uncovering substances your ath-letes should not be ingesting.

Chris Rosenbloom, PhD, RD,nutrition consultant for the GeorgiaTech athletic department and anAssociate Professor at Georgia StateUniversity, suggests looking out forany supplements that are labeled asprohormones. “Anything that’s sup-posed to mimic the effects of anabolicsteroids can get you into trouble,” shesays. Examples of prohormonesinclude 4-androstenediol (andro),which converts to testosterone, and 19-norandrostenedione, which converts tonandrolone.

Rosenbloom also suggests stayingaway from potential fat burners.“Products like Xenadrine, EFX, andHydroxycut are fat burners that maycontain ephedrine or synephrine,” sheexplains.

Thomas advises looking for dis-crepancies in names for a particularingredient. “Take ephedrine for exam-ple,” she says, “It can be listed asephedra, epitonin, ma huang, sidacordifolia, or sinica, among otherthings.” Thomas adds that caffeine—asubstance banned above a certain levelby the NCAA and IOC—can be listedas guarana, kola nut, maté, Paulliniacupana, or tea extracts.

Mike Perko, PhD, CHES, Asso-ciate Professor and Health Coordinatorat the University of North Carolina-Wilmington, and author of Taking OneFor the Team—Young Athletes andDietary Supplements, suggests you redflag anything that says, “You mayexperience heart palpitations, nervous-ness, or anxiety.” It may containephedra under another name, or a prod-uct similar to ephedra. “Either way,”says Perko, “those are not normal cen-tral nervous reactions I would wantwhen taking any kind of drug or sup-plement.”

Cooperman says to look out fornew ingredients. “Typically, newer andmore expensive ingredients have moreproblems. Especially when there is alot of hype around a new supplementand the demand has outstripped the

supply,” he says. “That’s when badmaterials enter the market—especiallywhen it’s a higher-priced ingredient.”Cooperman says his laboratory seesproblems with herbals more often thannon-herbals because they are muchmore complex and subject to more

problems at different stages of produc-tion—from growing, harvesting, andprocessing to shipping and storage.

Cooperman also advises con-sumers to take a harder look at multivi-tamins. “It’s funny, because with multi-vitamins, most of the ingredients are

www.ncaa.orgFor a printable PDF that includes a complete listing of substancesbanned by the NCAA, click “Rules and Eligibility” then click “DrugTesting.”

www.usantidoping.orgThis site contains printable PDFs listing substances banned by theInternational Olympic Committee (IOC) and World Anti-Doping Agency(WADA). There are two sizes of PDF available: enlarged and wallet-sized.

www.nsf.orgNSF International is partnering with the National Football League andthe NFL Players’ Association to provide a seal that certifies a dietarysupplement is safe to be ingested by NFL players. The NSF/NFL/NFLPAseal is the only certification that verifies a product has been tested forbanned substances. The Web site also details NSF’s agreement with theNational Nutritional Foods Association (NNFA) to provide a testing pro-gram that screens dietary supplements for ingredient purity, bioavail-ability, label accuracy, and good manufacturing practices (GMP).

www.ConsumerLab.comThe site lists manufacturers that meet ConsumerLab.com’s standards foringredient purity, label accuracy, and bioavailability. Unlike other drug-testing companies, ConsumerLab.com lists those manufacturers thatdon’t meet its testing requirements.

www.usp.orgU.S. Pharmacopeia audits production facilities to ensure good manufac-turing practices and screens for ingredient purity, bioavailability, andlabel accuracy.

www.drugfreesport.comClick “Dietary Supplement Information” for background material onsports nutrition and dietary supplements. Click “Resource ExchangeCenter” for information on Drug Free Sport’s Dietary SupplementResource Exchange Center, a subscription service for institutions wish-ing to provide athletics staff and athletes with accurate and confidentialinformation about dietary supplements and dangerous and/or bannedsubstances.

www.fda.govFor information on the dietary supplement industry and the FDA’s role inindustry regulation, enter “dietary supplements” into the search window.

Resources

Page 22: Training & Conditioning 14.4

pretty straightforward,” he says. “Butbecause of the complexity of mixture,there is more opportunity for prob-lems.”

If you allow your athletes to takecreatine, Cooperman says to avoid liq-uid creatine. While not harmful, it isnot as effective. “They typically don’tcontain what they claim because crea-tine is unstable to begin with. When itis mixed with water it starts fallingapart,” says Cooperman, who adds thatcreatine powders generally passedConsumerLab.com tests.

SUPPLEMENTAL EDUCATION

The last piece of the puzzle in avoidingcontaminated supplements involvessetting up policies and educational pro-cedures that warn your athletes of therisks. It also means communicatingwith them openly on the issue.

Rosenbloom says that educationneeds to begin with policy. “Get every-one on the same page with an institu-tion-wide policy regarding supplementuse—what is allowed and what isn’t,”

she says. “Athletes should be madeaware of the policy the minute theywalk in the door. That way, if they runinto the contamination problem, theyonly have themselves to blame.”

Rosenbloom initiates policyawareness when a student-athlete takesa preseason physical. “At Georgia

Tech, we ask athletes what they aretaking and follow up with a questionasking whether they know what sub-stances are illegal,” she says. “Then weask for some examples of banned sub-stances—a lot of them can’t give any.”After the physical, each Georgia Techathlete meets with the school’s nutri-tionist to discuss the supplements theyare taking.

Purdue University also provides itsathletes with one-on-one discussions.“I try to make sure that every freshmanhas a sit-down with our dietician,” saysDennis Miller, ATC, PT, Head AthleticTrainer at Purdue. “They go over theirgoals, and we cover supplements andissues like contamination.”

Miller and his staff also talk toteams as a group. “At the beginning ofeach year we explain that the NCAA isadvertising that ignorance is no ex-cuse,” says Miller. “So we appeal tothem, ‘Please, don’t get caught up inwhat you read, and don’t fall for adver-tising that talks you into taking a sup-plement. If you’re taking something

◆ S P E C I A L F O C U S ◆

“At the beginning of eachyear we explain the NCAAis advertising that igno-

rance is no excuse. So weappeal to our athletes: ‘Ifyou’re taking something

that is not endorsed by ourdepartment, please bring it

to us so we can sit downtogether and evaluate it.’”

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Page 23: Training & Conditioning 14.4

that is not endorsed by our department,please bring it to us so we can sit downtogether and evaluate what the claimsare, what the ingredients are, and whatthe potential hazards are.’ We makesure our athletes don’t feel that we’regoing to ostracize them or penalizethem for getting into supplements ontheir own, and that increases the levelof honesty.”

Even though they may not face thesame testing as college athletes, highschool student-athletes can benefitfrom these same measures. To promoteconsistency, Rosenbloom says thatwhen putting together a supplementpolicy, high school athletic programsshould follow the lead of their colle-giate counterparts and ban the samesubstances as the NCAA. Rosenbloomsays this helps to ensure proper healthand safety, while at the same time bet-ter prepare student-athletes for whatthey will face if they compete at thecollegiate level.

Alan Beste, Wellness Coordinatorfor the Iowa High School Athletic

Association, agrees that communicationand positive reinforcement are the keysto getting your message to athletes—which, he notes, is especially importantwhen they don’t face regular testing. “Itall starts with what you say, and silenceis not an option,” he says. “Kids inter-pret silence as a message that takingsupplements is okay with you.

“I wouldn’t say, ‘If I find out thatanyone is using ephedra, they’ll be offthe team,’” Beste adds. “That’s theway to ensure no one will tell you any-thing. Your message needs to be, ‘Thisis very dangerous, and I’m concernedabout this issue because I care aboutyou.’ Whether you leave the door openfrom the start will determine how hon-est your players will be with you aboutthe issue all year.”

Your message needn’t come pack-aged as a formal presentation either.“Take advantage of teachable mom-ents,” Beste advises. “Pay attention tocurrent events, and when you see anewspaper story about the results of anathlete using supplements, discuss it

with your players. Print copies andpost them in the locker room or passthem around. Your words have a lotmore impact when players can linkthem to something real.”

Educating parents is equallyimportant. “Parents see these supple-ments at the supermarket and think,‘If these weren’t safe, how couldstores sell them?’” Beste says. “So weneed to provide parents with the sameinformation we’re giving players. IfI’m a player taking ephedra, I’m prob-ably not going to take a pamphletabout the dangers home to my par-ents. So you need to get parentstogether and spend a few minutestelling them what your concerns areabout supplement use.”

With the uncertainty that exists inthe supplement industry, athletic train-ers must be the first line in an athlete’sdefense against contamination. Mak-ing sure your athletes are wellinformed will go a long way towardensuring they have long and healthycareers. ◆

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A T H L E T I C B I D . C O M ◆ T&C M A Y / J U N E 2 0 0 4 ◆ 23

wo elite athletes face a wall marked with a single lineat a height of about three feet. On the floor, a trape-zoid-shaped court is marked off that widens as it getsfurther from the wall. Standing about 25 feet from thewall, one of the athletes beams a tennis ball just abovethe line. His opponent races to catch it and, in oneswift motion, chucks it back at the wall. They keep atit until one of them fails to catch a rebound within one

bounce or can’t throw the ball above the line.Sounds like fun, right? Well, it is. But it’s also a highly

functional training drill used by some of the NFL’s finest.That’s right, NFL. It’s an agility-oriented, fast-paced gameSteve Watterson, CSC, ATC, Head Strength and ConditioningCoach for the Tennessee Titans, calls Wall Ball, where 300-plus-pound linemen and wily receivers try to outmaneuvereach other without tripping over their own feet.

Watterson has become a leader in designing drills that arefun, functional, challenging, reactive games tailored to targetspecific needs. He created Wall Ball to make his athletes moreambidextrous—after they get the hang of playing the gamewith both hands, he makes them play with only their non-dominant one. Being able to play handball with either handisn’t really the point. The point is to develop multiplanar bal-ance, coordination, quickness, and agility. And within a fewshort weeks, Watterson says, his athletes are doing just that.

DESIGN STAGE

The impetus for using these types of new drills varies fromcoach to coach. Some use them to address a particular defi-ciency on a team, others focus on appealing to the athletes’

T

◆ O P T I M U M P E R F O R M A N C E ◆

Agility AnticsWhy are Tennessee Titans tossing footballs into garbage cans and throwingtiny balls with their left hands? It’s all part of a new trend to makeagility drills more fun and functional.

BY GUILLERMO METZ

Wall Ball

Powerball

Guillermo Metz is an Associate Editor at Training & Conditioning.

©Do

nn J

ones

Page 26: Training & Conditioning 14.4

24 ◆ T&C M A Y / J U N E 2 0 0 4 ◆ A T H L E T I C B I D . C O M

teve Watterson, CSC, ATC,Head Strength and Con-ditioning Coach for the

Tennessee Titans, is getting a rep-utation for incorporating somepretty off-the-wall games, drills,and activities in his program. He’shad his NFL athletes involved ineverything from yoga to JaneFonda workouts. But the drills heis most proud of are those he’screated or adapted to addressspecific needs on the team.

“About six years ago,” Wat-terson says, citing one example, “Isaw that within the league,between the players’ union andthe NFL management, there weremore and more regulations onwhat a strength coach could dowith players, especially in the off-season. No helmets. No pads. Noorganized football activities. Noother coaches on the field withplays or drills.

“It was limiting the physiolog-ical response that we could get,”

he continues. “So I tried to findnew, innovative ways to still devel-op the fitness components I waslooking for.”

Thus, Powerball was born.“It’s part rugby, part basketball,part dodgeball,” Watterson says.

The game is played across thewidth of the first 40 yards of afootball field, with a large garbagecan on either end, and betweenfive and eight players on a side.

The athletes pass the ball toeach other and run with it, andthey can even throw it to them-selves. If they are touched whileholding the ball, the ball goes tothe other team. In some formula-tions of the game, if a player istouched while in possession of theball, he goes to the other team. Ifthe ball goes out of bounds, thelast person to touch it goes to theother team. A point is scored bygetting the ball in one of thegarbage cans. There’s no contactother than one-hand touch.

Every time a point is scored,the losing team has a penaltyassessed, which could be any-thing from 25 push-ups to runningacross the field and back. And tokeep things really interesting,Watterson changes the rules on

Changing the Rules

Watterson’s players demonstrate theirfavorite post-practice drill!

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A T H L E T I C B I D . C O M ◆ T&C M A Y / J U N E 2 0 0 4 ◆ 25

competitiveness, and still othersdesign them as a dynamic warmup.But all coaches agree that every drillmust be functional and purposeful—every drill must be designed with aspecific end-goal in mind.

“The design of the program is alittle more sophisticated than just com-ing up with a game to play,” saysWatterson. “We find a need and thenwe try to match it with a functionalactivity. If that functional activity canbe a game or a fun, competitive activ-ity, that’s even better.”

Two years ago, when Wattersonwas completing his postseason evalua-tions, he noticed that the majority ofhis players were what he calls “unilat-erally dominant.” “If a guy was left-handed, he was more left-handed dom-inant—they were not very ambidex-trous,” he explains. “I first noticed itspecifically with the linebackers, but Ialso saw it when I went back andlooked at other positions.”

In response, Watterson inventedWall Ball. He took handball as a tem-plate and modified it to address hisplayers’ deficiency. “When they getthe ball, they have to catch it and in a

an almost daily basis or putsobstacles on the field, like a largering of PVC pipes around eachgarbage can. He’ll also changethe ball as the players begin toadjust to the pace of the game,from a football to a basketball,then to a tennis ball, and finally tothe fastest of all, a racquetball.

Sometimes, Watterson prefersto develop certain skills with ath-letes working one-on-one, such aswith something he calls neckwrestling. “It’s basically Greco-Roman wrestling, but there’s func-tion to it,” he says. “There’s handcontrol and there are footballpositions. I’ve taken these toanother level by having athletesrun sprints between each 30-sec-ond-to-40-second bout.

“Along with that, we are usingmartial arts techniques to learnhow to most effectively get some-one else’s hands off you,”Watterson adds. “We look at howto defeat an opponent without

getting your body off balance—how to redirect the opponent soyou can continue your pathway.”

Watterson also runs the moretypical relay races and cone drills,although he carries them a bit fur-ther. “We’ll have relay races withall sorts of functional drills like highknees, back pedaling, and hop-ping,” he says. “Then we get intoimplementing specific drills withcone touches. We’ll run five or sixpatterns. Then we’ll add hurdles tojump over. Then we’ll have themnavigate over and under an obsta-cle course—they go around a fig-ure-eight pattern, pick up largewater bottles, run 20 yards, putthem down, go to a garbage can,pull out three 45-pound plates, putthem in another garbage can, grabthe water bottles, return them towhere they were originally, andthen sprint back to the starting lineand tag the next guy. Each week, Ichange the course so they don’tget used to it.”

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al Dietz, MEd, Head Strength and Condition-ing Coach at the University of Minnesota,likes to keep things interesting. For him, agili-

ty drills are, foremost, a great way to insert somevariety, fun, and excitement into training. That’s whyhis drills are always competitive and require veryquick reactions.

Many of Dietz’s drills focus on challenging ath-letes to do something with their hands and their feetat the same time. “We’ll run functional patterns forbalancing where the athletes have to run and pick uppaper cups along the way while balancing on oneleg,” he says. “I have other drills where they have tobounce a ball off a wall with each hand while they’reshuffling down the wall. In another drill, I have themjuggling a ball while they’re doing an agility ladder.”

One of his favorite drills involves a game he callsRussian-style basketball. It’s played with three teamson the court at one time, one on each end and one inthe middle.

“The team in the middle starts with the ball,”Dietz explains. “They can advance to either end ofthe court but they have to shoot the ball really fast,like within 10 seconds. If they make a basket, theyhave 10 seconds to run to the other end of the courtand try for a basket there. If they miss but get theirown rebound, they have five seconds to shoot itagain. If the other team gets the ball, it runs a fastbreak with 10 seconds to shoot at the other end ofthe court, where that third defensive team is waiting.This is a great drill for teams with large numbers ofathletes.”

Mixing It Up

C

continuous motion take a shot back atthe wall,” says Watterson. “They can’tbat it like in handball, because thatwould be too easy. And they can’t stop,re-set, and take their shot. We start outwith a tennis ball, because it’s a littleslower, and move up to a racquetball.”(See “Changing the Rules,” on page

24, for more of Watterson’s drills.)Jeff Connors, MSCC, Assistant

Athletic Director for Strength andConditioning at the University ofNorth Carolina, also spends a lot oftime making sure his drills carry overto what his players need to succeed onthe field or court. “You have to have a

goal and a purpose for any drill you’regoing to spend time doing,” he says.“When I look across the multitude ofdrills that are being published, I seevery few that have specific applica-tions. Most of them are general and arenot closely enough defined to theobjective and purpose for the athlete.

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◆ O P T I M U M P E R F O R M A N C E ◆

“For example, foot quickness isdifferent from linear speed and fromchange of direction,” he continues.“We try to make training as specific tothe activity as possible.”

Connors uses a series of drills forhis football athletes—quarterbacks,running backs, receivers, linebackers,and sometimes defensive ends andtight ends—that he calls “competitivereactives.” Each pits an offensive play-er against one or more defenders, fine-tuning their ability to react quickly totheir opponent. “Basically, what we’retrying to do is two things,” Connorssays. “We’re trying to help our offen-sive athletes learn how to shake adefender, and we’re trying to help ourdefensive athletes come to balance.”(See “Competitive Reactives,” on page32, for more on Connors’s drills.)

Cal Dietz, MEd, Head Strengthand Conditioning Coach at theUniversity of Minnesota, also empha-sizes the importance of competitivedrills. “Every drill we do is set up as arace, whether it’s conditioning, speed

development, or agility,” he says. “Youcan time each athlete separately, but Ifind it’s better to set it up as a racebetween people.

“A big motivator for any type ofdrill is chasing,” he explains. “Whenyou get chased, you run a lot faster. Itmakes everything more intense andmore game-like. If you get caught, youowe me a push-up. If the chaser doesn’tcatch the guy, the chaser owes me a

push-up. You might say, ‘a push-up, nobig deal.’ But you don’t want to be thatguy.” (See “Mixing It Up,” on page 26,for more on Dietz’s drills.)

Kevin Ebel, MEd, CSCS, Directorof Strength and Conditioning atPerformance One Athletic Develop-ment in Columbus, Ohio, who workswith many NFL players, designs hisdrills as a warmup to the weightroomwork. He uses a lot of agility laddersand cones, then adds games of catch orvisual or verbal commands to work onhis athletes’ reaction time. All of it isaimed at helping his athletes maximizethe impact of their lifting programs.

“Yeah, they’re going to developfoot speed,” Ebel says. “Yeah, they’regoing to develop quickness and bodycontrol. But we’re really using it as awarmup. If you get someone who’skind of sluggish and uncoordinated onthe ladder drills, they’re going to beuncoordinated on the lifting platformthat day as well.

“It’s a three-step process,” he con-tinues. “If you think about an Olympic

“You can find what areathe athlete is weak or

inflexible in as you workthe different quadrants …

When you find that weakness, you want to betenacious and just pick atit. Within one session, the

athlete is better at it.”

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Page 30: Training & Conditioning 14.4

gility ladders became mainstays of trainingyears ago, but there are ladder workouts andthere are ladder workouts. Kevin Ebel, MEd,

CSCS, Director of Strength and Conditioning atPerformance One Athletic Development inColumbus, Ohio, throws all sorts of complicationsinto his ladder drills to challenge his athletes anddevelop certain sport-specific skills.

“Obviously, you have to lay down the foundationfirst and run all the guys through basic ladder drillsand basic cone drills,” he says. “Then we progress tothrowing them a ball, having them play catch with theball, back and forth, as they run through the ladder orcone drill.

“In one drill, we position three agility ladders

around a box,” he continues. “They’ll start out stand-ing on the box and while they’re up there, we’ll shoutout a drill, and they have to immediately jump downand run that pattern. Or, while they’re in the air, we’llpoint to one of the ladders, directing them to go lat-erally or forward or whatever.”

Ebel also has a mirror drill, where athletes have torun patterns on ladders that are the opposite of whatEbel or another player is doing. In another drill, Ebelstarts athletes out facing a wall while on a ladder. He’llthen throw a ball against the wall, which the athletehas to catch. “They have to react quickly because theydon’t see where the ball is coming from,” he says.“They just see it bouncing off the wall. And they con-tinue doing that ladder drill as they catch the ball.”

Ladder to New Heights

A

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lift, you have to move as fast as youcan in a controlled fashion. That’s thesame premise behind agility drills. Ifyou get someone doing agility drillswell, they’re going to have a goodchance of success in the Olympic lifts.And that way we’ll get the most out ofthose lifts, which translates to

improved performance on the field.”On leg days in the weightroom,

Ebel’s reactive warmup drills focus onfoot and hip speed, with a lot of for-ward and backward motion and somebounding. On upper-body days, he hashis players work primarily on hipmobility and upper-body quickness

rather than foot speed.Even though they’re used for

warming up, Ebel doesn’t downplaythe design of the drills. He stresses thereactive element above all. “You caneasily have a pattern of drills and foot-work, whether it be on the agility lad-ders or with cones,” he says, “but then,

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Page 32: Training & Conditioning 14.4

all they’re doing is memorizing specif-ic foot patterns. Unless they’re beingforced to react, it’s not going to trans-fer well to sport. You have to buildreaction into it, whether that’s to asound or a visual cue.” (See “Ladder toNew Heights,” on page 28, for more onEbel’s drills.)

Like Ebel, Peter Friesen, CSCS,ATC, CAT, PT, CPT, Head AthleticTrainer and Strength and ConditioningCoach for the NHL’s Carolina Hur-ricanes, also uses reactive drills as a

warmup, especially right before agame. “They just involve throwing atennis ball to an athlete,” Friesen says.“Obviously, that’s pretty straightfor-ward, but what’s interesting is that itworks all aspects of an athlete’s fitness,and it can be fine-tuned to work anyspecific part as needed.”

By throwing the ball increasinglyfast, Friesen develops his athletes’focus, quickness, and hand control.And by working in a series of lungeswhile they’re being asked to catch the

ball, athletes are building core strengthand functional flexibility.

“You can find what area the ath-lete is weak or inflexible in as youwork the different quadrants,” Friesensays. “When you find that weakness,you want to be tenacious and just pickat it and pick at it. Within one session,the athlete is better at it. You can reallywork on their shortcomings.

“This is far more functional coretraining than traditional core training,”he continues. “And the guys are hav-ing fun.”

ALL IN THE IMPLEMENTATION

Some words of warning: Don’t run outand have your athletes play Wall Ball assoon as you put down this issue. A keyelement to making these types of drillswork is easing your athletes into them.

“No matter if an athlete has beenwith us for a month or for five years,they always start off with the mostbasic drills at the start of the off-sea-son,” says Ebel. “When we start themon the most basic drills, we’re focusingon making sure they keep their centerof gravity in one place, so when weopen them up and have them boundingall over the place, they have the basiccontrol down. We generally start offwith an emphasis on foot speed, and asthat increases, we get into the bound-ing drills and the more reactive typesof things and the change of direction.”

Throughout the progression, everytime a new drill or twist is introduced,Ebel and his staff make sure the ath-letes know exactly what is expected ofthem and what they’re trying to get outof the drill. “Whatever they’re doing,we always explain the drill first andgive them three or four targets to focuson,” he says. “We’re very critical, veryhands-on, constantly giving them feed-back. And if we see something that’sabsolutely horrible, we stop everybodyand re-emphasize things again. ‘Focuson this. Take a step back. Slow itdown.’”

Ebel tells his athletes that the ulti-mate target is to run the drills as fast asthey can, but the only way they’regoing to get there is by learning tomove intuitively. “The emphasis is

30 ◆ T&C M A Y / J U N E 2 0 0 4 ◆ A T H L E T I C B I D . C O M

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◆ O P T I M U M P E R F O R M A N C E ◆

Competitive Reactives

eff Connors, MSCC, Assistant Athletic Directorfor Strength and Conditioning at the Universityof North Carolina, has a whole host of drills he

calls competitive reactives, where he pits one athleteagainst another. One plays defense, the otheroffense, as they run through various drills that pushtheir limits of agility, quickness, and speed.

In one he calls the Cut-Back Drill, he sets threecones in a triangle, each 12 yards apart with twocones along a scoring line. A defender starts at oneof the two cones on that line, while an offensive play-er starts at the third cone. The offensive player triesto cross the scoring line without being tagged. Tomake things more difficult, Connors will sometimestie the defensive player’s arms at the elbows to keepthem down so that he has to bring his feet to theoffensive player.

Another, called the Chase Drill, starts with a sim-ilar configuration, but Connors adds a seconddefender, about three yards behind the offensiveplayer. “The offensive player has to avoid both the

player from behind and the player in front,” he says.“The defender in front is going to adjust not only tothe offensive player but also to the defensive playerin the back. They have to work together, so that if theplayer in the back moves slightly to one side or theother, the first defender will try to shade the otherdirection. Meanwhile, the offensive player has towatch them both.”

A variation of this, called the Funnel Drill, involvestwo offensive players and one defender. But it has theadded element that the field narrows to only about sixto eight yards in width as it approaches the goal line.“I’ll have a receiver come down the funnel with hishands behind his back and try to mirror off thedefender while a running back comes behind him, likea perimeter running play,” Connors says. “The run-ning back has to try to score without being tagged,using the receiver as a shield. In this drill, the defend-er can use his hands to some extent. But it’s just amovement drill. We’re not tackling anybody or evenreaching and grabbing them, we’re just tagging.”

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always on feeling it,” he says. “I tellthem, ‘Don’t think about what you’redoing. Feel what you’re doing. I don’twant you staring down at that ladder. Iwant you feeling that foot speed—feelthe rhythm, feel the balance, feel thecontrol. Then, find that border rightwhere you’re about to get out of con-trol and live on that edge.’”

Dietz also analyzes what his ath-letes can do to become faster. “Forexample, some kids will take impropersteps,” he says. “ Instead of making ita two-step change of direction, they’lltake three steps. That’s what I’m look-ing for and trying to eliminate.”

Then Dietz takes it one step fur-ther. “I’ll videotape them doing thedrills so that I can show them whatthey’re doing versus what they thinkthey’re doing,” he says. “For example,when you accelerate, you have to keepyour feet close to the ground and havea forward body lean. These are thethings we’re looking at and pointing

out to them on the video.”There are two schools of thought

about just how important perfect formis when performing these types ofdrills. For some coaches, acceptingimperfect form means less efficientmovements and an increased chance ofinjuries. “I don’t think there’s anyplace to accept improper technique,whether it’s in the weightroom or onthe field,” says Connors. “If you wantathletes to be productive, technique isgoing to be very important. If you’rewilling to compromise on technique,they’re going to suffer.”

Ebel agrees, saying, “I place a bigemphasis on perfecting technique. Ifirmly believe that the more perfecttheir technique, the more efficient theirmovement patterns, and the less effortthey have to apply. As they’re able toapply less effort, I’m able to make thatdrill harder and harder, which is whereyou see results.”

Other coaches will accept near-

perfect form because they believe thatmaximum intensity will yield greaterresults. “Some people are too con-cerned with making sure the kids haveperfect form and doing everything justso,” says Dietz. “The result is that thekids don’t run hard. They’re more wor-ried about doing the drill correctly thanabout the drill being done with asmuch intensity as possible.

“In sports, there’s nothing that’sdone the same way each time,” he con-tinues. “Every time you kick a soccerball you’re in a different position—theball’s not coming at the same angle,you’re not moving at the same speed,the defender isn’t in the same place. So,I don’t think you should be such astickler and make sure that everything’sthe same every time. Once they get theform down, it’s more important to getsome intensity out of them. They’ll getto the point where they’re running itefficiently, because their performancein the drill will be better.”

A T H L E T I C B I D . C O M ◆ T&C M A Y / J U N E 2 0 0 4 ◆ 33

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Page 36: Training & Conditioning 14.4

It was not long ago that basketball coaches would notdream of "ruining their players’ shots" by lifting weights.Fortunately, this and many other similar myths have been dis-pelled as coaches and players have become more educatedabout strength training's benefits. Strength training for basket-ball players is more important than ever before. As athletesbecome bigger, faster and stronger, physical training becomesless of an extra and more of a necessity. This evolution is evi-dent when you look at the players and teams that dominatemodern day basketball. Even though basketball is considered a"non-contact sport", players take as much abuse as some "con-tact sports". To stay competitive players must be able to sustaina high level of performance in an ever-increasing physicalgame. Athletes that participate in a supervised strength programprimarily see changes like increased athletic performance anddurability, but the benefits are not limited to physical. Animprovement in self-confidence is also a common occurrence.Coaches who wish to dominate in all aspects of the game ofbasketball must incorporate strength training to have a trulycomplete basketball program.

Not all programs are created equal. There are three compo-nents to a good strength program for basketball. The first is theappropriate exercise prescription. Like a physician's prescription,the strength program must be appropriate for its target audi-ence. The second component of a sound program is inclusion ofthe appropriate types of exercises. Exercises should be chosento train athletes for the specific demands placed upon their bod-ies during practice and games. Injuries are always a major con-cern for athletes and coaches, which is why injury prevention isthe final component.

In strength and conditioning, the exercise prescriptionincludes the number of sets, repetitions, and weights for eachexercise, the recovery times between sets, and the frequency,intensity, and duration of the workouts. Because of thedemands placed on the athlete by practice sessions and games,the strength program should be intense, short and infrequent.On most strength exercises athletes should try to reach momen-tary muscle failure, in other words, the point at which they canno longer move the weight. This is the type of intensity that willbring about positive changes. Short workouts are one hour orless. Sessions that last longer than one hour will have little ben-efit and may even contribute to overtraining the athletes. Lastlythe workouts should be infrequent. This is accomplished byusing a total body program done two or at most three times perseven-day period. This will allow ample recovery between work-outs so that a high level of intensity can be maintained fromone workout to the next.

Basketball involves repeated bouts of high intensity jumpsand sprints. Type IIB (fast twitch) muscle fibers are primarilyresponsible for these explosive movements. At the same timethe anaerobic (short term) energy system provides most of thepower supply. To prepare for this use a multiple set approachwith a heavy resistance. A resistance that can only be lifted forthree to eight repetitions will bring about the best results. Formost exercises a weight of 70% RM or higher should be used.Using a heavy resistance in this repetition range will stimulatethe Type IIB, fast twitch, muscle fibers. There will always besome exceptions such as certain isolation exercises and injury

prevention exercises. Recovery times should allow adequaterecovery of ATP to perform subsequent sets with the sameintensity. Depending upon the exercise, recovery times canrange anywhere from 90 seconds up to three minutes or longer. A basketball strength program should include exercises thattrain all major muscle groups with special emphasis on thosemuscles used in specific basketball movements. Compound,closed-chain movements should be done to strengthen the lowerbody. This can include Leg Presses, Squats, Deadlifts and SplitSquats or Lunges. The major focus of the strength programshould be on the lower body, since it performs most of thebody's movements. However, the upper body training cannot beleft out of the program. The upper body should be trained usingcompound movements like Chest Presses, Shoulder Presses, LatRows, Pull Ups, and Pulldowns. Additional exercises including,hip flexion, calf raises and shoulder raises can compliment thecompound movements. These more traditional types of exercis-es should make up the bulk of the program.

There are some additional exercises that should be includedto train explosive type movements. Olympic lifts can be a greathelp in getting athletes to develop power movement patterns.The two Olympic lifts, the Clean and Jerk and the Power Snatch,are relatively difficult and time consuming to learn. Therefore,variations of these movements, which are much easier to learn,can be incorporated. Exercises like power cleans, push presses,high pulls and push jerks will help to develop explosiveness aswell as movement patterns that simulate explosive motions.These exercises can be done using a standard Olympic bar or apiece of strength equipment that mimics the same actions.These Olympic style exercises should not be done to the point offailure, as this would compromise the ability to perform themovements at a high rate of speed. Instead, the focus should beon a quick, explosive movement with a lighter weight.

Although it is difficult to determine how much you can pre-vent or lessen the severity of injuries, there is no doubt that astrength program has an important role in injury prevention.When trying to reduce the occurrence of injuries, the first thingto check is the muscular balance of the players. Any imbalancecan contribute directly or indirectly to an injury. There are manytypes of muscular imbalances to be aware of. A differencebetween opposing muscle groups (the quadriceps and ham-strings), between two sides of the body, or between the upperand lower halves of the body should all be addressed. Timeshould be spent assessing each athlete’s overall balance todetermine what changes need to be done to their individual pro-grams. To improve muscular balance between opposing musclegroups, make sure that the program contains exercises for both.A program that has five pushing exercises for the upper bodyand only one pulling exercise does not make sense. For bettermuscle balance between the two halves of the body, freeweights and/or machines that allow independent movementsbetween limbs can help. This will ensure that the non-dominateside is forced to move as much resistance as the other side.Lastly, make athletes perform exercises for the upper and lowerbody. Resistance training for many young athletes immediatelyconjures up images of lifting weights for the upper body.Placing emphasis on the lower body, while still training theupper body, will produce the best overall effect.

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A T H L E T I C B I D . C O M ◆ T&C M A Y / J U N E 2 0 0 4 ◆ 37

◆ M A N A G E M E N T ◆

ew would argue that athletictrainers work too little.Balancing all our responsibili-ties is very challenging, andtime management is a strugglefor most of us at one point oranother.

Too often, there’s not enough timeto do everything we have to do as wellas we would like. In the end, toughchoices have to be made: Some tasksare completed, others pushed back, and

some are never really finished. Our athletes, coaches, administra-

tors, co-workers, parents, and physi-cians all expect us to accomplish cer-tain things in a certain time period.Many of these expectations are non-negotiable—they are simply part of thejob. Evaluating, treating, rehabilitat-ing, keeping records, communicating,and covering practices and games areall daily duties of the athletic trainer.Many of us also add teaching responsi-bilities, research activities, and com-mittee obligations to this list.

Fitting each of these duties into agiven day is like working a big jigsawpuzzle. How difficult we perceive thepuzzle to be directly influences howsuccessful we will be in satisfying allof our obligations. When we perceiveour list of tasks to be manageable, wetend to get everything done in a timelymanner. But when faced with a seem-ingly overwhelming list of chores andresponsibilities, some important tasksare neglected in favor of the mosturgent ones.

However, the jigsaw puzzle doesn’tneed to be as complicated as it firstappears. Through effective scheduling,

athletic training room management,communication, task delegation, andpolicy development, athletic trainerscan fit those pieces together each andevery day.

PLANNING AHEAD

Planning and scheduling are the firststeps to effective time management.Whether you work with a few selectsports or a large number of teams, pro-viding coverage and completing yourother duties can create conflicts. That’swhy it’s important, before the season,to compile a master schedule that listsevents on the horizon.

A master schedule allows the ath-letic trainer to identify conflicts or othertrouble spots and plan accordingly. Forexample, do you find one or more dayswith multiple events occurring simulta-neously? Will an afternoon meetingconflict with another obligation?

In my experience, situations thatsurprise me tend to be the most disrup-tive. Events that seem to appear out ofnowhere often force me to drop every-thing in order to adequately deal withwhatever is happening. Then, with myattention focused on the latest crisis, I

Race Against Time For many athletic trainers,

every day feels like a race

against time. But it doesn’t

have to be that way. This

author suggests strategies

for afternoon crunch time,

scheduling, and rethinking

your duties.

BY JOHN REYNOLDS

FJohn Reynolds, MS, ATC, is an AthleticTrainer and Teacher at George C. MarshallHigh School in Fairfax County, Va. He isalso a member of the writing team for theNATA’s Appropriate Medical Care forSecondary School Age Athletes Task Force.

Illus

tratio

ns: ©

Chr

is M

urph

y

Page 40: Training & Conditioning 14.4

slip further behind on the more rou-tine, but essential, aspects of myjob.

Proactive planning helps usto prepare for crunch time anddifficult situations. When wedon’t plan, we are forced toreact to the events before us,creating a situation that oftencauses stress and anxiety. Ofcourse, we can’t predict thefuture and there will always besurprises. But it is better to pre-pare for situations you can predict.

These principles also applywhere multiple athletic trainers worktogether. Having more than one athlet-ic trainer on staff to share responsibili-ties can be tremendously helpful, butscheduling and planning become evenmore critical. The key is to make timefor communicating and scheduling.Each staff athletic trainer should par-ticipate in creating the master scheduleand take time to evaluate it for con-flicts. The group as a whole can thenmake arrangements in the event of a

conflict or an absence to ensureresponsibilities are fulfilled.

In our athletic training room,we use a dry-erase wall calendarthat we fill in at the beginning ofeach month with both scheduledgames and other commitments,including days when any staffmember will be out of the office.We identify any conflicts anddecide who will cover which

evening activities. We don’talways get everything arranged at

that time, so we frequently go backand re-evaluate the calendar, which isespecially critical when weather forcesthe rescheduling of events.

Always having a master scheduleallows me to determine the feasibilityof any long-range projects that arise.For example, before I agreed to writethis article, I identified periods of timeduring the school day as well as afterschool to work on it.

Having a schedule won’t help,however, if you don’t look at it on aregular basis. The idea is to see trouble

38 ◆ T&C M A Y / J U N E 2 0 0 4 ◆ A T H L E T I C B I D . C O M

◆ M A N A G E M E N T ◆

Having a schedule won’thelp if you don’t look at it ona regular basis. The idea is

to see trouble spots ahead oftime so you and your staff

can plan accordingly.

NATA Booth No. 200 Request No. 28

Page 41: Training & Conditioning 14.4

Request No. 29

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40 ◆ T&C M A Y / J U N E 2 0 0 4 ◆ A T H L E T I C B I D . C O M

◆ M A N A G E M E N T ◆

spots ahead of time so you and yourstaff can plan accordingly, avoidingsurprises. By acting in a proactivemanner and communicating with yourcolleagues in advance, you’ll recog-nize more potential conflicts and findyourself reacting less often to situa-tions that could have been addressedearly on.

AFTERNOON STRATEGIES

Imagine a typical afternoon in the ath-letic training room. Several teams willbegin practice within the hour and youhave a line of athletes waiting for treat-ment. How many of us, when facedwith this situation, feel pressured toensure each individual makes it topractice on time?

Afternoons will always be crunchtime. That reality is hard to avoid. Tomake them manageable, however, it’simportant to look at the options avail-able to us.

One time-management strategyinvolves scheduling when athletesreport for treatment. Athletes generallyreport just before their practice orgame, and arrivals are staggered overseveral hours so the athletic trainersare less likely to be overwhelmed atany one time. While there is logic tothis arrangement, in my experience,time ends up being wasted rather thansaved.

With this plan, athletic trainers aretied up for several hours as the athletesfrom individual teams graduallyreport. The low-intensity activity in theathletic training room slows down theflow of athletes and encourages themto lounge around and socialize.

A different approach is to ask allathletes, regardless of when their prac-tice or game begins, to report at thesame time. In this scenario, all athletesarrive at once and the athletic trainerevaluates and treats everyone together.Yes, the athletic trainer will beextremely busy for a period of time,but the total time is less than in the firstplan. The benefit to the athletic traineris additional time devoted to adminis-trative duties, communicating withcoaches, parents, or physicians, or

even attending to other responsibilitiesoutside of the athletic training room.

Will athletes complain that theyhave to wait in line to be seen? Theymight, but if you make this system thenorm, they will learn and adapt. If atrip to the doctor or dentist officeinvolves waiting a few minutes, whyshouldn’t a trip to the athletic trainingroom? Explain to the next athlete inline that he or she needs to wait aminute or two while you finish yourdocumentation on the previous patient,or even take a few seconds to catchyour breath. In my experience, mostathletes will wait patiently if theyunderstand the process. Once the ath-letes realize they need to arrive fortreatments a few minutes earlier, youwill find yourself less frazzled and bet-ter prepared to take care of otherresponsibilities.

A SYSTEM FOR COMMUNICATING

Communicating with others is a keypart of our job, but also a time-con-suming one. For example, when thereis a change in an athlete’s participationstatus that you need to discuss with thecoach, how much time do you spendtrying to track down that coach duringpractice? We can spend a considerableamount of time walking from one fieldto the next, looking for a particularcoach. All too often, we can’t find thecoach, or our services are suddenlyneeded elsewhere. Worst of all, theimportant information you set out todeliver never gets shared.

With an understanding that goodcommunication between athletic train-ers and the athletes, coaches, parents,and physicians is an essential compo-nent of quality athletic health care,how can athletic trainers facilitategood communication in a time-effi-cient manner?

My best advice here is to develop areally good form for sharing informa-tion with others. This form should beshort and designed to be completedquickly. Some of these forms containfields an athletic trainer checks off orhighlights indicating what the athletedid that day. There may also be an areato indicate any participation recom-mendations or limitations and a spacefor the athletic trainer to record a briefnote. We use a computer-based recordkeeping software package that allowsthe ATC to print copies of an individ-ual’s injury report, which is much fasterthan writing a note by hand. When theathletes leave the athletic trainingroom, they deliver this form to theircoach or take it home to their parents.

A word of caution: This form isnot intended to replace a more perma-nent record-keeping system. Instead,the form is designed to help the athlet-ic trainer quickly and effectively com-municate with athletes, coaches, andparents.

A second word of caution: If youfeel in a particular situation that verbalcommunication is needed, do not letthe form do the talking. I believe verystrongly that communication is one of

When there is a change in an athlete’s

participation status thatyou need to discuss with the coach, how

much time do you spendtrying to track down thatcoach during practice?

Page 43: Training & Conditioning 14.4

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Page 44: Training & Conditioning 14.4

42 ◆ T&C M A Y / J U N E 2 0 0 4 ◆ A T H L E T I C B I D . C O M

◆ M A N A G E M E N T ◆

our top priorities. If a message needs tobe delivered to a coach or parent ver-bally, make time for it.

This idea also works well whencommunicating with physicians. Whenan athlete visits his or her doctor, whattype of communication do you expectto receive back? Why not develop areferral form to facilitate dialogue withyour area physicians? This form couldinclude a brief checklist highlightingthe results of your evaluation, the treat-ments performed, and a space to writenotes. The form could also includespace for the physician to indicate hisor her diagnosis, any recommendationsfor participation, and a checklist tonote specific treatments or rehabilita-tion exercises.

The biggest stumbling block withthese forms is making the time todevelop and use them. Too many of ushave good intentions, develop somesort of form or some type of policy, yetin the end, never use or enforce them.If you get in the habit of providing the

form to each individual, it becomesroutine. The key is making it short,easy to complete, and informative.

RETHINKING YOUR DUTIES

As I mentioned at the start of this arti-cle, evaluating, treating, rehab, recordkeeping, communicating, and coveringpractices and games are all non-nego-tiable duties of the athletic trainer. Orare they? When an athletic trainer hasmore tasks in the day than there is timeto do them, there may be no choice butto re-examine those tasks and figureout how some can be restructured.

Start by thinking about who youcan turn to for help. In addition to theathletic trainer, who else within theathletics program is responsible forensuring the safety of the athletes?Though it is not their main job, coach-es and athletic administrators shouldshare the responsibility of student-ath-lete health with you. No, they shouldnot evaluate or treat athletes. But thereare some duties they can take on, both

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44 ◆ T&C M A Y / J U N E 2 0 0 4 ◆ A T H L E T I C B I D . C O M

◆ M A N A G E M E N T ◆

large and small, to ease your load. For example, many athletic trainers spend a lot of time

dealing with hydration. Not only are athletic trainers expectedto deliver water, but they are also asked to fill, store, and cleancoolers and water bottles. Why is this the responsibility of ath-letic trainers? Water coolers and bottles can be assigned toeach team at the beginning of the season. Coaches are thenresponsible for filling and maintaining the coolers and bottlesthroughout the season. Once the season is complete, thesematerials are returned to the athletic trainers for distribution to

other teams during the following season. With this plan, thecoaches fulfill part of their obligation to provide a safe prac-tice environment, and the time-consuming task of managingwater is removed from the athletic trainers’ to-do list.

Practice and game coverage is another time-consumingtask. Have you ever counted the hours you spend watchingpractices and games? Have you ever counted the times you areactually needed on the scene? Can athletic trainers better man-age the amount of time they spend fulfilling this very time-consuming task?

Certainly, athletic trainers have the necessary skills tomanage a wide variety of practice injury situations. However,the athletic trainer doesn’t necessarily need to be the one toprovide the initial treatment and first aid when something hap-pens at practice. With proper first-aid training and a detailedemergency plan, coaches are able to provide first-responsecare for most minor injuries that happen when their team prac-tices. When an injury occurs and the athletic trainer is notavailable, the coach provides the initial treatment, notifies theathletic trainer, and requires the injured athlete to report to theathletic training room as soon as possible.

To aid coaches in their role as first aid providers, the ath-letic trainer can provide fully stocked first-aid kits for coach-es to bring to practices and games. Athletic trainers are thenfreed from spending idle time at practice and can concentrateon using their specialized skills to provide comprehensiverehabilitation programs and tend to administrative duties.

Some schools will insist on game coverage by the athlet-ic trainer, but this, too, can be lessened. The key is developinga coverage policy. A coverage policy dictates which eventsreceive athletic trainer coverage, based on injury exposure andseverity data. Athletic trainers can evaluate the records andcalculate the injury exposure rate for each sport during a givenseason. Sports with a greater incidence of injury shouldreceive coverage priority. In addition, injury severity data canbe calculated based on the amount of practice and game timethat injured individuals miss. Sports with more moderate and

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severe injuries should receive coveragepriority.

Through this analysis, you mayfind that athletes in some sports sufferfew injuries, and those injuries that dooccur tend to be minor. The questionthen, is this: Do these sports requireathletic training coverage or, based onthe injuries that do occur, is first-aidcoverage sufficient? If the latter is thecase, coaches could be asked to pro-vide the necessary first aid in theabsence of the athletic trainer.

There are some duties, however,that should not be skimped on. Forexample, record keeping is an impor-tant task frequently pushed aside whenwe feel burdened. In our haste toaccommodate everyone, we delayrecording treatments performed orchoose not to update an individual’srecord because it will take one minutetoo many. Record keeping can be bor-ing and monotonous, a perfect oppor-tunity to lighten the load, especiallywhen several individuals are waiting to

be seen. But record keeping is quitepossibly the most important aspect ofour job. Record keeping is the onlymeans for demonstrating what we doon a daily basis—something than canprotect us in a lawsuit and is evidenceof the valuable services we provide.

After thinking about which dutiesyou can give up and which you can’t,be sure to speak with your athleticdirector (or other supervisor) aboutyour ideas. Developing a coverage pol-icy is not something an athletic trainercan or should do independently. Itrequires the assistance and support ofthe athletic administration. You’ll alsoneed the administration’s support forthe small things: Asking coaches to beresponsible for their own water shouldbe a policy the athletic director imple-ments, not a suggestion from the ath-letic trainer alone.

Earn the support of the athleticadministration by effectively present-ing your ideas. Show your injury dataand ask that the athletic director workwith you to establish a coverage policythat satisfies everyone. Ask that yourathletic administrator support first aidinstruction for all coaches. Explain thatthis will allow you to focus on rehabil-itation and administrative duties whilemaintaining an appropriate level ofcare.

Athletic trainers, as a whole, have a“can do” attitude. Our willingness tohelp is one of the traits that got us intothis profession, but we can contributemore if we take our time seriously anddemonstrate to our co-workers that ourtime is valuable. Take control of thingsyou can, and work with your adminis-tration to create effective policies thathelp you use your time most effectively.

Finally, demonstrate your resultsby keeping coaches and administratorsin the loop. When an athlete gets backon the field sooner because you hadmore time for rehab with him, let thecoach know. When a coach handles aninjury situation well, let your athleticdirector know. And when your frownof stress turns into smiles for your stu-dent-athletes, you can pat yourself onthe back for figuring out the puzzle oftime management. ◆

46 ◆ T&C M A Y / J U N E 2 0 0 4 ◆ A T H L E T I C B I D . C O M

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n athletic trainer’s job isfocused on two things:preventing injuries andtreating injuries. But toooften, we think aboutthese things in isolation.

Recently, at The OhioState University, we triedto adapt some of our

injury treatment work to injury preven-tion. After seeing a rash of shoulderinjuries and back problems amongfootball players over the past few sea-sons, we chose to implement a prehabapproach. This entails having healthyplayers perform rehab-type exercises

targeting key areas with the hopes ofreducing injuries.

Every athletic trainer has lists ofexercises used to help players recoverfrom surgery and injury. At Ohio State,we figured that by employing theseexercises on uninjured players, wecould help avoid some of the injuriesthat were just waiting to happen.

With much cooperation and sup-port from our strength and condition-ing coaches and head football coach,we implemented our prehab plan dur-ing the 2003 preseason football camp.Although it is still too soon to evaluatethe overall effectiveness of the pro-gram, we are planning to continue it

for the 2004 season in the belief that itwill reduce the incidence and severityof injuries.

THE THEORY

Most players and coaches understandthe idea that strength and conditioningnot only helps performance, but alsoreduces the risk of injury. A strongerplayer is less likely to get hurt than aweaker one, so it’s common practicefor players to perform strengtheningexercises that target specific areas, suchas the neck and trunk musculature.

This is especially important inareas where there may be an underly-ing weakness. In some cases, this mayresult from a pre-existing condition orprevious injury. In other cases, a weak-ness may develop from imbalances

A T H L E T I C B I D . C O M ◆ T&C M A Y / J U N E 2 0 0 4 ◆ 49

◆ T R E A T I N G T H E A T H L E T E ◆

From BACKto FRONT

From BACKto FRONT

At The Ohio State University, athletic trainers are attempting to prevent injuries before they start through a carefully designed prehab program.

BY DOUG CALLAND

ADoug Calland, MS, ATC/L, is the HeadAthletic Trainer for Football at The OhioState University.

© Jim Judkis

Author Doug Calland works with football players ondeveloping the small intrinsic muscles in the back.

Page 52: Training & Conditioning 14.4

created when strengthening one area more than another.For example, some of our players were developing large

extrinsic musculature in their shoulders (pecs, lats, and delts)and not maintaining the intrinsic muscle strength in the rotatorcuff that helps to stabilize the joint. Thus, they developed animbalance between the extrinsic and intrinsic muscles, leavingthemselves more vulnerable to injury.

The problem with strengthening the intrinsic rotator cuffmuscles is that many players view the exercises as dull andboring. The rotator cuff is best strengthened by performinghigh repetitions of internal and external rotation movementswith very light weights. Many football players think that work-ing out with two-pound dumbbells is a waste of time, but thereality is that more weight is not always better. As soon assomeone grabs a weight that is too heavy, which may be aslight as five pounds, they’re no longer exercising the intrinsicmuscles in the rotator cuff. Players who undergo reconstruc-tive shoulder surgery quickly learn this concept as part of theirrehabilitation.

Instead of limiting these intrinsic-muscle exercises torehab programs, we work them into the players’ standardstrength and conditioning program. Ideally, these additionalexercises will prevent the imbalance, and thus reduce thechance of injury.

As athletic trainers, it’s fairly obvious to us when playersare sustaining an increasing number of injuries to a specificregion. When this occurs, we evaluate potential mechanismsand causes to explain the increase. Sometimes this is throughcollegial discussions with other athletic trainers to determine ifthey are experiencing the same increases that we are. It canalso be helpful to look to other sports medical professionals,some of whom may be involved in other sports.

As we assessed our players’ injury histories to identify otherat-risk areas, we quickly zeroed in on the lower back, which isprone to the same muscle-imbalance issues as the shoulder.Anyone who has ever dealt with a back spasm can tell you it’sthe deep postural muscles that are affected. These small, deepmuscles, once locked in spasm, can immobilize even the tough-est athlete. So we developed a second program that emphasizesthe development of the small intrinsic muscles in the back andaddresses some common flexibility issues as well.

COACHES ON BOARD

As with most injury prevention efforts, developing a prehabprogram goes well beyond the athletic training room. A prehabprogram only works when it has the full support of both thehead coach and the strength and conditioning coaches. Withouttheir full support, it is highly unlikely that the players will puttheir complete effort into the program.

Most coaches will respond well, however, if you canshow them a need for this type of program by explaining howit will address problem areas that may be keeping playerssidelined. Getting input from the coach regarding his or herareas of concern is an additional way to gain the acceptanceof the program.

Fortunately, our head football coach, Jim Tressel, was

50 ◆ T&C M A Y / J U N E 2 0 0 4 ◆ A T H L E T I C B I D . C O M

◆ T R E A T I N G T H E A T H L E T E ◆

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A T H L E T I C B I D . C O M ◆ T&C M A Y / J U N E 2 0 0 4 ◆ 51

◆ T R E A T I N G T H E A T H L E T E ◆

instantly sold on the idea of prehab. Heeven suggested two additional areasthat he wanted to see us address in theprehab program: hamstring muscula-ture and the ankle-joint complex.

The strength and conditioningcoach’s support is just as crucial as thehead coach’s support. After all, thestrength and conditioning coach willbe the one devising workout plans andworking with the players in the weight-room. The prehab program is designedto supplement the performance im-provement program, not replace it, sothe strength and conditioning coachwill need to decide how to best fit theprehab exercises into his or her stan-dard workout schedule.

Allan Johnson, our strength andconditioning coach for football, hasbeen very supportive of the prehabprogram from the moment we firstmentioned it to him. He had evenadded rotator cuff band work to theplayers’ programs well before the 2003season.

MAKING IT ALL WORK

When we introduced our prehab pro-gram to the players during the 2003 pre-season summer camp, we dividedeveryone into two groups, freshmen andreturning players. We then split each ofthose groups into smaller units of six toeight players, usually by position.

The sessions with the new playerswere generally more straightforward,since these athletes faced a wide rangeof new learning experiences of whichthe prehab program was one compo-nent. The returning players took a littlemore convincing, since this programvaried from what they were used to. Inaddition, the benefits were harder forthem to see and quantify than those oftheir other strength work. However,once the returning players felt theeffects of the prehab exercises, theyrealized the importance of continuingthe program and its potential todecrease their injury risk.

The program consisted of four 15-minute sessions, one on each of thefour identified areas: the shoulders,back, hamstrings, and ankles. The ses-sions were run concurrently by either

an athletic trainer or strength and con-ditioning coach so that all four“schools” were completed within atotal of one hour. The school instructorworked with the players on how to dothe prescribed exercises and explainedwhy we were having them do theseexercises. It was important to keep thegroups relatively small because wewanted to be able to provide each play-er with individual attention in order to

make sure he could perform the exer-cises correctly and understand exactlywhat we wanted to accomplish.

We repeated these sessions twomore times during camp to make surethat players were performing the exer-cises correctly. We were helped by newNCAA preseason practice rules thatprohibit teams from holding two-a-daysessions on consecutive days, thus pro-viding some ready-made time for the

FOCUS: scapular control and upper-back development, good form, and intrinsic shoulder muscle groups.

MAIN POINTS:• Stress symmetry between opposite muscle groups and planes.• Use rotator cuff strength and function exercises, emphasizing light

resistance.• Include shoulder and upper-back flexibility component.• Teach players awareness of joint position during exercises.• Emphasize squeezing the scapular muscles during any big muscle

group work and controlling the weight during dumbbell exercises.

EXERCISES:• Corner stretch forward and backward.• Internal/external rotation at 0 and 90 degrees (3 x 15 each side with

light resistance).• Partner-assisted rhythmic stabilization (5 x 20 seconds each side).• Full can (3 x 15).• Prone reverse flys with light weight (3 x 15).

Table One: Shoulder School

FOCUS: good form, targeting intrinsic muscle groups in the back.

MAIN POINTS:• Increase flexibility to maintain lumbar curve and proper SI joint and hip

mobility.• Stabilize spine using deep intrinsic muscles.• Promote the relationship between hip flexors, hamstrings, and deep,

lower abdominal strength for good back health.• Strengthen muscles with ball stability exercises, core strength

development, and neutral spine positions.• Stress good posture and core control with all lifts by keeping the belly

button toward the spine and squeezing the buttocks.• Emphasize keeping the butt out during squats.

EXERCISES:• Single, straight leg v-sit (with adduction).• Ball stability exercises (bounce, opposite arm & leg, bridge, superman).• Start/stop urine flow for recruitment of multifidii and transverse

abdominus.• Exercise ball squeeze and raise.

Table Two: Back School

Page 54: Training & Conditioning 14.4

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◆ T R E A T I N G T H E A T H L E T E ◆

additional prehab sessions. While thedefense worked with their coaches, wewould have the offensive playerscome in for prehab sessions. Then wewould bring the defense in for prehabsessions while the offense went intomeetings. With a year’s experienceunder our belts, we’re hoping we cango a little more in depth on certainexercises for the returning players thisseason while retaining the same basicstructure as last year for incomingplayers.

Once the players were instructedin the details of the prehab program, itbecame the strength and conditioningcoach’s responsibility to work it intothe day-to-day workouts. This wasfacilitated by selecting exercises thatcould easily fit into what the playerswere already doing or by emphasizingcertain aspects of those exercises. Thisalso reduced the possibility of over-loading the athletes with increased vol-ume and potentially exacerbatingchronic injuries.

For example, much of our prehabshoulder work requires multiple repswith low weights. These can be com-pleted during the players’ leg days inbetween their other exercises. Workingthe intrinsic muscles of the backrequired few additional exercises, butrather players made sure these muscleswere worked during the lifts they werealready performing.

Players who had a history ofinjury in any of the four areas skippedthe respective school and continuedwith the rehabilitation program thatwas previously designed. These ath-letes did participate in the otherschools.

SCHOOL WORK

Shoulder school: The main concern indeveloping the shoulder school waskeeping a good balance between theintrinsic and extrinsic muscles. Weaddress this with several rotator cuffexercises with light resistance and mul-tiple repetitions. (Table One on page 51describes the shoulder school.)

The scapular muscles also requireattention to keep the shoulder in bal-ance. These muscles provide symmetryto the shoulder and take stress off theanterior shoulder. Many athletes workthe anterior shoulder and chest, butneglect these important stabilizingmuscles.

Shoulder flexibility is a very im-portant part of our prehab program, anddemonstrating proper stretching of theshoulder areas is a key component ofthe shoulder school. We also stress tothe players the importance of squeezingthe back of their shoulders togetherwhen doing other exercises, such as latpull-downs. The combination of rotatorcuff strength and scapular stabilizationand flexibility should help reduceinjuries to the shoulder area.

Back school: Core work is noth-ing new for most athletes, but the backschool is designed to help playersdevelop the smaller muscles that maylock into spasm. For the back, wetalked to the players extensively aboutworking the intrinsic muscles duringtheir existing strength work by clench-ing their glutes and focusing on keep-

FOCUS: flexibility, functional strength, and maintenance of properquad/ham ratio.

MAIN POINTS:• Increase general flexibility, including hip flexors, hamstrings, quads,

and groin.• Stress proper in-season maintenance (warmup, cooldown, rest,

and recovery).• Stress flexibility after lower leg days, heavy conditioning days,

and to combat fatigue.

EXERCISES:• Dumbbell straight legs.• Seated hamstring machine.• Standing cuff weight bands with speed component (minimal during

preseason camp).• Partner stretches (including 90/90 stretch).

Table Three: Hamstring School

FOCUS: strength, proprioception, and balance.

MAIN POINTS:• Use sport-specific balance exercises.• Employ isolated ankle strengthening.• Stress proper stretching techniques.• Make players adjust to new surfaces and frequent surface changes.• Schedule ankle exercises for end of sessions when players are

fatigued.

EXERCISES:• Way-band exercises.• One-legged ball catch.• Cup drills.• Eyes-closed exercises.• Heel cord and peroneal stretches.• Dot drills.• Heel walking/toe walking.

Table Four: Ankle School

Page 55: Training & Conditioning 14.4

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54 ◆ T&C M A Y / J U N E 2 0 0 4 ◆ A T H L E T I C B I D . C O M

◆ T R E A T I N G T H E A T H L E T E ◆

ing the belly button close to the spine. To help them under-stand this concept, we explained that it’s similar to using themuscles used to start and stop urine flow.

Another emphasis here is on the proper alignment of hipsand shoulders. Once the athletes understand and focus on theneutral spine position, almost any exercise can help build thesmall muscles in the back. We also use abdominal work andpelvic floor exercises along with exercise ball work toimprove stability as well as adding flexibility components.(Table Two on page 51 describes the back school.)

Hamstring school: Hamstring injuries are very frustrat-ing because they are very unforgiving. Once an athlete seemsto have recovered from this type of strain, it is not uncommonto either reinjure the same leg or stress the opposite side. Themain way to prevent this is by increasing both the strength andflexibility of the hamstrings in relation to the quadriceps.

To build strength, we vary hamstring workouts to includefast reps with lower weight in both seated and standing posi-tions. To make the most efficient use of the players’ time, westress flexibility on the days following heavy conditioningdays or lower leg days. Proper warmup, cooldown, and restare also stressed both in and out of the playing season.

Instituting a solid running program during off-seasontraining specifically for short and long sprint work and changeof direction also helps to reduce hamstring injuries. Weemphasize a proper daily warmup, which includes flexibility,football-related movements, and motion patterns. Workoutsare scheduled four times per week and broken into two seg-ments. Mondays and Thursdays are used for agility and posi-tion-specific drills. These include multiple-change-of-direc-tion drills with bags, cones, and similar devices. Tuesdays andFridays are focused on forward and lateral speed, speedmechanics, and plyometrics. The most important considera-tion is the ability to transfer skills from the conditioning pro-gram to the football field. (Table Three on page 52 describesthe hamstring school.)

Ankle school: Of the four schools, the ankle schoolrequires the greatest amount of dedicated work because itrelies heavily on balance and proprioception. We use sport-specific balance exercises, such as playing catch with a foot-ball while standing on one leg, as well as drills that requireathletes to adjust to frequent changes in surface. We like to usecup drills, where athletes pick up and place down cups whilestanding on one leg, and eyes-closed drills on foam rubberboxes, where athletes perform simple movements while stand-ing on a slightly unstable surface. Because athletes are mostsusceptible to ankle sprains when they’re fatigued, much ofour ankle work is done at the end of the workout so the play-ers can get a good sense of how their muscles and joints willwork when they’re tired. (Table Four on page 52 describes theankle school.)

Of course, none of these efforts will prevent all injuries.We know our players will continue to get hurt and that themain use for most rehabilitation exercises will be to help ath-letes return to play. But we believe an hour of prevention isbetter than months of rehab. ◆

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Page 57: Training & Conditioning 14.4

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Page 58: Training & Conditioning 14.4

New and RevolutionaryWay of ConditioningFootball Players

Imagine the following: You are aresponsible football coach running aquality program and you take yourpractices seriously. You go throughthe normal progression of sprints,drills, instruction, and scrimmages,requiring hard work and maximumeffort. Then, after running yourplayers for two hours during practice, you run them again forconditioning. Day after day, thisregimen takes its toll on the athletes' bodies.

There is a better way. Two yearsago, I came across a new productthat allows running in water. Itloads the lower body with moreresistance than ordinary running,but without the impact on joints.While running for conditioningmust be a part of any training program, it isn't the only way toget the job done.

The product is called the WingedWater Walker, and if you haveaccess to a swimming pool, youshould be using this device. I haveused it myself with large athletes,and I've had great success. Itdevelops speed by working thewhole leg, including the often-neg-lected hip flexors. It also works thecore and upper body, letting yourathletes achieve a superior fitnesslevel. And the Winged Water Walkerdoes all of this without wearing onthe joints the way wind sprints do.

The device looks somewhat like asmall snowshoe for each foot, withhinged wings on both sides. As the

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The Winged Water Walker is especial-ly helpful in training high-mileageathletes, like running backs and widereceivers. It's also great exercise foryour linemen—we all know how hardit can be to keep the big guys inshape to play hard for four quarters.Nothing can help get them there quitelike this unique water workout.

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Circle No. 115

BSN-JOBST, INC. BOOTH NO. 800

Strappal is a rigid strapping tape that provides extrastrong support. Constructed from viscose fabric com-bined with a hypoallergenic zinc oxide adhesive,

Strappal is the solution for providing efficient stabiliza-tion of joint structures. Offered in 1 1/2” and 2” sizes.

Circle No. 116

Jobst for Men gradient compression socks from BSNJobst deliver effective support, but look like a finemen’s dress sock. Jobst for Men is ideal for athletes onor off the field providing leg therapy that feels greatand helps manage pain and discomfort associatedwith moderate edema.

Circle No. 117

DM SYSTEMS, INC.BOOTH NO. 1111

The Cadlow™ Shoulder Stabilizer allows athletes tofully function at their sport without fear of shoulderpain or re-injury. Cadlow provides glenohumeral sta-bility while maintaining the athlete’s full range ofmotion (ROM). This stabilizer’s unique patented pullsystem strengthens the shoulder by providing graduat-ed resistance through the full ROM.“Prescriptionpads” are available to make it easier for physicians,physical therapists and athletic trainers to recommendCadlow to their patients and athletes.

Circle No. 118

AnkleTough® by DM Systems offers a system of pro-gressive resistance that can be customized to fit theneeds of athletes. Comprised of color-coded resistivetension straps in four strengths, the AnkleTough sys-tem can help prevent the recurrence of ankle injuriesby strengthening and conditioning the surroundingankle muscles and tendons.“Prescription pads” areavailable to make it easier for physicians, physical ther-apists and athletic trainers to recommend AnkleToughto their patients and athletes.

Circle No. 119

DYNATRONICS CORP. BOOTH NO. 100

Dynatronics’ taping tables are designed to meet thecontinuous demands of today’s athletic training room.Ruggedly constructed of the finest hardwoods andupholstery, they feature triple bolted legs for maximumstability. The Dynatronics taping tables can be customdesigned to fit your training room needs. In additionto custom tables, standard models are available withoptional shelves and cabinets.

Circle No. 120

DM SystemsBooth No. 1111

BSN-Jobst, Inc.Booth No. 800

DynatronicsBooth No. 100

BiofreezeBooth No. 215

BNA Modular ConceptsBooth No. 149

EXHIBITOR

60 ◆ T&C M A Y / J U N E 2 0 0 4 ◆ A T H L E T I C B I D . C O M

Training & Conditioning is pleased to present this preview of the 2004 NATA TradeShow to help you get ready for this year’s convention. We’ve collected important contactinformation about many of the show’s key exhibitors. There are also tickets to present tomany of the exhibitors that get you free items, the chance to win prizes, special discounts,etc. The information featured in the T&C Show Planner was collected by Training &Conditioning through mailings to companies planning to exhibit at the convention, phonecontact, and other correspondences.

Page 63: Training & Conditioning 14.4

PREVIEWFOOT MANAGEMENT, INC.

BOOTH NO. 709Replace your athletes’ existing shoe insole with a quali-ty footbed from Foot Management. The One Stop EVAis an ultra functional off-the-shelf multi-density inlay.Made of an EVA base material with a polyester coveredtop layer of softer, comfortable Poron™, it providesexcellent, long-lasting support. It can be modified byheating in a convection oven or used as is. Extremelycost effective as both a temporary or diagnostic orthot-ic device.

Circle No. 121

The newest product available from Foot Managementis the Static Calf Stretcher. Made from durable, weath-er-resistant materials, it’s designed to help relieve thepain of plantar fasciitis and to increase calf flexibility.Lightweight and portable, it’s perfect in any setting.Ideal for use with cleats of all types. No more slippingwhen trying to stretch out on the field or court. Use inthe home as well for maximum benefit.

Circle No. 122

GENERAL PHYSIOTHERAPY, INC.BOOTH NO. 449

Designed for the professional who requires both powerand portability, the G5®GBM™ is now equipped withan LCD display to show cycles per second and treat-ment time. The GBM provides smooth and powerfulpenetration of muscles and tissues at variable speeds.Solid state digital controls provide a speed range of 20to 55 cycles per second. The GBM massage headaccepts all Genuine G5 brand massage applicators.

Circle No. 123

GRASTON TECHNIQUEBOOTH NO. 246

The Graston Technique, an innovative form of instru-ment-assisted soft tissue mobilization, is designed todetect and resolve soft tissue injuries more completely.Performed by skillfully-trained ATCs, PTs, OTs, andDCs, the Technique is effective in helping injured ath-letes achieve higher levels of function and pain relief.The result is better resolution for soft tissue injuriesand a quicker return to normal activity.

Circle No. 124

KELLY KINETICSBOOTH NO. 1120

The Pivot Plate utilizes a patented Variable Offset Pivot(V.O.P.) system. To increase or decrease the neuromus-cular demand, the fulcrum can be placed at varying-moment arm lengths. The fulcrum can also be selec-tively placed in the best biomechanical position to tar-get select musculature for strengthening. Unlike tradi-tional balance boards, the Pivot Plate user is affixed tothe platform, which allows the patient to vary his orher center of gravity position for a range of resistancelevels.

Circle No. 125

The CryoThermal Massage Tool from Kelly Kineticsweighs 2-1/2 pounds. This soft grip, solid stainlesssteel tool allows the user to easily apply the appropriateamount of pressure, while delivering soothing heatand/or the cool sensation of cryo-therapy. Designedwith two removable massage heads, the tool allows formultiple massage techniques while reducing stress onthe clinician’s hands.

Circle No. 126

MEDZONE CORPORATIONBOOTH NO. 828

MedZone® provides a line of topical, OTC productsused for soft tissue injuries, joint pain, wound care,massage therapy, various skin conditions, and the lat-est product is an anti-chafing stick. Formulated andmanufactured by an FDA-approved lab, these productswere developed with the concept that when the toplayer of the skin—the epidermis—is not penetratedthen only that top layer is being affected. Most peopledo not have “skin pain” and therefore need a topicalagent that will work at the tissue level to consistentlyand positively aid in the recovery process.

Circle No. 127

OAKWORKS, INC. BOOTH NO. 1314

The Boss is a great treatment table designed specifical-ly for ATCs. Its lightweight design and protective carry-ing case help it travel easily from the athletic trainingroom to the sideline. The unique aluminum under-structure is tough enough to support a 600-lb. ULweight load rating and the sealed seams and remov-able field feet mean the Boss works rain or shine. Easyheight adjustments make the Boss the ergonomicanswer for every ATC.

Circle No. 128

Because the game isn’t played in the locker room, youneed the Oakworks Portable Taping Table. The onlyportable adjustable height table on the market, andweighing only 35 lbs., this table folds flat for easy stor-age and transportation. Features like a marine-gradeplastic top, adjustable height range of 32-42 inches, ULweight rating of 500 lbs., and durable carrying casewill maximize effectiveness for every ATC.

Circle No. 129

PREMIER SOFTWARE, INC.BOOTH NO. 208

The Web-based eSimtrak.NET injury tracking andtreatment records system provides access to yourtraining room records 24 hours a day from anywhere.This system offers the most advanced technology at anaffordable monthly access fee designed for low cost ofownership. Scanned documents and digital X-rays aresupported, bringing together the athletic training roomand physician. Users can enter an unlimited number ofathletes at no extra charge.

Circle No. 130

Foot ManagementBooth No. 709

General PhysiotherapyBooth No. 449

GrastonTechniqueBooth No. 246

MedZoneCorporation

Booth No. 828

PremierSoftwareBooth No. 208

OakworksBooth No. 1314

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PREVIEW

KellyKinetics

Booth No. 1120

Page 64: Training & Conditioning 14.4

EXHIBITORPREPAK PRODUCTS

BOOTH NO. 1025PrePak Products’ Web-Slide® Exercise Rail System is afixed-point exercise station designed to increase pro-ductivity for regular users of low-cost exercise equip-ment such as tubing, bands, and pulleys. It requiresjust 3’ of floor space and includes everything youneed—fixtures, exercise devices, instructional materi-als—to quickly and effectively train and monitor thosein need of rehab and fitness exercise programs.

Circle No. 131

PROTEAM BY HAUSMANNBOOTH NO. 1107

PROTEAM offers the athletic trainer a complete line ofall-laminate treatment furniture designed to enhancethe functional capacity and appearance of the athletictraining room. PROTEAM Modular Taping Stations areavailable in a wide variety of sizes and with manyoptions. Individual Taping units are furnished on allsides and can be easily re-positioned to fit your needsor space changes in the future. PROTEAM also offers awide selection of Treatment tables, Split-Leg tables,Cabinets and Stadium Lockers.

Circle No. 132

PROTEAM by Hausmann offers the athletic trainer acomplete line of all-laminate treatment furnituredesigned to enhance the functionality and appearanceof the athletic training room. The model A9068 SplitLeg Lift Table features: spacious full cabinet storage, anoptional air spring backrest, a weight capacity of 400lbs. and positive locking, padded leg rests that adjustup to 45°. PROTEAM offers a wide selection ofTreatment tables, Modular Taping Stations, Cabinetsand Stadium Lockers.

Circle No. 133

QUEST TECHNOLOGIES, INC.BOOTH NO. 1204

Exertional heat illnesses inhibit an athlete’s ability toperform at peak levels, threatens their safety, and canexpose an organization to unprecedented liabilities.Quest’s environmental monitors enable athletic train-ers, coaches and sports medicine researchers to obtaincomprehensive and accurate information in real-time,display and record correlated core temperature andheart rate, and provide real-time alerts and time histo-ry profiles of measured data that directly affect an ath-lete’s safety and performance.

Circle No. 134

SPORTS HEALTHBOOTH NO. 208

Sports Health offers a variety of rehabilitation prod-ucts used by athletic trainers everywhere. From every-day products like exercise balls, stability trainers,hot/cold packs, dumbbells, and ice bags to the moreextensive products like whirlpools, TENS, and stim

units, ultrasounds and massage therapy—SportsHealth has all the rehabilitation products you’re look-ing for.

Circle No. 135

BRACESAIRCAST, INC.

BOOTH NO. 707The AirHeel™ is specifically designed to relieve thepain associated with plantar fasciitis and Achilles ten-donitis through dynamic functional treatment. Witheach step, the Aircast AirHeel provides intermittentcompression through an aircell under the plantar archinteracting with an aircell surrounding the Achillestendon. The pulsating compression from these aircellshelps minimize swelling and discomfort, and promotesfast pain relief.

Circle No. 136

BIOSKINBOOTH NO. 322

The TriLok™ secures ankle motion without restrictingplantar-flexion or dorsi-flexion. With a patent-pendingsoft design, the TriLok is also compact enough to fitcomfortably in your shoe. Patented Bio Skin® materialalso provides optimal proprioceptive feedback. TheTriLok is used in clinics, on playing fields, and in gymsacross America. It is functional, comfortable, and effec-tive. It is the most effective and versatile brace toreplace taping.

Circle No. 137

Patellofemoral joint dysfunction and pain has a newtreatment. The patent pending Q Lok APT™(Adjustable Patella Traction) from Bioskin diminishespain, increases function, and achieves desired patellatracking. The Q Lok™ controls patella pressure in thetrochlear groove to increase joint surface area contact.In addition, the Q Lok allows adjustable medial patellatraction to loosen tight lateral connective tissue, pro-viding successful patellafemoral treatment whenlinked with an exercise-strengthening program.

Circle No. 138

BRACE INTERNATIONAL, INC.BOOTH NO. 436

The MAX™ is a major advancement in the design ofshoulder girdle support. The snug-fitting, lightweightmaterial allows for comfort with movement, yet at thesame time helps protect the glenohumeral joint fromsubluxations and dislocations. Its strap design systemallows many options for maximal stability where need-ed while giving the required range of motion.

Circle No. 139BraceInternational

Booth No. 436

QuestTechnologies

Booth No. 1204

SportsHealth

Booth No. 208

Aircast, Inc.Booth No. 707

EXHIBITOR

62 ◆ T&C M A Y / J U N E 2 0 0 4 ◆ A T H L E T I C B I D . C O M

BioSkinBooth No. 322

PrePakProducts

Booth No. 1025

PROTEAM byHausmannBooth No. 1107

Page 65: Training & Conditioning 14.4

PREVIEWMCDAVID SPORTS MEDICAL PRODUCTS

BOOTH NO. 1000The #188 Ultra Ankle is a professional quality hingedbrace designed to treat all ankle injuries includinghigh ankle sprains. Engineered to reduce the exces-sive inversion, eversion, and rotation that causesmost ankle injuries, Ultra Ankle incorporatesadvanced features that make it superior to otherhinged braces. Those features include the patentedLDC (Lock Down Cuff) Technology with a pivotingposterior cuff that helps reduce excessive rotaryforces. The thermal responsive molded pad systemprovides optimum comfort and fit. The adjustablequick-fit Lock Down Strap allows for quick applica-tion and removal.

Circle No. 140

McDavid Sports Medical Products offers the #195Ultralight Ankle Brace. This top quality product fea-tures a lightweight nylon/vinyl fabric with stirrupstraps that may be adjustable at any time during playwithout removing the shoe. These straps stimulate aprofessional taping technique that lends additionalsupport and protection for common injuries. Othersupport and comfort features include a padded lin-ing, notched front, elastic heel and tongue, and asewn in arch support.

Circle No. 141

MEDICAL SPECIALTIES, INC.BOOTH NO. 323

Med Spec introduces the Gripper™ Hinged KneeBrace for the treatment of MCL or LCL sprains. Theneoprene brace may also be used post operatively orduring sports to provide medial and lateral stabilityand to protect against hyperextension. The Skinloc™material inside the brace grips the proximal end ofthe gastrocnemius (calf) muscle to maintain a prop-er position on the knee and resist distal migration.

Circle No. 142

Med Spec has introduced the DynaTrack™ patellastabilizer for the treatment of patellofemoral dys-function. The easy to apply design features an inter-nal buttress with Skinloc™ material and an outerneoprene wrap that can be adjusted to provide theoptimum amount of dynamic pressure against thepatella. A large popliteal opening permits a highdegree of flexion with no discomfort. Each size fitseither the left or right knee.

Circle No. 143

PRO-TEC ATHLETICSBOOTH NO. 321

Iliotibial Band Syndrome, commonly referred asITBS, is a difficult injury to treat. Pro-Tec Athleticsdoes, however, have an answer. The Iliotibial BandWrap stabilizes the IT Band and reduces stress to thearea, alleviating symptoms of ITBS. Applied abovethe patella, it is designed with a compression pad that

provides direct compression on the Iliotibial Band.Circle No. 144

Unparalleled in comfort and effectiveness, the ShinSplints Compression Wrap by Pro-Tec Athletics alle-viates symptoms of medial and anterior shin splints.It includes a compression strip to provide targetedcompression. This helps prevent tearing of the softtissue away from the tibia. In addition, the ShinSplints Compression Wrap absorbs stress to the tibiaand helps stabilize the area. Its contoured designkeeps pressure off the calf area in cases of MedialTibial Stress Syndrome.

Circle No. 145

STROMGREN SUPPORTSBOOTH NO. 913

The Z175 Ankle System features patented double-layer breathable knit elastic for maximum compres-sion and conformity. Its ventilated design minimizesperspiration build-up. The Z175 also features web-bing control strips, a hinged foam tongue with fourmetal stays, two side panel stays, and 16 closelyspaced eyelets for localized support. It has a low pro-file, fits inside any shoe, and is lightweight andambidextrous.

Circle No. 146

The #345 SuperWrap from Stromgren Supports pro-vides maximum support of the ankle joint and stabi-lizes the heel and anterior area. The unique, dual-lay-ered design and color-coded strapping system pro-vides the best support available. Heel lock elasticfacilitates movement of the foot and provides com-fort over the Achilles tendon. It is available in black orwhite.

Circle No. 147

SWEDE-O, INC.BOOTH NO. 514

New Thermoskin Thermal Supports may be used forprevention, treatment, and rehabilitation. They areclinically proven to increase your subcutaneous tem-perature 2 - 3° F, making muscles, tendons, and liga-ments more elastic, reducing the risk of injury whenunder stress. Only Thermoskin has Trioxon liningthat allows air flow in and wicks moisture out forhours of continuously comfortable wear.

Circle No. 148

The Swede-O Tarsal Lok® combines the greater sup-port of a rigid brace with the superior comfort of alace-up brace. The upgraded Fortilene stabilizermaterial will actually form to the shape of your anklesimply from body heat. The low profile design fits inalmost any style of shoe, not just athletic shoes.Speed lacing system for easy application andremoval.

Circle No. 149

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PREVIEWMcDavid Sports

Booth No. 1000

Medical SpecialtiesBooth No. 323

Pro-TecAthletics

Booth No. 321

Stromgren SupportsBooth No. 913

Swede-O, Inc.Booth No. 514

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EXHIBITOR

Chattanooga GroupBooth No. 900

IOMEDBooth No. 435

Townsend DesignBooth No. 314

AcceleratedCare Plus

Booth No. 1224

BioMedical LifeSystems

Booth No. 1112

EXHIBITOR

64 ◆ T&C M A Y / J U N E 2 0 0 4 ◆ A T H L E T I C B I D . C O M

TOWNSEND DESIGNBOOTH NO. 314

Townsend Design has introduced the next generationof its patented Townsend Motion Hinges for functionaland osteoarthritis knee braces. The new ultra low pro-file TM5 Hinges are half the size of the previous jointdesigns, and reduce the medial-lateral dimension ofTownsend’s braces—at joint line—by nearly one inch.The hinges are available in a variety of materials (air-craft aluminum, stainless steel and titanium), and candecrease the overall weight of the brace by as much asfive ounces.

Circle No. 150

ELECTROTHERAPYACCELERATED CARE PLUS

BOOTH NO. 1224The Patterned Electrical Neuromuscular Stimulator(PENS) uses the pattern of electrical firing in musclesidentified by EMG studies for electrical stimulationprotocols. The FX2 uses biphasic asymmetrical pulsedcurrents to induce contractions in agonist and antago-nist muscles to simulate the “live firing” pattern ofmuscles during normal activities. The muscle contrac-tions in the agonist-antagonist muscle groups pro-duced by EMG patterned stimulation provide afferentinputs that assist in retraining of the CNS and spinalmotor loops to promote normal muscle function.

Circle No. 151

BIOMEDICAL LIFE SYSTEMS, INC.BOOTH NO. 1112

The BioStim NMS+ is a Digital MuscleStimulator/TENS combo unit. When presented withchronic pain, post surgical pain, acute pain, decreasedrange of motion, decreased blood circulation, muscledisuse atrophy, a need for muscle reeducation, orvenous thrombosis, the BioStim NMS+ would be anideal choice. The waveform can be switched fromasymmetrical biphasic square to symmetrical biphasicsquare. The unit has a patient lock/compliance system,allowing the trainer to lock the unit into place to pre-vent the patient from changing the settings, and moni-tors the number of hours the unit has been used. Theunit has five pre-set therapies and three fully program-mable therapies for precision. It also has a timer totime treatments and closes completely so none of thedials can be accidentally bumped. This unit rivals themost powerful portable e-stim units on the market.The unit outputs an amazing 120mA of power to con-tract large muscle groups. It also has an increasedpulse width that can go up to 400 microseconds.

Circle No. 152

BioMedical Life Systems is proud to introduce its newgeneration in Electro-Therapy Devices, the QuadStar®four channel NMS Muscle Stimulator Device. Its com-pact size and user friendly programming features

make the QuadStar’s® design unique among Electro-Therapy Devices. The unit measures 6.75” by 2.75” by1.25” and has an easy to read LCD screen and a digitalkeypad. Simple to understand instructions guide theuser through nine pre-programmed protocols; twotypes of waveforms; symmetrical or asymmetricalbiphasic square; continuous, cycled or reciprocatingstimulation; and adjustable pulse rate and pulse width.The device has a patient lock system that, when acti-vated, prevents the patient from changing any of theset parameters. The device features a graphic represen-tation of the timing parameters directly on the screen.When the Patient Lock System is turned off, a patientcompliance meter is displayed showing how long thedevice was used. A timer allows the patient to use thedevice for a specified period of time. The four channeldevice incorporates touch-proof design and is run byfour AA batteries or a Nova® Wall Adaptor.

Circle No. 153

CHATTANOOGA GROUPBOOTH NO. 900

Chattanooga Group is offering a new line ofPresSsion® Compression Therapy Systems, the Multi 6and the Multi 3. Both are truly high performance gra-dient sequential compression systems at an economi-cal price. The Multi 6 is the top of the line, offeringadjustable treatment parameters and therapy timecontrol. The economical Multi 3 is designed for hometherapy or clinical use.

Circle No. 154

IOMEDBOOTH NO. 435

The TransQ®Flex iontophoresis electrode is specificallydesigned for treating feet, ankles, knees, and othersmall, highly contoured areas of the body. The elec-trode features a unique cloverleaf shape that offersconformity, patient comfort, and optimal drug delivery.TransQFlex is also pH stabilized to eliminate the needfor chemical buffers.

Circle No. 155

IOMED, Inc., the iontophoresis technology leader,introduces Companion 80™, a 24-hour controlledpower iontophoresis system with the battery onboard.Companion 80 is an excellent drug delivery systemwhen clinicians are treating patients who are hypersen-sitive to direct current, as well as when there is limitedtime to provide a 10 to 20 minute iontophoretic treat-ment in the clinic. Companion 80 is IOMED’s MobileSolution™ that allows the patient to resume daily activ-ity while receiving an iontophoresis treatment and theclinician to maximize available clinic time.

Circle No. 156

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PREVIEW

MedXBooth No. 240

Rich-Mar CorporationBooth No. 614

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PREVIEWRICH-MAR CORPORATION

BOOTH NO. 614Rich-Mar’s new AutoSound 7.6 Combo uses thepatented Hands-Free ultrasound design now com-bined with a two-channel stimulator for Hands-FreeCombo and the AutoPrism Light Therapy attachment.The AutoSound 7.6 Combo design provides bettertreatments and incredible time savings for ultrasound,combination, and light therapy treatments, allowingfor longer, more effective treatments. And that makesfor happier patients and staff!

Circle No. 157

LIGHT THERAPYDYNATRONICS

BOOTH NO. 100Shopping for light therapy? Dynatronics introducesSolaris, featuring the New Infrared Cluster Probe gen-erating 500 mW of power at multiple wavelengths—five times the power of competing devices—reducingaverage treatment times by 80% at a fraction of thecost. That’s not all—Solaris also includes Ultrasoundand seven Stim waveforms, making Solaris the mostpowerful and versatile line in the industry.

Circle No. 158

MEDXBOOTH NO. 240

Discover the healing nature of light with FDA-clearedMedX PhotoTherapy. Introduce an innovative, non-invasive, drug-free therapy that can help your patientsheal faster and experience pain relief. MedXPhotoTherapy devices deliver photons of light energyusing low-level laser diodes and SLDs to stimulate thebody’s natural repair processes at the cellular level.MedX PhotoTherapy has proven to be a highly effec-tive professional tool capable of producing significantclinical outcomes.

Circle No. 159

RICH-MAR CORPORATIONBOOTH NO. 614

Rich-Mar now offers innovative light therapy with theAutoPrism unit. This device has over 600 mW of out-put that will allow you to treat larger areas in shorteramounts of time. It has pre-set dosages that allow youto apply 1 J/cm2 in 30 seconds, or you can apply up to10 J/cm2 in five minutes. Perfect for a variety of soft-tissue conditions. The AutoPrism’s unique designallows you to use it as a hand-held applicator for quicktreatments, or simply strap it in place for hands-freeuse with longer protocols. The really nice thing aboutthe AutoPrism is its affordable price.You can get theAutoPrism as an affordable stand-alone product if youjust want to add light therapy.You do not have to buy awhole Stim/US Combo device or a $15,000 “laser.” It isavailable as an attachment for Rich-Mar’s AutoSoundHands-Free ultrasound/stim combos.

Circle No. 160

AQUATIC THERAPYFERNO PERFORMANCE POOLS

BOOTH NO. 822Transform a traditional swimming or lap pool into anaquatic exercise environment with the FernoAquaGaiter™ Underwater Treadmill. Combining tradi-tional treadmill training with the natural properties ofwater such as buoyancy, resistance, and heat, theAquaGaiter is perfect for a low-impact workout. TheAquaGaiter features variable speed adjustments rang-ing from .5 to 8 mph for any level of conditioning. TheAquaGaiter provides athletes with the ultimate waterworkout by strengthening muscles and reducing jointimpact.

Circle No. 161

Ferno offers over 250 custom and fiberglass therapy,rehabilitation, and fitness pools. With various sizes,depths, and custom configurations available, Fernooffers a pool for every facility. Add an underwatertreadmill, aquatic bike, or high-resistance therapy jetsfor the ultimate low-impact workout or therapy ses-sion. Other accessories include pool lifts, benches, andexercise bars. Ferno pools include professional installa-tion by factory technicians. Maximize your athletes’performance with Ferno Performance Pools.

Circle No. 162

SWIMEX SYSTEMSBOOTH NO. 1310

Nearly 50 universities and 38 professional sports teamshave incorporated SwimEx into their aquatic trainingprograms. SwimEx aquatic therapy and sports condi-tioning pools feature a patented paddle-wheel propul-sion system that circulates more than 30,000 gallons oflaminar water flow per minute. Adjustable waterdepths allow for weightless rehabilitation and progres-sive weight-bearing exercise programs. With eightworkstations and a deepwater running platform,SwimEx is a complete isokinetic aquatic therapy sys-tem that facilitates upper and lower extremity exercis-es, running, walking, swimming, and explosive plyo-metrics.

Circle No. 163

SwimEx, premier innovator of total aquatic therapyand sports conditioning solutions, has introduced theSwimEx SPT Aquatic Treadmill™, a first-of-its-kind,self-propelled treadmill that can be used for runningor walking in any SwimEx therapy or fitness pool.While many existing aquatic treadmills stop whenboth of the user’s feet leave the belt, the SwimEx SPT’sunique flywheel mechanism keeps the belt in continu-ous motion, allowing users to run in water without dif-ficulty. Whether the workout is for rehabilitative orconditioning purposes, SwimEx SPT users can walk orrun in a safe, low-impact aquatic environment.

Circle No. 164

DynatronicsBooth No. 100

SwimExSystems

Booth No. 1310

FernoPerformance

PoolsBooth No. 822

Page 68: Training & Conditioning 14.4

Gebauer CompanyBooth No. 1006

BiofreezeBooth No. 215

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GatoradeBooth No. 400

Aircast, Inc.Booth No. 707

GameReady, Inc.Booth No. 1216

EXHIBITOREXHIBITORNUTRITIONTHE GATORADE COMPANY

BOOTH NO. 400Achieving your peak performance is easier if you’reproperly hydrated. Gatorade® Thirst Quencher has anoptimal formula that contains electrolytes and carbo-hydrates. It is based on more than 30 years of scientificresearch and testing. Gatorade Thirst Quencher rehy-drates, replenishes, and refuels better than water. TheGatorade Performance Series is a proven line of sportsnutrition products that give athletes what they need tomaximize their athletic performance. The line includesthe Gatorade Energy Drink (3 flavors), the GatoradeNutrition Shake (chocolate and vanilla), and theGatorade Endurance Hydration Formula, which isavailable in Lemon-Lime flavor. Gatorade EnergyDrink delivers effective levels of carbohydrate fuel forpre-competition or post-exercise. The GatoradeNutrition Shake is designed to provide balanced sportsnutrition for recovery, pre-competition meals, andtraining. The Gatorade Nutrition Shake was recentlyreformulated to improve its taste and give athleteswhat sports nutritionists and strength coaches tell usthey’re seeking: the right kinds of calories when itcounts most. The Gatorade Endurance HydrationFormula has a unique blend of five electrolytesdesigned to meet the needs of elite and endurance ath-letes during their longer, more intense workouts.

Circle No. 165

The Gatorade Company has introduced Gatorade Ice,with a clear and light clean taste that leaves yourmouth quickly. It’s available in strawberry, lime, andorange flavors. Gatorade is the most researched sportsdrink on the planet and rehydrates, replenishes, andrefuels better than water. It’s scientifically formulatedto have the right taste, the right amount of carbs, andno carbonation. Only Gatorade has a complete labora-tory and staff devoted to testing and evaluating itsproducts’ effectiveness on athletes.

Circle No. 166

HOT & COLDAIRCAST, INC.

BOOTH NO. 707The Aircast® Cryo/Cuff® combines the therapeuticbenefits of controlled compression to minimizehemarthosis and swelling and cold to minimize pain.Each cuff is anatomically designed to provide maxi-mum coverage to the injured area. The Cryo/Cuff lineincludes cuffs to fit most areas of the body, includingthe knee, ankle, shoulder, and foot. Simplicity of appli-cation and operation makes the Cryo/Cuff ideal forboth the athletic training room and the home.

Circle No. 167

BIOFREEZEBOOTH NO. 215

For pain management programs, use Biofreeze toreduce swelling, pain and stiffness, next day aches andpains, and recovery time. It can also help to increasemobility and flexibility, and will aid in the overall heal-ing process. Biofreeze can be used in situations requir-ing ice and breathable wraps and can be blended withwater for ice cups. Biofreeze will also prolong theeffects and benefits of Ultrasound and Massage thera-py treatments. Biofreeze is endorsed by the FloridaChiropractic Association, ProSports Chiropractic, theUnited States Taekwondo Union, The Florida StateMassage Therapy Association, The NY State Society ofMassage Therapists, and The Texas Association ofMassage Therapists, and is approved for use by theAmerican Physical Therapy Association.

Circle No. 168

GAME READY, INC.BOOTH NO. 1216

Want to treat your injured athlete with the same cut-ting-edge technology used on the best athletes in theworld, including players for eight of the pro basketballteams in the playoffs? Trainers for 60 pro teams andmore than 70 universities rely on the Game ReadyAccelerated Recovery System, a portable system thatsimultaneously provides adjustable cold therapy andintermittent compression via a control unit and patent-ed wraps. The easy-to-administer treatment helpsreduce pain and swelling and helps speed time ofrecovery.

Circle No. 169

GEBAUER COMPANYBOOTH NO. 1006

From the most trusted name in skin refrigerants forover 100 years comes a new, non-prescription topicalskin refrigerant, Gebauer’s Instant Ice™. Use it like icefor the temporary relief of minor pain and swellingfrom sprains and strains, minor sports injuries, bruis-ing, and contusions. Instead of using ice to treat on-the-scene minor sports injuries, high school and recre-ational league coaches, high school athletic trainers,and others will now be able to use what professionalathletic trainers use. In fact, Jim Ramsay, head athletictrainer for the New York Rangers, has been usingGebauer topical skin refrigerants for years.“Instant Iceis great for on-the-scene care,” said Ramsay.“If a playergets hit on the wrist or takes a puck off the shin, I caneasily anesthetize the area with Instant Ice to reducethe pain, allowing the player to get back in the gamequickly.”

Circle No. 170

The Gebauer Company has introduced Gebauer’s Sprayand Stretch, which replaces Gebauer’s Fluori-Methane.Non-ozone depleting Gebauer’s Spray and Stretch is anonflammable topical skin refrigerant intended for usewith the Spray & Stretch Technique in the manage-

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Whitehall ManufacturingBooth No. 1009

Ball Dynamics InternationalBooth No. 326

MuellerSports

MedicineBooth No. 626

ContemporaryDesign

Booth No. 422

A T H L E T I C B I D . C O M ◆ T&C M A Y / J U N E 2 0 0 4 ◆ 67

R PREVIEWPREVIEWment of myofascial pain, restricted motion, musclespasms, and the temporary relief of minor sportsinjuries. Used to reduce or relieve the initial trauma ofan injury, Gebauer’s Spray and Stretch controls the painof bruises, contusions, swelling, and minor sprains.

Circle No. 171

MUELLER SPORTS MEDICINEBOOTH NO. 626

Mueller’s new Cold/Hot Therapy Wrap offers quick, no-mess application of cold packs on the sidelines or thepractice field and is easy to use on either small or largebody parts. Adjustable side flaps and a detachableextension strap secure the wrap in place. The smallwrap is ideal for ankles, wrists,or elbows, and holds one4.75” x 6” reusable cold pack. The large wrap holds one6” x 9” reusable cold pack and easily accommodateslarger body parts. Two reusable cold packs are includedwith the small wrap and the large Therapy Wrap comeswith one reusable cold pack.

Circle No. 172

THERMOTEK, INC.BOOTH NO. 947

ProThermo is the first thermoelectric therapy devicethat delivers heat, cold, contrast, and compression—without ice. The unit easily attaches to a variety ofblankets that are body-part specific to effectively wrapinjuries. ProThermo offers programmable treatmentand memory functions, and temperature control withina degree. This professional system was designed withthe help of orthopaedic surgeons, trainers, and coachesto accelerate recovery and reduce the need for painmedication.

Circle No. 173

WHITEHALL MANUFACTURINGBOOTH NO. 1009

Whitehall Manufacturing’s complete line of moist heattherapy treatment products is designed to be easy andconvenient to use. Each heating unit is fabricated fromheavy gauge stainless steel and polished to a satin fin-ish. Standard features include a snap-off thermal pro-tector that prevents overheating and rounded bottomsthat minimize bacteria build-up. The heating units areavailable in various sizes and colors.

Circle No. 174

The ThermaSplint™, from Whitehall Manufacturing,features dual voltage, an illuminated on/off switch, andquick heat-up time. The unit operates on a solar pow-ered digital thermometer that allows the temperatureto be adjusted with digital readouts for different splint-ing thermoplastics. The ThermaSplint is constructedfrom heavy gauge stainless steel.

Circle No. 175

STRENGTH & FITNESSBALL DYNAMICS INTERNATIONAL

BOOTH NO. 326FitBALL® USA has introduced the next generation ofthe #1 burst-resistant exercise ball—the FitBALLSPORT. More firm than the original, the FitBALLSPORT offers a professional-quality alternative to econ-omy exercise balls. FitBALL products have always setthe standard for safety, durability, and quality. TheFitBALL SPORT continues the tradition—made of aunique material that prevents sudden loss of pressurein case the ball is punctured.

Circle No. 176

CONTEMPORARY DESIGN COMPANYBOOTH NO. 422

The Shuttle Balance functionally trains the neuromus-cular system of athletes and seniors alike. It’s long beenrecognized that the body’s ability to negotiate unpre-dictable changes in force, direction, and placement inspace at the neuromuscular level are critical buildingblocks for performance and skill development. TheShuttle Balance provides a safe platform for individualsto develop and hone proprioceptive responses whileperforming a variety of activities.

Circle No. 177

Imagine a leg press that allows you to sprint, jump, hop,press, and train for specific sports or general condition-ing. The new Shuttle MVP Elite offers more trainingoptions through increased resistance and standardaccessories. It is unmatched for improving core stabilityand lower body strength, developing speed and quick-ness, and effectively linking weight training with per-formance. Rapidly reactive rebounding action andgravity reduced body positioning minimize jointimpact.

Circle No. 178

DONOVAN INDUSTRIES, INC.BOOTH NO. 537

Donovan™ Latex Bands are manufactured to the high-est standards using superior formulation and manufac-turing processes resulting in superior strength, resist-ance, and the most consistent performance in theindustry. Donovan Bands and Tubing utilize an easilyunderstood light-dark color-coding system offering upto eight levels of resistance, including very heavy-dutyresistances.

Circle No. 179

ThermotekBooth No. 947

Donovan IndustriesBooth No. 537

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68 ◆ T&C M A Y / J U N E 2 0 0 4 ◆ A T H L E T I C B I D . C O M

ExertoolsBooth No. 217

HammerStrength

Booth No. 1200

EXHIBITOREXHIBITOREFI SPORTS MEDICINE

BOOTH NO. 1402efi Sports Medicine’s electric Power Tower™ no longerrequires a client to get on and off the unit betweenexercises, and delivers level changes at the touch of abutton. The Power Tower features a ground-breakingdynamic pulley system that adjusts to girth and heightto allow for optimum force angles specific to each exer-cise. Other features include a wide base, telescopingsquat stand with three adjustable heights, built-in pull-up bars, and a fold-away foot holder for hamstring andabdominal work.

Circle No. 180

EXERTOOLSBOOTH NO. 217

Exertools, the originator of medicine ball reboundingsystems, is now shipping the new and improved PLY-OBACK™ Rebounder. Time-tested and clinicallyproven, the new unit comes with an improved doubleclamping unit with hardened bolts, tightened angles,heavy-duty multiple zigzag stitching on doubled trampmaterial, and a hefty vinyl spring cover that protectsthe ball and user from errant throws. Recognized bymany as the most durable rebounder, the PLYOBACK isnow available for under $500.00, comes with a two-yearwarranty, and can ship in days.

Circle No. 181

HAMMER STRENGTHBOOTH NO. 1200

Hammer Strength recently introduced an eight-footOlympic Heavy-Duty Power Rack ideal for athletic fit-ness facilities. With the Hammer Strength heritage ofsimple, durable construction and the highest-qualitycomponents, the unit is constructed with heavy-dutynine-gauge, 3”x 3” steel tubing. The adjustment rack,which supports the bar supports and bar catches, isnumbered for quick and easy position identification. Italso is equipped with a non-slip spotter stand, andmultiple grip positions are provided for pull-ups andchin-ups. The Dock ‘N Lock bench-locking system letsthe adjustable bench lock into place quickly andensures the bench is always aligned properly in relationto the rack.

Circle No. 182

OPTPBOOTH NO. 825

The patented Stretch Out® Strap delivers the benefits ofPNF (proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation)stretching without a partner. This type of stretchingcombines isotonic, isometric, and prolonged stretch.

Alternating a stretch with a “relax phase” while usingthe Stretch Out Strap allows for maximum flexibilityand decreases risk of injury. Each Stretch Out Strapcomes with a newly updated stretching guide with over28 illustrations for the hamstrings, quads, inner andouter thighs, back, sides, chest, and arms.

Circle No. 183

OPTP introduces the versatile, inflatable exercise rollcalled the FitBALL® Roller. It combines the best aspectsof inflatable exercise balls and foam rollers into onedynamic inflatable fitness roll. The FitBALL Rollerallows you to optimize exercises that strengthen andtone the abs, obliques, and core muscle groups. Sizedfor exercise effectiveness (approx. 30” x 7” dia. inflated),the FitBALL Roller is constructed of durable, burst-resistant vinyl that will support up to 440 lbs. It comescomplete with an illustrated poster featuring eight exer-cises and a usage guide.

Circle No. 184

PERFORM BETTERBOOTH NO. 1105

A slide board that lies flat on every surface—hard orcarpeted—will not buckle, yet is lightweight and rollsup so you can easily take it with you. Sound like a goodidea? The 2004 Perform Better catalog offers the newGoaler Slide Board with patented end stops. It is avail-able in two models: standard and professional, andboth are 20” wide.

Circle No. 185

POWER SYSTEMS, INC.BOOTH NO. 923

The Balance Disc is a functional air-filled cushion thatcan be incorporated into workouts for enhanced bal-ance and core training. Build core strength by using oneor two cushions for push-ups, lunges, and squats.Enhance balance techniques by doing sitting, standingand lying exercises. It is made of pliable, durable PVC.

Circle No. 186

PREPAK PRODUCTS, INC.BOOTH NO. 1025

The Power Trainer Pro is an exercise bar that is usedwith stretch tubing to deliver a total body exerciseexperience. It is made from strong, lightweight fiber-glass tubing and is exceptionally durable. The patentedSTA-LOK technology allows the user to securely andquickly attach any tubing resistance to the bar. Use thePower Trainer Pro in the gym, on the field, at home, oron the go. Work out anywhere in any plane of motion.

Circle No. 187

OPTPBooth No. 825

Perform BetterBooth No. 1105

Power SystemsBooth No. 923

PrePakProducts

Booth No. 1025

efi Sports MedicineBooth No. 1402

Page 71: Training & Conditioning 14.4

National Academyof Sports Medicine

Booth No. 200

Human KineticsBooth No. 720

A T H L E T I C B I D . C O M ◆ T&C M A Y / J U N E 2 0 0 4 ◆ 69

LippincottWilliams& Wilkins

Booth No. 1024

R PREVIEWPREVIEWEDUCATIONHUMAN KINETICS

BOOTH NO. 720“The Hand and Wrist in Sport” is worth 10.0 NATACEUs and will expand your understanding of the clini-cal examination and rehabilitation of an athlete’s handand wrist. The course includes one year of Internetaccess to Interactive Hand 2000, a 3-D model createdby Primal Pictures.You will learn how to give a physi-cal examination, how to effectively use splints, andhow to design treatment plans for your clients.

Circle No. 188

“Care and Treatment of Asthma in Athletes” is an inter-active on-line course that is worth 12.5 NATA BOCCEUs and will help you understand, identify, and workwith athletes who have exercise-induced asthma.“Careand Treatment of Asthma in Athletes” enhances yourpersonal understanding of the pathology and basicmechanisms of asthma as well as prevention and con-trol techniques. This interactive approach guides youthrough the exercises and parallels what you’llencounter in actual settings.

Circle No. 189

LIPPINCOTT WILLIAMS & WILKINSBOOTH NO. 1024

ACSM’s Health-Related Physical Fitness AssessmentManual, the newest book from the American College ofSports Medicine (ACSM), is a practical guide forassessing individuals’ physical fitness levels effectivelyand efficiently and serves as an authoritative referencefor theory and practice. The book’s straightforward,how-to writing style and organization guide readers inthe practice of performing assessments across fivemajor health-related physical fitness components: car-diorespiratory fitness, body composition, muscularstrength, muscular endurance, and flexibility.

Circle No. 190

Lippincott Williams & Wilkins (LWW), a subsidiary ofWolters Kluwer NV, is a leading international publisherof professional health information. LWW providesessential information for athletic trainers, health andfitness professionals, and students in print and elec-tronic formats—including textbooks, journals, CD-ROMs, and via Intranets and the Internet.Visit the

company’s booth at the NATA meeting or check out itsWeb site to see its athletic training, sports medicine,and health and fitness products.

Circle No. 191

NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SPORTSMEDICINE (NASM)

BOOTH NO. 200The athlete’s ability to consistently perform at higherlevels while avoiding injury is essential to his or herlong-term success in any sporting arena. Drawing onan exclusive system that has successfully empoweredpeak performance in professional, Olympic, collegeand high-school athletes, the Optimum PerformanceTraining™ method for the performance enhancementspecialist sets the international pace for athletic-train-ing and sports medicine professionals.

Circle No. 192

NSCA CERTIFICATION COMMISSIONBOOTH NO. 318

Released in January 2004, the NSCA’s Essentials ofPersonal Training is the primary preparation source forthe NSCA-Certified Personal Trainer® examination, aswell as an authoritative resource for all professionals inthe personal training field. The text includes contribu-tions from leading renowned researchers, educators,and personal training experts who provide the scien-tific principles, concepts, and theories of personaltraining and practical applications to safe and effectivetraining, exercise technique, and program design.($63.00 for NSCA members/$70.00 for non-members.)

Circle No. 193

The Essentials of Strength Training and ConditioningSymposium workbook and audio recordings have beenupdated with new lectures recorded on 15 audio CDs.Over 13 hours of audio taped from a live symposiumreview the major content areas of the CSCS exam. Theworkbook contains the lecture outlines, glossaries, fig-ures and tables for 10 different presentations. Theaudio CD track menus allow you to easily find a topicor conveniently return to a certain track. ($89.95 forNSCA members/$134.95 for non-members.)

Circle No. 194

NSCA CertificationCommission

Booth No. 318

Page 72: Training & Conditioning 14.4

EXHIBITOREXHIBITOR

70 ◆ T&C M A Y / J U N E 2 0 0 4 ◆ A T H L E T I C B I D . C O M

THE NATIONAL STRENGTH ANDCONDITIONING ASSOCIATION (NSCA)

BOOTH NO. 318The National Strength and Conditioning Association(NSCA), the worldwide authority on strength trainingand athletic conditioning, will conduct its 27thNational Conference on July 14-17, 2004 inMinneapolis, Minn. This premier strength and condi-tioning conference attracts nearly 2,000 professionalsfrom around the world. Highlights of the conferenceinclude: Keynote speaker Dr. Stuart McGill; over 50sessions from world-renowned speakers; originalabstracts presented from over 100 researchers; andmore than 150 booths.

Circle No. 195

Join the National Strength and ConditioningAssociation (NSCA) today at a special show discountrate and take advantage of all your membership has tooffer. At the NSCA, your membership dollars support afull menu of benefits and services, including: theStrength and Conditioning Journal, the Journal ofStrength and Conditioning Research, and access to thepast 26 years of NSCA journals and articles online; anational certification program; NSCA Career Center;

online Certified Personal Trainers Locator program;professional liability insurance; scholarships, andgrants and education financial assistance through theCapital for Knowledge® program, the CoachPractitioner program, and Student Assistantship; andvaluable education resources, to name a few.

Circle No. 196

CLIMATE CONTROLCOOL DRAFT SCIENTIFIC

BOOTH NO. TBDFor the 2004 season, Cool Draft Scientific presents itsfully-redesigned Cool Draft misting fans. Cool Draftoffers a portable and affordable way to cool over a1,000 square foot area, is virtually maintenance free,and has been designed to last for years. The chilledbreeze generated by Cool Draft gently lowers bodytemperature. Combined with an effective rehab proto-col, Cool Draft substantially reduces the dangers asso-ciated with heat stress.

Circle No. 197

National Strength andConditioning Association

Booth No. 318

Cool DraftScientific

Booth No. TBD

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Request No. 44 NATA Booth No. 217

The FUTURE of Injury Tracking is HERE

“The most advanced technology at an affordable price.”

WEB-BASED Injury Tracking NOW

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For a FREE DEMONSTRATION go to

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Request No. 45 NATA Booth No. 208

Page 73: Training & Conditioning 14.4

PREVIEW

A T H L E T I C B I D . C O M ◆ T&C M A Y / J U N E 2 0 0 4 ◆ 71

PREVIEWCRAMER PRODUCTS

BOOTH NO. 201The Coil Cool is an economical, efficient source fordispensing cold drinking water. A copper coil insidethe cooler carries drinking water from the waterportable hose attachment to the drinking hoses thathang on the sides of the cooler. Just add ice to thecooler, attach your water portable hose, and crisp coolwater is available through four adjustable drinkingnozzles.

Circle No. 198

NEW PRODUCTS TO LOOK FOR AT THE 2004 SHOW3-POINT PRODUCTS, INC.

BOOTH NO. 2273-Point Products’ new Action® Ultra thumb splintsprovide the perfect balance of comfort and control,and are ideal for use during athletic participation.Ultra splints can be gently shaped by hand to achievea custom fit in seconds and are fully padded for com-fortable cushioning. Choose the Action® Ultra Spicawhenever wrist and thumb control are needed forsupport and protection. With free wrist motion theAction® Ultra MP is ideal to protect Gamekeeper’sThumb or MP dislocation injuries.

Circle No. 199

CHATTANOOGA GROUPBOOTH NO. 900

Chattanooga Group is pleased to introduce the newVectra™ Genisys.Vectra Genisys is the first modulartherapy system that consolidates six therapeuticmodalities into one system. The clinician can accessdual channel sEMG, sEMG activated muscle stimula-tion, multiple waveform electrotherapy, dual frequen-cy ultrasound, and combination electrotherapy. TheGenisys also offers the ability to add two more chan-nels of electrotherapy, a battery, or a future lasermodule.

Circle No. 200

COMPEX BOOTH NO. 917

Compex Sport is a portable electrical muscle stimula-tion (EMS) device that delivers proven results. Foryears, athletes have used Compex with its proprietarySwiss technology to increase muscle strength, size,power and endurance, and for faster muscle recovery.The electronics produce powerful, exhilarating con-tractions—putting muscles through training pro-grams that adhere to the principles of training physi-ology. This device is FDA-cleared for sale and avail-able in the United States.

Circle No. 201

CRAMER PRODUCTS, INC.BOOTH NO. 201

Cramer’s new AS1 Ankle Brace combines the supportof a heel-lock strapping system and superior valueversus comparable ankle braces. The brace is con-structed with an 840 D nylon shell with a soft neo-prene liner for comfort and feel. Non-stretch strapslock in the heel, and spring steel stays on each side ofthe brace provide additional support.

Circle No. 202

MUELLER SPORTS MEDICINEBOOTH NO. 626

The new ATF® Ankle Brace features the patentedinner ATF® Strap now redesigned to self-adjust toeach individual foot for a universal fit. The braceoffers superior protection against inversion sprainswhile allowing complete plantar and dorsal flexion.Bi-directional stretch elastic over the Achilles tendonarea, Comfort Windows™ and flexible steel springsadd to the effectiveness of this brace. The high-strength cordura fabric eliminates the need for metaleyelets and adds to the comfortable custom fit.Available in sizes XS-XL.

Circle No. 203

NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SPORTSMEDICINE (NASM)

BOOTH NO. 200The National Academy of Sports Medicine (NASM) isproud to present Body Map, a unique, state-of-the-artdynamic movement assessment and program-designtool that will revolutionize the way you train. Whetheryour goal is to lose fat, gain muscle, or increase yourperformance in a specific sport, Body Map helps youreach your goals quickly, safely, and effectively. Basedon NASM’s exclusive Optimum Performance Training(OPT™) model, Body Map takes less than 10 minutesand creates individualized assessments and correc-tive strategies including flexibility, postural controland functional strength. If success is your destina-tion, let the Body Map be your guide!

Circle No. 204

TOWNSEND DESIGNBOOTH NO. 314

Townsend Design has released a new generation ofcustom and pre-sized functional knee braces. The2004 edition of Townsend’s acclaimed Premiergraphite shell brace weighs in at just 16 ounces. Thenew RebelTM5 (fabricated from aircraft aluminum)weighs only 18 ounces. These braces featureTownsend’s patented hinge motion and suspensiontechnology—and are backed by a no migration guar-antee. New shell options are available to maximizecontrol and prevent injuries.

Circle No. 205

Cramer ProductsBooth No. 201

NationalAcademy of

SportsMedicine

Booth No. 200

Mueller SportsMedicine

Booth No. 626

3-PointProducts

Booth No. 227

TownsendDesign

Booth No. 314

ChattanoogaGroup

Booth No. 900

CompexBooth No. 917

Page 74: Training & Conditioning 14.4

72 ◆ T&C M A Y / J U N E 2 0 0 4 ◆ A T H L E T I C B I D . C O M72 ◆ T&C M A Y / J U N E 2 0 0 4 ◆ A T H L E T I C B I D . C O M

3-Point Products . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2271100 Butterworth Court, Stevensville, MD 21666Phone: 410-604-6393 • Web: www.3pointproducts.come-mail: [email protected] and upper extremity supports for safe, improved ath-letic performanceCategories: Braces & Supports, Trainer’s Room/SportsMedicine SuppliesSee Ad Page 83 See Product Writeup Page 71

4D Rubber Ltd Co. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .933Delves Road, Heanor Gate Ind. Estate, Derbyshire, EnglandPhone: 561-686-2619

A.T. Sources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .428217 N. Manda Rd., Havertown, PA 19083Phone: 609-760-8907 • Web: www.atsources.com Categories: Employment Service

A.T. Still University, AZ School of Health Sciences .439800 W. Jefferson St., Kirksville, MO 63501Phone: 660-626-2307 • Web: www.atsu.eduCategories: Educational Materials, Education

A-Athletic & Medical Supply Co., Inc. . . . . . . . .727406 Link Rd., Houston, TX 77009Phone: 713-861-4777 • Web: www.a-athletics.come-mail: [email protected]: Athletic Equipment/Apparel, Braces & Supports,Hot & Cold Treatment, Trainer’s Room/Sports MedicineSupplies

Accelerade/Pacific Health Labs . . . . . . . . . . . .547100 Matawan Rd., Ste. 420, Matawan, NJ 07747Phone: 732-739-2900Categories: Nutrition, Hydration

Accelerated Care Plus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12249855 Double R Blvd., Ste. 100, Reno, NV 89521Phone: 800-350-1100 • Web: www.acplus.comCategories: ElectrotherapySee Ad Page 77 See Product Writeups Page 64

Active Ankle Systems, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1114509 Barret Ave., Louisville, KY 40204Phone: 502-582-2655 • Web: www.activeankle.com e-mail: [email protected]: Braces & Supports, Trainer’s Room/SportsMedicine Supplies

Actsys Medical, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .131531186 La Baya Dr., Westlake Village, CA 91362Phone: 818-879-2700 • Web: actsysmedical.com

Adams USA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .625P.O. Box 489, Cookeville, TN 38502Phone: 800-251-6857 • Web: www.adamsusa.comCategories: Athletic Equipment/Apparel

Advance Newsmagazine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2202900 Horizon Dr., King of Prussia, PA 19406Phone: 610-278-1400

Aegis Sciences Corporation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .426345 Hill Ave., Nashville, TN 37210Phone: 615-255-2400 • Web: www.aegislabs.comCategories: Trainer’s Room/Sports Medicine Supplies

Aiken Compounding Pharmacy . . . . . . . . . . . .222333 Newberry St., NW, Aiken, SC 29801 Phone: 866-649-1776 • Web: www.dexrx.come-mail: [email protected]: Electrotherapy, Massage Products

Aircast, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70792 River Rd., Summit, NJ 07901Phone: 800-526-8785 • Web: www.aircast.comAnkle braces and cryo compression devicesCategories: Braces & Supports, Hot & Cold Treatment,Trainer’s Room/Sports Medicine SuppliesSee Ad Page 9 See Product Writeups Pages 62 & 66

Airex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .130455 W. Port Plaza, Ste. 625, St. Louis, MO 63146Phone: 314-542-9105 • Web: www.alcanairex.come-mail: [email protected]: Rehab Equipment, Balance Training Products

Al Rice & Associates, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12083307 Industrial Pkwy., Jeffersonville, IN 47130Phone: 800-456-1142 • Web: www.alrice.comCategories: Electrotherapy, Hot & Cold Treatment, RehabEquipment, Trainer’s Room/Sports Medicine Supplies

Alert Services, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .622P.O. Box 1088, San Marcos, TX 78667Phone: 830-372-3333 • Web: www.alertservices.comCategories: Braces & Supports, Hot & Cold Treatment,Rehab Equipment, Trainer’s Room/Sports Medicine Supplies

Ali Med, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1104297 High St., Dedham, MA 02026Phone: 800-225-2610 • Web: www.alimed.comCategories: Braces & Supports

Ambra LeRoy Medical Products . . . . . . . . . . .12364335 - C Taggart Creek Rd., Charlotte, NC 28208Phone: 866-203-4760 • Web: www.ambraleroy.comCategories: Braces & Supports, Trainer’s Room/SportsMedicine Supplies

American Podiatric Medical Association . . . . .13069312 Old Georgetown Rd., Bethesda, MD 20814Phone: 800-366-8227 • Web: www.apma.org

American Red Cross . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14208111 Gatehouse Rd., Falls Church, VA 22042Phone: 703-206-7631 • Web: www.redcross.org

Amerisport . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5202695 N. Lurkin, Fresno, CA 93727Phone: 800-766-7878 • Web: www.amerisport.comCategories: Athletic Training Bags

AMREX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1012641 E. Walnut St., Carson, CA 90746Phone: 800-221-9069 • Web: www.amrex-zetron.come-mail: [email protected]: Electrotherapy

Andover Coated Products, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . .9079 Fanaras Dr., Salisbury, MA 01952Phone: 800-432-6686 • Web: www.andovercoated.comCategories: Braces & Supports, Trainer’s Room/SportsMedicine Supplies

Antibody, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .232P.O. Box 42074, Cincinnati, OH 45242Phone: 513-793-1566

Ari-Med/Bushwalker Bags/Diversa Products .10011615 W. University Dr., Ste. 135, Tempe, AZ 85281Phone: 800-527-4923 • Web: www.bushwalkerbags.comCategories: Trainer’s Room/Sports Medicine Supplies

Arrowhead Athletics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .612P.O. Box 4264, Andover, MA 01810Phone: 800-225-1516Categories: Trainer’s Room/Sports Medicine Supplies,Athletic Tape

Asics America Corp. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72916275 Laguna Canyon Rd., Irvine, CA 92618Phone: 949-453-8888 • Web: www.asics.comCategories: Athletic Equipment/Apparel, Footwear

Backproject . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11221693 Samedra St., Sunnyvale, CA 94087Phone: 408-404-8100 • Web: www.backproject.comCategories: Rehab Equipment

Bailey Manufacturing Co. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .910118 Lee St., Lodi, OH 44254Phone: 800-321-8372 • Web: www.baileymfg.com Categories: Rehab Equipment, Trainer’s Room/SportsMedicine Supplies, Massage Products

Bauerfeind USA, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .101355 Chastain Rd., Ste. 112, Kennesaw, GA 30144Phone: 800-423-3405 • Web: www.bauerfeindusa.comCategories: Braces & Supports, Trainer’s Room/SportsMedicine Supplies

BcB Products . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5395520 E. 2nd St., #E, Long Beach, CA 90803Phone: 562-433-6392

Bike Athletic Company . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .914755 Lee St., Alexander City, AL 35010Phone: 256-500-5265 • Web: www.bikeathletic.comCategories: Athletic Equipment/Apparel, Braces & Supports,Hot & Cold Treatment, Magnetic Therapy

Bio Compression Systems, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . .728120 W. Commercial Ave., Moonachie, NJ 07074Phone: 201-939-0716 • Web: www.biocompression.comCategories: Rehab Equipment, Trainer’s Room/SportsMedicine Supplies

Bio Skin/Cropper Medical, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . .322240 E. Hersey St., Ste. 2, Ashland, OR 97520Phone: 541-488-0600 • Web: www.bioskin.comBio Skin Compression supports: Lightweight, low profile,durable, completely hypoallergenicCategories: Athletic Equipment/Apparel, Braces & SupportsSee Ad Page 39 See Product Writeups Page 62

Biodex Medical Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .41420 Ramsay Rd., Shirley, NY 11967-0702Phone: 631-924-9000 • Web: www.biodex.comCategories: Braces & Supports, Cardiovascular & StrengthTraining Equipment, Electrotherapy, Rehab Equipment

BioEx Systems, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .719P.O. Box 926, Smithville, TX 78957Phone: 800-750-2756 • Web: www.bioexsystems.comCategories: Educational Materials, Rehab Equipment,Software

Biofreeze/Performance Health, Inc. . . . . . . . . .2151017 Boyd Rd., Export, PA 15632Phone: 800-246-3733 • Web: www.biofreeze.comBiofreeze is a versatile pain reliever to enhance modalitiesand relieve pain.Categories: Hot & Cold Treatment, Trainer’s Room/SportsMedicine Supplies, Massage Products, Pain Relief, TopicalsSee Ad Page 11 See Product Writeups Pages 60 & 66

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BioLife LLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8291235 Tallevast Rd., Sarasota, FL 34243Phone: 941-360-1300 • Web: www.biolife.comCategories: Trainer’s Room/Sports Medicine Supplies,Wound Care Products

Biomechanical Services, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . .10231050 Central Ave., Ste. D., Brea, CA 92821Phone: 800-942-2272 • Web: www.biomechanical.comCategories: Braces & Supports, Rehab Equipment, Trainer’sRoom/Sports Medicine Supplies

Biomechanics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .633600 Harrison St., San Francisco, CA 94107Phone: 415-947-6000

BioMedical Life Systems, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . .1112P.O. Box 1360, Vista, CA 92085Phone: 800-726-8367 • Web: www.bmls.comManufacturer of portable electrotherapy devices and accessories.Categories: ElectrotherapySee Ad Page 45 See Product Writeups Page 64

Bledsoe Brace Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8212601 Pinewood Dr., Grand Prairie, TX 75051Phone: 972-647-0884 • Web: www.bledsoebrace.comCategories: Braces & Supports

Bluewave . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .43714401 S.E. First St., Vancouver, WA 98684Phone: 360-929-6430Categories: Rehab Equipment

BNA Modular Concepts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1491895 East 56 Rd., Lecompton, KS 66050Phone: 800-432-2955 • Web: www.bnaModularConcepts.comModular attachments for transporting players and staff onJohn Deere GatorsCategories: Trainer’s Room/Sports Medicine SuppliesSee Ad Page 33 See Product Writeups Page 60

Board of Certification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14144223 S. 143rd Circle, Omaha, NE 68137Phone: 402-559-0091 • Web: www.nataboc.orgCategories: Educational Materials

Borden Perlman . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5352850 Brunswick Pike, Lawrenceville, NJ 08648Phone: 609-896-3434 • Web: www.bordenperlman.comCategories: Insurance

Bracefit.com . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .732310 E. 4500 S., Ste. 550, Salt Lake City, UT 84107Phone: 800-644-1968 • Web: www.bracefit.comCategories: Braces & Supports

Brain-Pads, Inc. (formerly WIPSS) . . . . . . . . . .328322 Fayette St., Conshohocken, PA 19428Phone: 610-397-0893 • Web: www.brainpads.comCategories: Braces & Supports

Brecon Knitting Mill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1008P.O. Box 478, Talladega, AL 35161Phone: 800-841-2821 • Web: www.breconknittingmill.comCategories: Trainer’s Room/Sports Medicine Supplies

BREG, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4212611 Commerce Way, Vista, CA 92083Phone: 800-321-0607 • Web: www.breg.comCategories: Brace & Supports, Hot & Cold Treatment

BSN-Jobst, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8005825 Carnegie Blvd., Charlotte, NC 28209Phone: 800-221-7573 • Web: www.jobst-usa.comManufacturer of sports medicine products, wound, casting,and vascular products.Categories: Trainer’s Room/Sports Medicine Supplies, Athletic TapeSee Ad Page 43 See Product Writeups Page 60

BTE Technologies, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11197455 L New Ridge Rd., Hanover, MD 21076Phone: 800-331-8845 • Web: www.btetech.comCategories: Cardiovascular & Strength Training Equipment,Rehab Equipment, Computerized Testing and Training Devices

Carpal Therapy, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2341236 Waldemere Ave., Indianapolis, IN 46241Phone: 317-313-0680 • Web: grastonhallmethod.com

CDM Sport/Back Systems, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . .926816 Ladera Dr., Fort Worth, TX 76108Phone: 800-400-7542 • Web: www.cdmsport.comCategories: Rehab Equipment

SPONSORED BY

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THERMALATOR TREATMENT PRODUCTSIn addition to our quality whirlpools,Whitehall carries various other quality prod-ucts for patient rehabilitation. Our com-plete line of moist heat therapy treatment products is designed to be easy and con-venient to use.

For more information: www.whitehallmfg.com • (800) 782-7706 • (626) 968-6681Request No. 46 NATA Booth No. 1009

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Chattanooga Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9004717 Adams Rd., Hixson, TN 37343Phone: 800-592-7329 • Web: www.chattgroup.comA leader in physical medicine products for over 50 years.Categories: Electrotherapy, Hot & Cold Treatment,Treatment & Traction TablesSee Ad Page 12 See Product Writeups Pages 64 & 71

Climatech Safety, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .347P.O. Box 1035, 115 Windmill Point Rd., White Stone, VA 22578Phone: 804-436-0089 • Web: climatechsafety.com

Coca-Cola North America . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1221One Coca-Cola Plaza, Atlanta, GA 30313Phone: 800-438-2653 • Web: www.powerade.comCategories: Nutrition

CogSport . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .83051 Leicester St., Carlton, Victoria, AustraliaPhone: 613-93491300 • Web: www.cogsport.comCategories: Concussion Management Systems

Collins Sports Medicine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .121087 Westgate Dr., Brockton, MA 02301Phone: 508-580-2825 • Web: www.collinssportsmedicine.comCategories: Rehab Equipment

ComforTrac, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1129P.O. Box 580, McLean, VA 22101Phone: 703-891-0455 • Web: www.comfortrac.netCategories: Electrotherapy

Compex Technologies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9171811 Old Highway 8, New Brighton, MN 55112Phone: 651-631-0590 • Web: www.compextechnologies.comCategories: Cardiovascular EquipmentSee Ad Page 90 See Product Writeup Page 71

Contour Pak® Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1124346 Rheem Blvd., Ste. 104, Moraga, CA 94556Phone: 800-926-2228 • Web: www.contourpak.comCategories: Hot & Cold Treatment

Cool Draft Scientific . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .TBD66059 McGregor Rd., Bellaire, OH 43906Phone: 866-676-1636 • Web: www.cooldraft.comPortable misting systemCategories: Athletic Equipment/Apparel, Trainer’sRoom/Sports Medicine Supplies, Sideline EquipmentSee Ad Page 54 See Product Writeup Page 70

Cool Shirt/Shafer Enterprises LLC . . . . . . . . . .230P.O. Box 712, Jonesboro, GA 30237Phone: 770-477-1455 • Web: www.coolshirt.net

Core Products International . . . . . . . . . . . . .1125808 Prospect Ave., Osceola, WI 54020Phone: 715-294-2050 • Web: www.coreproducts.comCategories: Braces & Supports, Hot & Cold Treatment,Rehab Equipment, Magnetic Therapy

Cramer Products, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .201153 W. Warren, P.O. Box 1001, Gardner, KS 66030Phone: 800-345-2231 • Web: www.cramersportsmed.comCategories: Braces & Supports, Educational Materials, Hot &Cold Treatment, Trainer’s Room/Sports Medicine SuppliesSee Ad Page 85 See Product Writeups Page 71

Creative Custom Products, LLC . . . . . . . . . . .1005P.O. Box 414, Cedarburg, WI 53012Phone: 800-368-8182 • Web: www.creativecustomproducts.comCategories: Trainer’s Room/Sports Medicine Supplies

CSMI - Computer Sports Medicine, Inc. . . . . . .808101 Tosca Dr., Stoughton, MA 02072Phone: 781-297-2034 • Web: www.csmisolutions.comCategories: Rehab Equipment, Software

Cybex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .44110 Trotter Dr., Medway, MA 02053Phone: 508-533-4300 • Web: www.cybexintl.com

Deroyal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .629200 DeBusk Ln., Powell, TN 37849Phone: 800-DEROYAL • Web: www.deroyal.comCategories: Braces & Supports

dj Orthopedics, LLC . . . . . .1328,1330,1229,12312985 Scott St., Vista, CA 92083Phone: 800-321-9549 • Web: www.djortho.comCategories: Braces & Supports, Electrotherapy, Hot & ColdTreatment, Trainer’s Room/Sports Medicine Supplies

DM Systems, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11111316 Sherman Ave., Evanston, IL 60201Phone: 800-254-5438 • Web: www.dmsystems.comDM Systems, Inc. manufactures and distributes the AnkleTough®

Rehab System and the Cadlow™ Shoulder Stabilizer.Categories: Braces & SupportsSee Ad Page 21 See Product Writeups Page 60

DMS, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3312711 E. Coast Highway., Ste. 206, Corona del Mar, CA 92625Phone: 877-368-7523 • Web: www.d-m-s-.comCategories: Cardiovascular & Strength Training Equipment,Rehab Equipment, Trainer’s Room/Sports Medicine Supplies,Massage Products

Doctor’s Orders Medical Engineering . . . . . . . .448731B Construction Court, Zeeland, MI 49464Phone: 616-886-7303 • Web: www.do-engineering.com

Donovan Industries/Resist-A-Band . . . . . . . . .53713401 McCormick Dr., Tampa, FL 33626Phone: 813-864-5261Categories: Rehab Equipment, Strength Training EquipmentSee Ad Page 27 See Product Writeup Page 67

Dynamic Edge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5491171 W. 2400 South, Salt Lake City, UT 84119Phone: 801-975-8100 • Web: www.dynamic-edge.comCategories: Athletic Equipment/Apparel, Cardiovascular &Strength Training Equipment, Rehab Equipment

Dynatronics Corp. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1007030 Park Central Dr., Salt Lake City, UT 84121Phone: 800-874-6251 • Web: www.dynatronics.comManufactures, distributes advanced-technology medicaldevices, supplies, rehabilitation equipmentCategories: ElectrotherapySee Ad Inside Back CoverSee Product Writeups Pages 60 & 65

EBI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .938100 Interpace Pkwy., Parsippany, NJ 07054Phone: 800-526-2579 • Web: www.ebimedical.comCategories: Braces & Supports, Electrotherapy

Econoline Products . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2131800 Industrial Center Circle, Charlotte, NC 28213Phone: 800-367-8319 • Web: www.econoline.comCategories: Trainer’s Room/Sports Medicine Supplies

efi Sports Medicine/Total Gym . . . . . . . . . . .14027755 Arjons Dr., San Diego, CA 92126Phone: 800-541-4900 • Web: www.totalgym.comTotal Gym and other efi Sports Medicine Products.Categories: Cardiovascular & Strength Training Equipment,Rehab Equipment, Trainer’s Room/Sports Medicine SuppliesSee Ad Page 5 See Product Writeup Page 68

Elsevier/Saunders/Mosby . . . . . . . . . . . . . .121212121 Faulkner Dr., Owings Mills, MD 21117Phone: 800-545-2522 • Web: www.elsevier.comCategories: Educational Materials, Publishing

Em-Probe, Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .103726101 Marshall Ln. NE, Kingston, WA 98346Phone: 360-297-8736 • Web: www.em-probe.com

EMPI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .308599 Cardigan Rd., St. Paul, MN 55126Phone: 800-328-2536 • Web: www.empi.comCategories: Electrotherapy

Engo™ Performance Patches . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8471670 94th Ln. NE, Blaine, MN 55449Phone: 763-795-0057

Exertools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21731 Commercial Blvd., Ste. F, Novato, CA 94949Phone: 800-235-1559 • Web: www.exertools.comFrom gymballs to weight equipment to aqua therapy systems.Categories: Cardiovascular & Strength Training Equipment,Rehab Equipment, Functional Training EquipmentSee Ad Page 70 See Product Writeup Page 68

Extech Instruments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .112285 Bear Hill Rd., Waltham, MA 02451Phone: 781-890-7440 • Web: www.extech.com

F.A. Davis Company/Publishers . . . . . . . . . . .6211915 Arch St., Philadelphia, PA 19103Phone: 800-323-3555 • Web: www.fadavis.comCategories: Educational materials, Publisher

Fastech Labs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .225444 W. Maple Rd. #A, Troy, MI 48084Phone: 800-351-3668 • Web: www.fastechlabs.comCategories: Braces & Supports, Trainer’s Room/SportsMedicine Supplies

Ferno Performance Pools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .82270 Weil Way, Wilmington, OH 45177Phone: 800-733-3766 • Web: www.fernoperformancepools.comUnderwater treadmill systems, hot pools, cold pools, andwhirlpoolsCategories: Hot & Cold Treatment, Rehab Equipment,Trainer’s Room/Sports Medicine Supplies, Aquatic ExerciseSee Ad Page 75 See Product Writeups Page 65

First to the Finish Strength & Conditioning . . . .5361325 N. Broad, Carlinville, IL 62626Phone: 800-747-9013 • Web: www.firsttothefinish.com

Fitball USA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .32614215 Mead St., Longmont, CO 80504Phone: 800-752-2255 • Web: www.fitball.comStrength, flexibility and balance products including theFitBall® exercise ball.Categories: Cardiovascular & Strength Training Equipment,Educational Materials, Rehab Equipment, Massage ProductsSee Ad Page 76 See Product Writeup Page 67

EXHIBITOR L IST INGEXHIBITOR L IST ING

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Fitter International, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11013050-2600 Portland St. S.E., Calgary, AB T2G 4M6Phone: 800-FITTER-1 • Web: www.fitter1.comCategories: Cardivascular & Strength Training Equipment,Hot & Cold Treatment, Rehab Equipment, Trainer’sRoom/Sports Medicine Supplies

Foot Management, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7097201 Friendship Rd., Pittsville, MD 21850Phone: 410-835-3668 • Web: www.footmanagement.comCategories: Rehab EquipmentSee Ad Page 76 See Product Writeups Page 61

FSI America . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .TBD861 W. Bagley Rd., Berea, OH 44017Phone: 440-891-1523 • Web: www.fsinorth.com

GAME READY Injury Treatment System . . . . .1216929 Camelia St., Berkeley, CA 94710Phone: 888-GAMEREADY • Web: www.gameready.comGame Ready simultaneously delivers deep tissue cooling andintermittent compression.Categories: Hot & Cold TreatmentSee Ad Page 14 See Product Writeup Page 66

Gatorade Company, The . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .400555 West Monroe St., Chicago, IL 60661Phone: 800-428-6000 Web: www.gatorade.com, www.gssiweb.comThe Gatorade Performance Series of products.Categories: Educational Materials, Trainer’s Room/SportsMedicine Supplies, Nutrition, HydrationSee Product Writeups Page 66

Gebauer Company . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10069410 St. Catherine Ave., Cleveland, OH 44104Phone: 800-321-9348 • Web: www.gebauerco.comGebauer’s Instant Ice, a nonprescription, topical skin refriger-ant, relieves minor pain as fast as ice without the mess.Athletes can get back in the game faster.Categories: Hot & Cold Treatment, Trainer’s Room/SportsMedicine SuppliesSee Ad Page 17 See Product Writeups Page 66

General Physiotherapy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .44913222 Lakefront Dr., East St. Louis, MO 63045Phone: 800-237-1832 • Web: www.g5.comG5® Massage Machines for Peak Performance, InjuryPrevention, and Muscle Recovery.Categories: Cardiovascular & Strength Training Equipment,Rehab Equipment, Trainer’s Room/Sports Medicine Supplies,Massage ProductsSee Ad Page 47 See Product Writeup Page 61

Generation II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .122011818 N. Creek Pkwy. N, Bothell, WA 98011Phone: 800-462-7252 • Web: www.gen2.com

Graston Technique . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2463833 N. Meridian St., Ste. 307, Indianapolis, IN 46208Phone: 866-926-2828 • Web: www.grastontechnique.comSoft tissue mobilization technologyCategories: Rehab Equipment, Trainer’s Room/SportsMedicine Supplies, Massage ProductsSee Ad Page 53 See Product Writeup Page 61

GTM Sportswear . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .540520 McCall Rd., Manhattan, KS 66502Phone: 785-537-8822 • Web: www.gtmsportswear.com

Hapad, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8185301 Enterprise Blvd., Bethel Park, PA 15102Phone: 800-544-2723 • Web: www.hapad.comCategories: Prefab Insoles

Hartmann-Conco, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .226481 Lakeshore Pkwy., Rock Hill, SC 29730Phone: 800-243-2294 • Web: www.hartmann-conco.comCategories: Trainer’s Room/Sports Medicine Supplies

Healthcare Providers Service Organization . . .1214159 E. County Line Rd., Hatboro, PA 19040Phone: 800-982-9491 • Web: www.hpso.comCategories: Insurance

SPONSORED BY

Request No. 47 NATA Booth No. 822

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Henry Schein/MBM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .804135 Duryea Rd., Melville, NY 11747Phone: 800-972-2611 • Web: www.henryschein.comCategories: Braces & Supports, Cardiovascular & StrengthTraining Equipment, Educational Materials, Electrotherapy,Hot & Cold Treatment, Rehab Equipment, Trainer’sRoom/Sports Medicine Supplies, Massage Products

HQ, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .346210 9th St. W., Palmetto, FL 34221Phone: 941-721-7588 • Web: www.hqinc.net

Human Kinetics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .720P.O. Box 5076, Champaign, IL 61825-5076Phone: 800-747-4457 • Web: www.HumanKinetics.com Human Kinetics is a sports and fitness publishing company.Categories: Educational MaterialsSee Ad Pages 28 & 88 See Product Writeups Page 69

Hurst Enterprise . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1137P.O. Box 5, Newburgh , IN 47629-0005Phone: 812-853-0901 • Web: www.hurstenterprise.comCategories: Athletic Equipment/Apparel, Cooling Systems,Cooling Apparel, Tents/Awnings

HydroWorx International, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . .3321961 Fulling Mill Rd., Middletown, PA 17057Phone: 717-985-1723 • Web: www.hydroworx.comCategories: Rehab Equipment

Hygenic Corporation/Thera-Band Products . . .12011245 Home Ave., Akron, OH 44310Phone: 800-321-2135 • Web: www.thera-band.comCategories: Athletic Equipment/Apparel, Rehab Equipment,Exercise Bands and Balls

Ideal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9271287 County Rd. 623, Broseley, MO 63932Phone: 800-321-5490 • Web: www.ideal-stuff.comCategories: Cardiovascular & Strength Training Equipment,Electrotherapy, Rehab Equipment, Trainer’s Room/SportsMedicine Supplies

ImPACT Applications, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .542P.O. Box 23288, Hilton Head, SC 29925Phone: 877-646-7991 • Web: www.impacttest.comCategories: Concussion Management

Impact Innovative Products, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . .6342 Penn St., Manor, PA 15665Phone: 724-864-8440 • Web: www.zoombang.comCategories: Athletic Equipment/Apparel, Braces & Supports,Trainer’s Room/Sports Medicine Supplies, Protective Pads &Gloves

Impulse Training Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .749P.O. Box 2312, Newnan, GA 30264Phone: 800-964-2362 • Web: www.impulsepower.comCategories: Rehab Equipment, Trainer’s Room/SportsMedicine Supplies

InjuryZone . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1042385 Place D’Youville, 4th Floor, Montreal, PQ H2Y 2B7Phone: 514-343-0030 • Web: www.injuryzone.com

Innovation Sports, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .71419762 Pauling, Foothill Ranch, CA 92610Phone: 800-222-4284 • Web: www.isports.comCategories: Braces & Supports, Hot & Cold Treatment,Rehab Equipment

Innovative Sports Training, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . .2243711 N. Ravenswood, Ste. 150, Chicago, IL 60613Phone: 773-244-6470 • Web: www.innsport.comCategories: Rehab Equipment

International Academy of Orthopedic Medicine .841P.O. Box 86177, Tucson, AZ 85754Phone: 520-318-4266 • Web: www.iaom-us.com

IOMED, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4352441 S. 3850 W., Ste. A, Salt Lake City, UT 84120Phone: 800-621-3347 • Web: www.iomed.comIOMED is the iontophoresis technology leader with the broad-est range of products.Categories: ElectrotherapySee Ad Page 41 See Product Writeups Page 64

Jaybird & Mais, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .618360 Merrimack St., Lawrence, MA 01843-1740Phone: 978-686-8659 • Web: www.jaybird.comCategories: Trainer’s Room/Sports Medicine Supplies, Athletic Tape

EXHIBITOR L IST INGEXHIBITOR L IST ING

NATA Booth No. 709 Request No. 48

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Johnson & Johnson Sports Medicine . . . . . . . .501199 Grandview Rd., Skillman, NJ 08558Phone: 800-219-6344 • Web: www.jnj.comCategories: Trainer’s Room/Sports Medicine Supplies,Athletic Tape

Jones & Bartlett Publishers, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . .920409 Tall Pine Dr., Sudbury, MA 01776Phone: 978-443-5000 • Web: www.jbpub.comCategories: Educational Materials

JT Enterprises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .348P.O. Box 1213, Lockport, NY 14095Phone: 800-452-0631

K&K Insurance Group, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .827P.O. Box 2338, Fort Wayne, IN 46801Phone: 800-441-3994 • Web: www.kandkinsurance.comCategories: Insurance

Kelly Kinetics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11201413 41st St. S., Great Falls, MT 59405Phone: 888-645-3559 • Web: www.kellykinetics.comInnovative rehabilitative and massage therapy products.Categories: Rehab Equipment, Trainer’s Room/SportsMedicine Supplies, Massage ProductsSee Insert Page 51 See Product Writeups Page 61

Kinesio USA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9193939 San Pedro Dr. N.E., Albuquerque, NM 87110Phone: 505-856-2029 • Web: www.kinesiotaping.comCategories: Educational Materials, Trainer’s Room/SportsMedicine Supplies, Athletic Tape

Laser Therapeutic Technology, Inc. . . . . . . . . . .64877 Main Ave., Ste. 103, Ocean Grove, NJ 07756Phone: 800-235-3540Categories: Trainer’s Room/Sports Medicine Supplies, LaserTherapySee Ad Page 83

Lasky & Associates Prepaid Legal Services, Inc. 8398800 Thunderbird Dr., Pensacola, FL 32514Phone: 850-501-8889

Life Fitness/Hammer Strength . . . . . . . . . . .120010601 W. Belmont Ave., Franklin Park, IL 60131Phone: 800-634-8637 • Web: www.lifefitness.comLife Fitness is the global leader in designing and manufactur-ing a full line of cardiovascular & strength training equipment.Categories: Cardiovascular & Strength Training EquipmentSee Product Writeup Page 68

Lippincott Williams & Wilkins . . . . . . . . . . . .1024530 Walnut St., Philadelphia, PA 19106Phone: 800-638-3030 • Web: www.lww.comPublishers of books, journals and electronic media for athletictrainersCategories: Educational MaterialsSee Ad Page 31 See Product Writeups Page 69

Lohmann & Rauscher, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1110P.O. Box 19007, Topeka, KS 66619Phone: 785-862-1100 • Web: www.lohmann-rauscher.comCategories: Braces & Supports

M-F Athletic Company . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1105P.O. Box 8090, 11 Amflex Dr., Cranston, RI 02920-0090Phone: 800-556-7464 • Web: www.performbetter.comA complete catalog of functional training and rehabilitationequipmentCategories: Athletic Equipment/Apparel, Cardiovascular &Strength Training Equipment, Educational Materials, RehabEquipmentSee Ad Pages 15 & 115 See Product Writeup Page 68

Magister Corp. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1302PO Box 4323, Chattanooga, TN 37405Phone: 423-265-3574 • Web: www.magistercorp.comCategories: Cardiovascular & Strength Training Equipment

Magnatherm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5483939 Broadway, Kansas City, MO 64111Phone: 816-931-5358 • Web: www.magnatherm.comCategories: Electrotherapy

Mannix Instrument . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .440PO Box 866, Lynbrook, NY 11563Phone: 516-887-7979 • Web: www.mannix-inst.comCategories: Testing and Measurement Units

A T H L E T I C B I D . C O M ◆ T&C M A Y / J U N E 2 0 0 4 ◆ 77

SPONSORED BY

Want better outcomes and accelerated results?

David Tumbas, ATC,Head Athletic Trainer,

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Rick Burkholdt, ATC,Head Athletic Trainer,Philadelphia Eagles

Accelerated Care Plus would like to thank all the Athletic Trainerswho help make our therapy modalities the best in the industry!

Call us today to learn more

(800) 350-1100

Accelerated Care PlusNew ideas for healthcare

958 Spice Islands DriveSparks, NV 89431

(775) 685-4000 Fax (775) 685 4013www.acplus.com

© 2003, Accelerated Care Plus, Corp.

Scott Green, ATC,Head Athletic Trainer

Atlanta Thrashers

Pat Karns, ATC,Head Athletic TrainerColorado Avalanche

Troy Wenzel, ATC,Head Athletic Trainer,

Milwaukee Bucs

John Norwig, ATC,Head Athletic Trainer,

Pittsburgh Steelers

Al Shuford, ATC,Athletic Trainer,

Team Chip Gnassi Racing

Ray Barile, ATC,Head Athletic Trainer

St. Louis BluesPresident, PHATS

Omnisound 3000 Omnistim 500 Omnistim FX Pro Neuroprobe 500 Megapulse II2 R RRRR

Request No. 49 NATA Booth No. 1224

Page 80: Training & Conditioning 14.4

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Marsh Affinity Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3121440 Renaissance Dr., Park Ridge, IL 60068-1400Phone: 800-503-9230 • Web: www.seaburychicago.comCategories: Insurance

McDavid Sports Medical Products . . . . . . . . .100010305 Argonne Dr., Woodridge, IL 60517Phone: 800-237-8254 • Web: www.mcdavidinc.comTop quality braces and supports for all levels of competitionCategories: Athletic Equipment/Apparel, Braces & Supports,Hot & Cold Treatment, Trainer’s Room/Sports MedicineSuppliesSee Ad Page 29 See Product Writeups Page 63

McGraw-Hill Companies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .715P.O. Box 182605, Columbus, OH 43218Phone: 877-833-5524 • Web: www.mcgraw-hill.comCategories: Educational Materials

McKenzie Institute, The . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .922126 N. Salina St., Syracuse, NY 13202Phone: 800-635-8380 • Web: www.mckenziemdt.orgCategories: Educational Materials

Med Spec . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3234600-K Lebanon Rd., Charlotte, NC 28227Phone: 800-582-4040 • Web: www.medspec.comSports medicine and orthopedic softgoods.Categories: Athletic Equipment/Apparel, Braces & Supports,Rehab Equipment, Trainer’s Room/Sports Medicine SuppliesSee Ad Page 79 See Product Writeups Page 63

Med Sports Systems, Ltd. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5446461 Pleasant River Dr., Dimondale, MI 48821Phone: 877-646-7990 • Web: www.sportssystems.comCategories: Trainer’s Room/Sports Medicine Supplies

Medco Sports Medicine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .708500 Fillmore Ave., Tonawanda, NY 14150Phone: 800-556-3326 • Web: www.medco-athletics.comCategories: Braces & Supports, Hot & Cold Treatment,Rehab Equipment, Trainer’s Room/Sports Medicine Supplies

Medtronic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20911811 Willows Rd, NE, Redmond, WA 98073Phone: 800-442-1142 • Web: www.physio-control.comCategories: Trainer’s Room/Sports Medicine Supplies

MedX Health . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2403535 Laird Rd., Unit 2, Mississauga, ON L5L-5Y7Phone: 888-363-3112 • Web: www.medxhealth.comMedX Phototherapy provides solutions to reduce pain andaccelerate healingCategories: Trainer’s Room/Sports Medicine Supplies, Lightand Laser Therapy EquipmentSee Ad Pages 24 & 25 See Product Writeup Page 65

MedZone Corporation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .828PO Box 2068, Sun City, AZ 85372Phone: 866-MEDZONE • Web: www.medzonecorp.comTopical otc products for muscle injuries, joint pain, wounds,massage, psoriasis, and anti-chafingCategories: Hot & Cold Treatment, Trainer’s Room/SportsMedicine Supplies, Massage ProductsSee Ad Page 100 See Product Writeup Page 61

Mettler Electronics Corp. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11001333 Claudina St., Anaheim, CA 92805Phone: 800-854-9305 • Web: www.mettlerelectronics.comCategories: Electrotherapy, Hot & Cold Treatment, RehabEquipment

Mission Pharmacal Co. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1300PO Box 786099, San Antonio, TX 78278-6099Phone: 800-531-3333Categories: Trainer’s Room/Sports Medicine Supplies,Nutrition

MS Plastics, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .112710 Park Place Bldg. 2, #1A2, Butler, NJ 07405Phone: 800-593-1802 • Web: www.mspsupply.comCategories: Hot & Cold Treatment, Trainer’s Room/SportsMedicine Supplies

Mueller Sports Medicine, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . .626One Quench Dr., PO Box 199, Prairie du Sac, WI 53578Phone: 800-356-9522 • Web: www.muellersportsmed.comComplete sports medicine supplies, tapes, braces and supports.Categories: Braces & Supports, Hot & Cold Treatment,Trainer’s Room/Sports Medicine SuppliesSee Ad Page 7 See Product Writeups Pages 67 & 71

NACDA Insurance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5192455 E. Parley’s Way, Ste. 210, Salt Lake City, UT 84109Phone: 801-412-2622 • Web: www.nacda.comCategories: Insurance

National Academy of Sports Medicine . . . . . . .20026632 Agoura Rd., Calabasas, CA 91302Phone: 800-460-NASM • Web: www.nasm.orgNASM is the international leader for sports performance edu-cation and certification.Categories: Educational MaterialsSee Ad Page 38 See Product Writeups Pages 69 & 71

National Center for Drug Free Sports, Inc., The .327810 Baltimore #200, Kansas City, MO 64105Phone: 816-474-8655 • Web: www.drugfreesport.com

Nat’l Center for Sports Safety . . .member svc. area1222 14th Ave. South, Ste. 201, Birmingham, AL 35205Phone: 205-930-7154

National Coalition for Promoting Physical Activity14181010 Massachusetts Ave., NW, #350, Washington, DC 20001Phone: 202-454-7544 • Web: www.ncppa.org

National Medical Alliance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .112312415 N. Old Meridian, Carmel, IN 46032Phone: 800-662-7283 • Web: www.nmadirect.comCategories: Athletic Equipment/Apparel, Braces & Supports,Hot & Cold Treatment, Rehab Equipment

National Strength and Conditioning Association .3181955 N. Union Blvd., Colorado Springs, CO 80909-2229Phone: 719-632-6722 • Web: www.nsca-lift.orgCategories: Educational Materials, Insurance, Strength &Conditioning ResearchSee Ad Pages 26 & 106 See Product Writeups Page 70

Nautilus/Bowflex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1886 Prairie Way, Louisville, CO 80027Phone: 303-545-1601 • Web: www.bowflex.comCategories: Cardiovascular & Strength Training Equipment

Neo-Tone . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1145175 Soto Street, Vernon, CA 90058Phone: 323-584-3678

New Option Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11136718 Oakbrook Blvd., Dallas, TX 75235Phone: 800-872-5488 • Web: www.newoptions-sports.comCategories: Braces & Supports

Newkirk International, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .644PO Box 1006, Latham, NY 12110Phone: 518-639-5475 • Web: www.newkirkinternational.com

NSCA Certification Commission . . . . . . . . . . .3183333 Landmark Circle, Lincoln, NE 68504Phone: 888-746-2378 • Web: www.nsca-cc.orgCertified Strength and Conditioning Specialist and NSCACertified Personal Trainer CertificationsCategories: Educational Materials, CertificationSee Ad Page 95 See Product Writeups Page 69

Nutramax Products, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .730985 Pleasant View Court, Gardnerville, NV 89460Phone: 775-265-0100

Nutrition Education Services, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . .349PO Box 333, West Chester, PA 19381Phone: 800-692-5579 • Web: www.eattocompete.comCategories: Nutrition

O-Pro Mouthguards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .513315 Main St., Olean, NY 14760Phone: 888-836-9751 • Web: www.opro.com

Oakworks, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1314P.O. Box 238, Shrewsbury, PA 17361-0238Phone: 800-558-8850 x2236 • Web: www.oakworks.comWorld-class Portable and Stationary treatment tables for all sports!Categories: Athetic Equipment/Apparel, Rehab Equipment,Trainer’s Room/Sports Medicine Supplies, Massage ProductsSee Ad Back Cover See Product Writeups Page 61

Olympic Case Co. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4322604-0 Tampa East Blvd., Tampa, FL 33619Phone: 888-246-5525 • Web: www.olycase.comCategories: Traveling Trunks and Cases

OPTP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8253700 Annapolis Lane Ste. 175, PO Box 47009, Minneapolis, MN 55447Phone: 800-819-0121 • Web: www.optp.comMcKenzie products, rehab and athletic equipment, education-al materialsCategories: Athletic Equipment/Apparel, Cardiovascular &Strength Training Equipment, Educational Materials, RehabEquipmentSee Ad Page 87 See Product Writeups Page 68

Orthometrix, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .438106 Corporate Park Dr., Ste. 1062, White Plains, NY 10604Phone: 877-249-4229 • Web: www.orthometrix.netCategories: Cardiovascular & Strength Training Equipment,Rehab Equipment

Parker Laboratories, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .546286 Eldridge Rd., Fairfield, NJ 07004Phone: 973-276-9500 • Web: www.parkerlabs.comCategories: Trainer’s Room/Sports Medicine Supplies

Performance Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .213P.O Box 3454, Mooresville, NC 28117-3454Phone: 704-202-0416 • Web: www.perf-analysis.com

Perry Dynamics, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3332810 N. Jasper St., Decatur, IL 62526Phone: 217-872-1530 • Web: www.perrydynamics.comCategories: Cardiovascular & Strength Training Equipment

EXHIBITOR L IST INGEXHIBITOR L IST ING

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Phi-Ten USA, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9351860 W. Carson St. Ste 101, Torrance, CA 90501Phone: 310-328-0319 • Web: www.phitenusa.com

Philips Medical Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2143000 Minuteman Road, Andover, MA 01810Phone: 978-687-1501 • Web: www.medical.philips.comCategories: Electrotherapy, Trainer’s Room

PI Professional Therapy Products . . . . . . . . . .921PO Box 1067, Athens, TN 37371-1067Phone: 888-818-9632 • Web: www.pi-ptp.comCategories: Cardiovascular & Strength Training Equipment,Hot & Cold Treatment

Pneumex, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12053115 N. Boyer Ave., Sandpoint, ID 83864Phone: 208-265-4105 • Web: www.pneumex.comCategories: Cardiovascular & Strength Training Equipment,Rehab Equipment

Podo Technology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .931750 Hammond Dr. Bldg. 2, Ste. 310, Atlanta, GA 30328Phone: 678-990-1881 • Web: www.podotechnology.com

Power Systems, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9232527 Westcott Blvd., Knoxville, TN 37931Phone: 800-321-6975 • Web: www.power-systems.comCategories: Cardiovascular & Strength Training Equipment,Rehab Equipment, Massage Products, Fitness/BalanceSee Product Writeup Page 68

Powerhouse Pilates, LLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .735442 West Main St., Monongahela, PA 15063Phone: 877-716-4879 • Web: www.phpilates.comCategories: Education Materials, Educational Programs

Powering Athletics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11366134 Eagle Creek Drive, Fort Wayne, IN 46814Phone: 260-672-1700 • Web: www.poweringathletics.comCategories: Cardiovascular Equipment, Plyometric TrainingEquipmentSee Ad Page 20

Premier Software, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2088510 NW 72nd St., Pty 600, Miami, FL 33166Phone: 630-906-6630 • Web: www.simtrak.comInjury tracking software for athletic trainers, rehabilitationprofessionals, and physiotherapists.Categories: Injury Tracking Computer SoftwareSee Ad Page 70 See Product Writeup Page 61

PrePak Products . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10254055 Oceanside Blvd., Ste. L, Oceanside, CA 92056-5821Phone: 800-544-7257 • Web: www.prepakproducts.comPrePak Products manufactures low cost, high quality exer-cise/rehab equipment.Categories: Rehab Equipment, Massage ProductsSee Ad Page 89 See Product Writeup Page 62

PRO Orthopedic Devices, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . .7012884 E. Ganley Rd., Tucson, AZ 85706Phone: 800-523-5611 • Web: www.proorthopedic.come-mail: [email protected] supports, braces and sleeves, cold therapy and turfprotection.Categories: Braces & Supports, Hot & Cold Treatment,Trainer’s Room/Sports Medicine Supplies, Magnetic TherapySee Ad Page 80

Pro-Tec Athletics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3212735 152nd Ave. NE, Redmond, WA 98052Phone: 800-779-3372 • Web: www.injurybegone.come-mail: [email protected] and comfortable sports medicine supports and podi-atric product.Categories: Braces & Supports, Rehab Equipment, Trainer’sRoom/Sports Medicine SuppliesSee Ad Page 50 See Product Writeups Page 63

Procter & Gamble . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6082 Procter & Gamble Plaza, Cincinnati, OH 45202Phone: 513-983-269 • Web: www.pg.comCategories: Trainer’s Room/Sports Medicine Supplies

Professional Products, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .102154 Hugh Adams Dr., DeFuniak Springs, FL 32435Phone: 850-892-5731 • Web: www.ezywrap.come-mail: [email protected]: Braces & Supports, Hot & Cold TreatmentRehab Equipment, Orthopedic Softgoods

A T H L E T I C B I D . C O M ◆ T&C M A Y / J U N E 2 0 0 4 ◆ 79

SPONSORED BY

Request No. 50 NATA Booth No. 323

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PROTEAM by Hausmann . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1107130 Union St., Northvale, NJ 07647Phone: 888-428-7626, 201-767-0255Web: www.proteamtables.com • e-mail: [email protected] taping stations, Whirlpool tables, custom lockers andtreatment furniture for athletic trainersCategories: Rehab Equipment, Trainer’s Room/SportsMedicine Supplies, Taping Stations and Split Leg Lift TablesSee Ad Inside Front Cover See Product Writeups Page 62

Quest Technologies, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12041060 Corporate Center Dr., Oconomowoc, WI 53066Phone: 262-567-9157 • Web: www.quest-technologies.comHeat stress monitorsCategories: Trainer’s Room/Sports Medicine SuppliesSee Ad Page 46 See Product Writeup Page 62

Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy Syndrome Assoc. (RSDSA)337PO Box 502 Wilford, CT 06460Phone: 203-877-3790Web: www.rsds.org • e-mail: [email protected]

Renfrew Athletics/Scapa North America . . . .1106111 Great Pond Dr., Windsor, CT 06095Phone: 860-688-8000 • Web: www.renfrewathletics.come-mail: [email protected]: Athletic Equipment/Apparel, Trainer’sRoom/Sports Medicine Supplies

RG Medical Diagnostics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .63521130 Bridge St., Southfield, MI 48034Phone: 888-596-9498 • Web: www.rgmed.com

Rich-Mar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .61415499 E. 590th Rd., Inola, OK 74036Phone: 800-762-4665, 918-543-2222 • Web: www.richmarweb.come-mail: [email protected] HANDS-FREE Ultrasound & Stim Combo with Light TherapyCategories: Educational Materials, ElectrotherapySee Ad Page 36 See Product Writeups Page 65

Rocky Mountain University of Health Professions12061662 W. 820 N. Provo, UT, (84603) 84601Phone: 801-375-5125 • Web: www.rmuohp.edue-mail: [email protected]: Educational Materials

RottaPharmaceuticals, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2431340 Campus Parkway, Wall, NJ 07753Phone: 732-751-9020 • Web: www.rotta.come-mail: [email protected]

S&W by Hausmann . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1107130 Union St., Northvale, NJ 07647Phone: 888-428-7626, 201-767-0255Web: www.s-wenterprises.com • e-mail: [email protected]: Rehab Equipment, Trainer’s Room/Sports MedicineSupplies, Massage Products, Whirlpool Tables, Taping Stations

Sam Products . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4474904 So. Coast Hwy., Ste. 245, Newport, OR 97365Phone: 800-818-4726 • Web: www.samsplint.come-mail: [email protected]

Sammons Preston Rolyan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14084 Sammons Ct., Bolingbrook, IL 60440Phone: 630-226-1300 • Web: www.sammonsprestonrolyan.come-mail: [email protected]: Rehab Equipment

Saunders Group, Inc., The . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5224250 Noyex Dr., Chaska, MN 55318Phone: 800-456-1289 • Web: www.TheSaundersGroup.come-mail: [email protected]: Braces & Supports, Educational Materials, Hot &Cold Treatment, Rehab Equipment, Magnetic Therapy

SC3, LLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .238P.O. Box 980, Madison, MS 39130Phone: 601-853-3690 • Web: www.shaverschoice.come-mail: [email protected]: Shaving System

Schering-Plough Healthcare Products . . . . . . .509PO Box 377, Memphis, TN 38151Phone: 908-679-1640 • Web: www.drscholls.comCategories: Trainer’s Room/Sports Medicine Supplies

Schutt Sports Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4461200 East Union, Litchfield, IL 62056-0426Phone: 800-637-2047, 800-426-9784, 217-324-2712 x2140Web: www.schutt-sports.comCategories: Athletic Equipment/Apparel

EXHIBITOR L IST INGEXHIBITOR L IST ING

Secure FootingValue Pricing

Designed to fit either rightor left foot, the PRO 610Arizona Ankle Brace isconstructed of heavy duty nylon for a low-profile, durable and lightweight brace. Two straps encirclethe foot in a figure eightpattern providing easilyadjustable lateral and medialsupport. A neoprene tongueprovides a comfortable padunder the laces. Used bythousands of athletes from the pro's to high school, this low-profile brace will notchange your shoe size. All for $14.95.

To order, or for more information, call PRO at1-800-523-5611.

NATA Booth No. 701 Request No. 51 Request No. 52

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SeliCor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3397000 N. Mopac, 2nd Floor, Austin, TX 78731Phone: 512-514-6649 • Web: www.selicor.com

Seneca Medical, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .102685 Shaffer Park Dr., Tiffin, OH 44883Phone: 800-447-0225Categories: Trainer’s Room/Sports Medicine Supplies

Shock Doctor, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6363405 Annapolis Lane, Ste. 200, Plymouth, MN 55447Phone: 763-253-1310 • Web: www.shockdoc.com

Shuttle Systems by Contemporary Design . . . .422PO Box 5089, 10005 Mt. Baker Hwy., Glacier, WA 98244-5089Phone: 800-334-5633, 360-599-2833Web: www.shuttlesystems.com • e-mail: [email protected]: Cardiovascular & Strength Training Equipment,Rehab Equipment, Plyometric Training EquipmentSee Ad Page 32 See Product Writeups Page 67

SLACK, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11156900 Grove Rd., Thorofare, NJ 08086Phone: 856-848-1000, 800-257-8290 • Web: www.SLACKbooks.comCategories: Educational Materials

Sole Custom Footbeds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .247C4-416 Meridian Rd. SE, Calgary, AB T2Z 1X2Phone: 403-204-0908 • Web: www.itsyoursole.come-mail: [email protected]

SpectraBrace . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .102211802 Brinley Ave., Louisville, KY 40243Phone: 800-738-8045

Spenco Medical Corp. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1010PO Box 2501Waco, TX, 76702Phone: 800-877-3626 • Web: www.spenco.come-mail: [email protected]: Braces & Supports, Trainer’s Room/SportsMedicine Supplies, Magnetic Therapy

Sport Tapes, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .81435 Crosby Rd., Dover, NH 03820Phone: 800-752-4944 • Web: www.tape-o.come-mail: [email protected]: Trainer’s RoomSports Medicine Supplies

SportPharm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .221381 Van Ness Ave., Suite 1507, Torrance, CA 90501Phone: 800-272-4767 • Web: www.sportpharm.come-mail: [email protected]

Sports Cool/Collegite Pacific . . . . . . . . . . . . .14018801 FM 620 #1713, Austin, TX 78726Phone: 512-731-9100

Sports Health . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .208865 Muirfield Dr., Hanover Park, IL 60133Phone: 800-323-1305 • Web: www.esportshealth.come-mail: [email protected]: Braces & Supports, Electrotherapy, RehabEquipment, Trainer’s Room/Sports Medicine Supplies

Sports Medicine Concepts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1018PO Box 173, Geneseo, NY 14454Phone: 585-346-0240 • Web: www.sportsmedicineconcepts.come-mail: [email protected]: Consulting

Sports Medicine Technologies . . . . . . . . . . . .10202011 E. Renee Dr., Phoenix, AZ 85024Phone: 800-279-1479, 602-971-4353Web: www.sportsmedtechnologies.come-mail: [email protected]: Educational Materials, Rehab Equipment

SportsMedic, Inc./MedPac . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .420828 1st St. NW, Mason City, IA 50401Phone: 800-414-9031, 641-421-7700Web: www.medicalbags.com • e-mail: [email protected]: Trainer’s Room/Sports Medicine Supplies

Stromgren Supports, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .913PO Box 1230, Hays, KS 67601Phone: 800-527-1988 • Web: www.stromgrendealer.come-mail: [email protected]: Braces & Supports, Hot & Cold Treatment,Trainer’s Room/Sports Medicine Supplies, CompressionShorts/TopsSee Ad Page 82 See Product Writeups Page 63

Summit America Insurance . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11175001 College Blvd., #216, Leawood, KS 66211Phone: 913-327-0200 • Web: www.summitamerica-ins.comCategories: Insurance

A T H L E T I C B I D . C O M ◆ T&C M A Y / J U N E 2 0 0 4 ◆ 81

SPONSORED BY

Tarsal Lok®

Stirrup Brace with Built-In StabilizerU.S. Patent# 5,741,222

Support of a Rigid... Comfort of a Lace-up.

• High Impact Fortilene stabilizer molds to the shape of anklesimply from your own body heat

• Patented stabilizer design helps control the midtarsal joint• Speed lacer system assures fast and easy application• Low profile design fits easily and comfortably

in almost any style of shoe

Inner Lok 8®

Internal Figure-Eight Strap BraceU.S. Patent# 6,398,750/6,652,474

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Request No. 53 NATA Booth No. 514

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Swede-O, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5146459 Ash St., North Branch, MN 55056Phone: 800-525-9339, 651-674-830Web: www.swedeo.com • e-mail: [email protected] Thermoskin Thermal Supports and also featuringinnovative ankle brace designs.Categories: Braces & SupportsSee Ad Page 81 See Product Writeups Page 63

SwimEx Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1310373 Market St., Warren, RI 02885Phone: 800-877-7946 • Web: www.swimex.comSwimEx is a premier provider of aquatic therapy pools withadjustable resistance, colored workstations and multipledepths, and the new SwimEx SPT Aquatic Treadmill.Categories: Cardiovascular & Strength Training Equipment,Rehab Equipment, Aquatic Therapy, HydrotherapySee Ad Page 16 See Product Writeups Page 65

Talley Medical . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7334740 Jadestone Dr., Williamston, MI 48895Phone: 517-655-9682 • Web: www.talleymedical.come-mail: [email protected]

Tanita Corp. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8262625 S. Clearbrook Dr., Arlington Heights, IL 60005-4625Phone: 847-640-9241, 877-6-TANITAWeb: www.tanita.com • e-mail: [email protected]: Atheltic Equipment/Apparel, Rehab Equipment,Trainer’s Room/Sports Medicine Supplies

TekScan, Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .946307 West First St., South Boston, MA 02127Phone: 617-464-4500

The Skier’s Edge Company . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .549PO Box 2700Park City, UT 844060Phone: 801-975-8100 • Web: www.skiersedge.come-mail: [email protected]: Rehab Equipment

The Stick/RPI of Atlanta . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .534120 Interstate North, Parkway East, Ste 424, Atlanta, GA 30339Phone: 888-882-0750 • Web: www.thestick.come-mail: [email protected]: Cardiovascular & Strength Training Equipment,Rehab Equipment, Trainer’s Room/Sports Medicine Supplies,Massage Products

Therion Research, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34248 Drexel Drive, Bay Shore, NY 11706Phone: 631-231-3100 • Web: www.therionresearch.com

Thermo-Electric Co. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .832455 Rte. 30 Imperial, PA 15126Phone: 724-695-1890Categories: Rehab Equipment

ThermoTek, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9471454 Halsey Way, Carrollton, TX 75007Phone: 972-242-3232 • Web: www.prothermo.come-mail: [email protected] delivers heat, cold, contrast and compression - without ice.Categories: Electrotherapy, Hot & Cold Treatment, RehabEquipment, Trainer’s Room/Sports Medicine SuppliesSee Ad Page 48 See Product Writeup Page 67

Thomson Delmar Learning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2185 Maxwell Dr., Clifton Park, NY 12065Phone: 800-347-7707, 518-348-2453Web: www.delmarhealthcare.com • e-mail: [email protected]

Townsend Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3144615 Shepard St., Bakersfield, CA 93313-2339Phone: 800-840-2772, 661-837-1795Web: www.townsenddesign.come-mail: [email protected] and genuine custom functional knee braces; customelbow bracesCategories: Braces & SupportsSee Ad Page 55 See Product Writeups Pages 64 & 71

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Page 85: Training & Conditioning 14.4

Training & Conditioning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9242488 N.Triphammer Rd., Ithaca, NY 14850Phone: 607-257-6970 • Fax: 607-257-7328Web: www.athleticsearch.com, www.athleticbid.comMark Goldberg, Sheryl Shaffer, Diedra HarkenriderThe only trade magazine serving athletic trainers and profes-sionals who work on the treatment/prevention of injuries andthe conditioning of competitive athletes.Categories: Educational Materials

Tyco Healthcare/KENDALL . . . . . . . . . . . . . .101415 Hampshire St., Mansfield, MA 02048Phone: 800-962-9888 • Web: www.kendallhq.comCategories: Trainer’s Room/Sports Medicine SuppliesWound Care Products and Athletic Tapes

Ultra Athletic, LLC/APG Technology . . . . . . . . .4308470 Allison Pointe Blvd. #100, Indianapolis, IN 46250Phone: 317-713-2910 • Web: www.ultraankle.comCategories: Braces & Support

Under Armour Performance Apparel . . . . . . . . .9321020 Hull St. , Baltimore, MD 21230Phone: 888-4 ARMOUR • Web: www.underarmour.comCategories: Athletic Equipment/Apparel

UniCam, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .92823-27 Bland St., Emerson, NJ 07630Phone: 201-262-1919, 866-698-6422Web: www.uni-cam.com • e-mail: [email protected]: Cardiovascular & Strength Training Equipment,Rehab Equipment

Uri Dynamics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5416786 Hawthorn Park Dr., Indianapolis, IN 46220Phone: 317-915-7896

Velcro USA, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .110406 Brown Ave., Manchester, NH 03103Phone: 800-225-0180

Vidmar Dist., Inc. MBE/WBE . . . . . . . . . . . .1044426 West Market St., York, PA 17404Phone: 717-699-4664, 866-363-3031Web: www.vidmardistributors.come-mail: [email protected]

Welch Allyn, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5384341 State Street Rd., Skaneateles Falls, NY 13153Phone: 315-685-2691 Web: www.welchallyn.com

Whitehall Manufacturing, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . .1009PO Box 3527City of Industry, CA 91744-0527Phone: 800-782-7706, 626-968-6681Web: www.whitehallmfg.com • e-mail:[email protected] and hot & cold therapy.Categories: Hot & Cold Treatment, Rehab EquipmentSee Ad Page 73 See Product Writeups Page 67

Williams Sports Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7501275 County Rd. 210 W., Jacksonville, FL 32259Phone: 904-826-1503

Wilson Case, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .515PO Box 1106 , Hastings, NE 68902-1106Phone: 800-322-5493 • Web: www.wilsoncase.come-mail: [email protected]: Athletic Equipment/Apparel, Trainer’sRoom/Sports Medicine Supplies, Cases

Wisstech Enterprises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1226PO Box 1002 Sugar Land, TX 77487Phone: 800-809-8184 • Web: www.wisstechenterprises.come-mail: [email protected]: Trainer’s Room/Sports Medicine Supplies

Wrymark, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .91511833 Westline Industrial Dr., St. Louis, MO 63146-3312Phone: 800-969-3668 • Web: www.wrymark.comCategories: Trainer’s Room/Sports Medicine Supplies

Xtreme-Comfort Zone Research/SkyScan . . . . .7348003 Apple Six Dr., Port Richey, FL 34654Phone: 727-847-1958 • Web: www.comfortzonefans.comCategories: Cooling Systems

Z-Flo Motion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .103067 Federal Ave., Quincy, MA 02169Phone: 617-890-1045 • Web: www.zflomotion.come-mail: [email protected]

A T H L E T I C B I D . C O M ◆ T&C M A Y / J U N E 2 0 0 4 ◆ 83

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84 ◆ T&C M A Y / J U N E 2 0 0 4 ◆ A T H L E T I C B I D . C O M

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Oakworks® provides physical therapy, rehab andathletic training equipment including physical thera-py tables, treatment chairs, taping tables, portabletaping tables and both stationary and portabletreatment tables for physical therapists and AthleticTrainers.

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Our portable physical therapy tables are availablewith both wood and aluminum understructures andcapable of handling heavy-duty workloads as wellas the demands of travel and small storage spaces.

Our taping tables are height adjustable to ergonom-ically accommodate Athletic Trainers of every size.Oakworks® own portable taping table is designedfor easy storage and portable convenience. Take iton the road, to another training room, even take itout to the playing field. You'll be hard pressed tofind a portable taping table anywhere else.

Oakworks® also provides two models of electric lifttreatment tables for the optimum in adjustable con-venience for physical therapists and AthleticTrainers. Fast, effortless height adjustments on theselift tables maximize efficiency, ergonomics and bodymechanics for therapists, patients, trainers and ath-letes alike.

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Over the past 85 years, athletic training and CramerProducts have progressed side by side. Clear visionand a sensible approach to the needs of the physi-cally active are common qualities shared by themen and women of Cramer Products and the thou-sands of dedicated professionals who serve asAthletic Trainers and Sports Medicine Clinicians.

The Cramer approach of hard work and a tirelessallegiance to athletic training has led to the intro-duction of numerous product innovations—fromstate-of-the-art braces and supports, to the introduc-tion of the first electrolyte replacement sport drink,and the recent introductions of the Cramer Stay CoolTowel® and the ProShox® Mouthguard.

Cramer’s approach is straightforward and simple: acommitment to support athletically active individualswith proven treatments. Perhaps that’s why Cramerremains the most trusted name in training roomsthe world over.

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Page 87: Training & Conditioning 14.4

Request No. 57 NATA Booth No. 201

Page 88: Training & Conditioning 14.4

The National Strength andConditioning Association (NSCA), theworldwide authority on strength train-ing and athletic conditioning, will con-duct its 27th Annual NationalConference July 14-17, 2004 inMinneapolis, MN. This premierstrength and conditioning eventattracts nearly 2,000 professionals fromaround the world.

The convention is designed to benefitstrength coaches, physical therapists,nutritionists, sport coaches, personaltrainers, educators, students, andresearchers interested in learning newconcepts, expanding their level ofknowledge, or building relationshipsand networking with others in thefield.

Spinal Biomechanist Dr. Stuart M.McGill will present the KeynoteAddress. Dr. McGill, Professor andChair of the Department ofKinesiology at the University ofWaterloo in Ontario, Canada, hasauthored over 200 scientific publica-tions that address the issues of lower

back function, prevention and rehabili-tation of back disorders, and high-per-formance training of the back.

Much of his work is summarized in tworecent books: Low Back Disorders:Evidence Based Prevention andRehabilitation, and Ultimate BackFitness and Performance. Dr. McGill willdeliver the keynote presentation onThursday, July 15, talking about hisresearch and the relevance it has in thestrength and conditioning industry.

Through a faculty of over 50 and morethan 30 general sessions, the confer-ence’s content-driven forum will pro-vide strength and conditioning special-ists with in-depth instruction from aninternational group of academic andindustry experts. There are five concen-trated symposia sessions to choosefrom on Wednesday, July 14. These in-depth 4- or 6-hour symposia will exam-ine specific strength and conditioningtopics. Choose from Personal Trainingfor Seniors; Conditioning the CompleteSoccer Athlete; Beyond Ephedra: Safeand Effective Nutritional Supplements

for Health and Athletics (sponsored byGNC); Sport Performance Workshop(sponsored by Power Systems); andBasic Theory and Practice of Strength,Power, Plyometrics, Speed, and Agilityfor the High School Strength Coach(sponsored by M-F Athletic, PerformBetter).

Conference delegates will have theopportunity to interact with equip-ment providers to preview new andinnovative products in an exhibit set-ting. They will also be able to attendover 100 original research presenta-tions and practical, hands-on From theField presentations each day in theexhibit hall during lunch. In addition,job-seeking delegates will have theopportunity to network with others inthe field. The NSCA Career ServicesCenter will be available throughoutthe conference.

For more information on the NSCAAnnual National Conference, call (800)815-6826 and ask for the ConferenceDepartment, or visit the NSCA websiteat www.nsca-lift.org.

27th Annual National ConferenceNSCA

86 ◆ T&C M A Y / J U N E 2 0 0 4 ◆ A T H L E T I C B I D . C O MRequest No. 58 Request No. 59

Page 89: Training & Conditioning 14.4

List of Exhibitors

Accelerade/PacificHealth Labs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .615-617Advo Care . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .513BiPro . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .414Black Iron Strength . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .417-516Champion Nutrition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .401Compex Technologies, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .211-213

See ad on page 90Country Power Inc (Power Hooks ®) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .313Dartfish USA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .500Dragon Door Publications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .605-704DS-2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .202Dynamic Fitness Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .403-405Edu Technology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .TBDFrappier Acceleration Sports Training (FAST) . . . . . .611-613General Nutrition Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .TBDGill Athletics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .311Hampton Fitness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .309Human Kinetics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .106 & 108

See ads on pages 28 & 88 Impulse Training Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .204Jump Rope Technology, Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .609-708Life Fitness/Hammer Strength . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .201-302

See ad on page 35 M-F Athletic Co. / Perform Better . . . . . . . . . . . . . .408-412

See ads on pages 15 & 115

Natural Ovens Bakery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .214Nickols Brokerage Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .TBDNSCA Certification Commission . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .118

See ad on page 95O.P.T.P. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .310

See ad on page 87Power Lift . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .301-404Power Systems, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .505-604RXSD / MET-Rx . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .509Sorinex Exercise Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .502-504Sports Performance System . . .409,411,413,508,510,512,514SWIS/StrengthPro . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .110The Stick / RPI of Atlanta . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .98Trainer's Edge Pro . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .214Training and Conditioning Magazine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .501UESAKA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .205-304Velocity Sports Performance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .200VersaClimber/ VersaPulley . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .511VERTIMAX by Genetic Potential . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .209, 308

See ad on page 93Woodway USA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .208-212

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A T H L E T I C B I D . C O M ◆ T&C M A Y / J U N E 2 0 0 4 ◆ 87

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Top row L to R: Wooden Uniplane Rocker, ROCK™ Ankle Exercise Board, Fitball® Exercise Balls;Middle row: OPTP Foam Rollers, Janda Exercise Sandals, Airex Balance Pad; Bottom row: 2-Trac™,Wooden Wobble, Disc-O-Sit. Not shown: Many other balance and core stabilization products. Call for your free catalog!

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NATA Booth No. 825 Request No. 60 NSCA Booth No. 310

Page 90: Training & Conditioning 14.4

27th Annual National ConferenceNSCAWednesday, July 14, 2004

8:00 a.m. - 11:50 a.m.Personal Training for Seniors,Michelle Streif, MS, NSCA-CPT

10:00 am - 5:00 pmBeyond Ephedra: Safe and EffectiveNutritional Supplements for Healthand Athletics, Andrew Fry, PhD,CSCS; William Kraemer, PhD; MikeStone, PhD; Joseph Weir, PhDSPONSORED BY GNC LiveWell

10:00 am - 5:00 pmBasic Theory & Practice of Strength,Power, Plyometrics, Speed & Agilityfor the High School Strength Coach,Bud Bjornaraa, CSCS*D, NSCA-CPT*D;Mike Nitka, MS, CSCS; Larry Meadors,PhD, CSCS*D, NSCA-CPT*DSPONSORED BY MF ATHLETIC, PER-FORM BETTER

10:00 am - 5:00 pmSport Performance Workshop, DavidSandler, MS, CSCS*DSPONSORED BY POWER SYSTEMS

1:00 pm - 5:00 pmConditioning the Complete Soccer

Athlete, Vern GambettaSPONSORED BY GAMBETTA SPORTSTRAINING SYSTEMS

Thursday, July 15, 2004

9:00 a.m. - 10:20 a.m.Main Principles of Periodization,Vladimir Zatsiorsky, PhD

9:00 am - 10:20 amExercise Training After Total JointReplacement, Dan Wathen, MS,ATC/L, CSCS*D, NSCA-CPT*D; JeffFalkel, PhD, PT, CSCS*D

10:30 am - 11:20 amDo Extra Amino Acids and ProteinBuild Bigger Muscles? Martin Gibala,Ph.D.SPONSORED BY GATORADE SPORTSCIENCE INSTITUTE

10:30 am - 11:20 amKettle Bell Training, MichaelCastrogiovanni, CSCS

1:00 pm - 1:50 pmUse of Muscle Oxygen Saturation inExercise and Training, Ann Snyder,PhD, CSCS

1:00 pm - 1:50 pmACL Post-Rehabilitation TrainingTransitioning from Surgery Back tothe Field, Chris Gellert, MPT, CSCS

2:00 pm - 2:50 pmThe Dose-Response for StrengthDevelopment: Scientific Evidence,Matthew Rhea, MS

2:00 pm - 2:50 pmEating Disorders, Michelle Tarrant,PhD, ATC, LAT

3:00 pm - 4:50 pmFrom Start to Finish: A PerformanceTraining Model for a BasketballAthlete Program, John Taylor, MS,CSCS*D

3:00 pm - 4:50 pmTraining Movements Not Muscles PartI & II, Chuck Wolf, MS

Friday, July 16, 2004

9:00 a.m. - 10:20 a.m.Functional Training - Its History andLegacy, Ed Thomas, EdD; Juan CarlosSantana, MEd, CSCS*D

88 ◆ T&C M A Y / J U N E 2 0 0 4 ◆ A T H L E T I C B I D . C O M

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Page 91: Training & Conditioning 14.4

Workshop Schedule9:00 a.m. - 10:20 a.m.

10:30 am - 11:20 amFit for Sports, Diane Vives, CSCS*D

10:30 am - 11:20 amPractical Testing Techniques forAssessing Baseball Players, FrankSpaniol, EdD, CSCS

1:00 pm - 1:50 pmAnatomical and PhysiologicalConsiderations for Training theFemale Athlete, Jaynie Bjornaraa(Schram), MPH, MS, PT, SCS, ATC,CSCS*D

1:00 pm - 1:50 pmStrength Coaches’ Guide to Muscle-Building Supplements, Rob Skinner,MS, RD/LD, CSCS

2:00 pm - 4:50 pmNeuromuscular Adaptations to HighVelocity Exercise, Lee Brown, EdD,CSCS*D; Andrew Fry, PhD, CSCS;William Kraemer, PhD; Jeff McBride,Ph.D., CSCS; Robert Newton, CSCS

2:00 pm - 2:50 pmWhat it Takes to Train Athletes theRight Way, Bob Damashek, MA, CSCS

3:00 pm - 4:50 pmTraining the Secondary FitnessCharacteristics, Pete Twist

Saturday, July 17, 2004

9:00 am - 10:20 am3-D to the Core, Michael Griffith,CSCS, PT

9:00 am - 10:20 amTeaching in the Trenches, StevenPlisk, MS, CSCS*DSPONSORED BY MF ATHLETIC, PER-FORM BETTER

10:30 am - 11:20 amPreseason Conditioning for AspiringYoung Athletes, Avery Faigenbaum,EdD, CSCS*D

10:30 am - 11:20 amDoes Stretching Decrease MuscleForce Output and Decrease Risk ofInjury? Jeff McBride, PhD, CSCS

1:00 pm - 1:50 pmPost-Activation Potentiation:Implications for Training andCompetition, Loren Chiu, MS, CSCS

1:00 pm - 2:50 pmRunning Mechanics and Foot Speed,Al Biancani, EdD, CSCS*D

2:00 pm - 2:50 pmPromoting Athletic DevelopmentThrough National Benchmarks, JamesMcFarland, Jr, CSCS

3:00 pm - 3:50 pmPossible Innovations in Resistance-Exercise Training Programs Based onthe Mechanism of MuscleHypertrophy, Naokata Ishii, PhD

3:00 pm - 3:50 pmThe Elimination of the Press and theRejuvenation of Weightlifting, BudCharniga

4:00 pm - 4:50 pmTeaching Strength and ConditioningPrinciples Through a FitnessCurriculum, Daniel Morrissey, ATC, CSCS

4:00 pm - 4:50 pmThe 10 Things Every Athlete Needs toKnow about Nutrition and How toGet Them to Build it into Their Lives,Dawn Weatherwax, RD/LD, ATC/L,CSCS

A T H L E T I C B I D . C O M ◆ T&C M A Y / J U N E 2 0 0 4 ◆ 89

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A T H L E T I C B I D . C O M ◆ T&C M A Y / J U N E 2 0 0 4 ◆ 91

C O M P E T I T I V E E D G E

n the basketball court,post players are oftenthe center of attention.Coaches will developtheir offensive gameplans around good cen-

ters, and may even change their offense

completely if they do not have a domi-nant one. On defense, a powerful cen-ter can influence her opponent onalmost every trip down the court.

These players deserve the sameamount of attention in the weightroomthat they receive on the court. Many

centers have relied on the advantagesof their height at lower levels of playonly to find that advantage negated athigher levels. Top college teams typi-cally have someone 6-foot-4 to 6-foot-6 at center and a couple of 6-foot-plusplayers at forward. So now these cen-ters have to use their strength and agili-ty to compete, not just their height.

I have had the opportunity to workwith some great post players, such asLisa Leslie, Tina Thompson, MichelleSnow, Kara Wolters, DeLisha Milton,Ashley Robinson, Lindsay Taylor, andmany more. My work with each beganthe same way, by studying them com-

Jackie Ansley is the Founder of PerformanceTraining Inc., located in Knoxville, Chicago,Cleveland, and Orlando. A former NCAADivision I player and high school coach,she has trained more than 120 professionalwomen’s basketball players as well as topcollegiate teams, including Tennessee, Duke,and Penn State.

Size is only part of the

mixture that makes a

great post player.

Strength, agility, and

footwork are what keep

centers on the ball.

BY JACKIE ANSLEY

STRENGHOFCENTER

Tennessee senior center Ashley Robinson makes a move around LSU's Treynell Clavelle.

O

Page 94: Training & Conditioning 14.4

pletely. My evaluation methods varybased on the circumstances, but I useas many sources as possible, fromgame tapes to the way the players per-form in various tests, such as two-footvertical jumps, shuffle drills, and linearsprints. I also ask the players and theircoaches what they want to get out ofthe training sessions.

The underlying questions I need toanswer before designing a programare: What does this player need to be abetter center? What can I do to helpcreate a strong, dominant center whowill play effectively on both ends ofthe floor?

Although each player has differentattributes and needs, there are somecommon problem areas in many of thetall centers I see: hip strength, corestrength, balance, and body position-

ing. The last two problems result from,yet also exacerbate, the first two.Insufficient hip and core strengthinhibits a center’s ability to achievegood body balance and positioning onthe court. Bad habits created by a lackof balance and proper positioning, inturn, lead to further weakening of thecore and hips.

These four classic problems alsocombine to create another deficiency:lack of explosive power. Without goodcore strength, balance, and body posi-tioning, centers can be easily pushedaround and bodied out under the basket.

To absorb the constant physicalpounding that centers face game aftergame, they must develop a solid core.Even centers with enough playingskills to succeed despite a lack of corestrength may see that weakness mani-

fested in lower back pain. Once a cen-ter has developed sufficient corestrength she can begin to work onagility and quickness.

A comprehensive preseason con-ditioning program for basketball cen-ters should address all of these needssystematically. This is achieved byintegrating stretching, strength train-ing, core work, and speed, agility, andquickness (SAQ) training into one pro-gram, such as the one presented inTable One (above left). Of course, theprogram should be modified whenworking with younger players, playerswith less training time available, orplayers with a lower overall level ofconditioning.

DYNAMIC WARMUP

In the desire to make your centers big-ger, faster, and stronger, it’s easy tooverlook the importance of stretching.Many of the players I see are verytight, yet do not take the time tostretch. This will often show up in aplayer’s inability to properly performcertain drills (such as dropping theknee when they stride out during linear

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▼Table One: Preseason Schedule

Mon./Fri. Tues./Thur. Wed.SAQ/explosion Shooting Skill drillsCourt sprints Court workout Manual cardioUpper-body weights Lower-body weights Pool workout

Vertical explosion

UPPER BODYLat pulls in front 3x8Cable low rows 3x8Pec deck 3x8Push-ups 3x10-15Shoulder press 3x8DB shoulder raises 2x10 each

(lateral, front, reverse)Triceps overhead cable ext. 3x8DB curls 3x8Pull-ups/dips 2x10 each

(weight loaded if needed)

LOWER BODYHip abduction 3x15Hip adduction 3x15Leg press (single leg) 3x10 eachLeg curls (single leg) 3x10 eachShort arcs (single leg) 3x10 eachCalf raises (standing or seated) 3x10DB step-ups 3x10 each

Tuck jumps 3x10Box jumps routine:

Single box up (2 feet) 1x10Single box drop off and up 1x10Single box over 1x102 boxes drop off and up 1x10 each

(small to big, big to small)

CORE STRENGTHBridges on floor 3x30-60sec. each

(front, back, left, right) (add 5 leg lifts at end to challenge)

Push-ups on physio ball 2x10Physio ball pass over and back 1x10Medicine ball routine:

Overhead pass 2x10Chest pass 2x10Trunk twists 2x10Crunch to push pass 2x10

Table Two: Strength Workouts

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strides) or repeated injuries.Before beginning our workouts, I

have players warm and lubricate theirmuscles with some jogging, followed bystatic and dynamic stretching. Once thewarmup and stretching are complete,the players’ muscles will be more elas-tic, and blood flow and muscle metabo-lism will be elevated, thus increasing theeffectiveness of their workouts.

To drive home the importance ofstretching before any workouts, prac-tices, or games, I frequently ask play-ers how many times they have said, “Ittook me three trips down the court tofinally get my legs.” Once they havelearned to start every session withstretching, they always want to contin-ue because they feel ready for whatev-er comes next.

Don’t forget about post-workoutstretching. Finishing each session withstretching allows athletes to relax themuscles and gently return the body toits resting state. It also keeps circula-tion elevated and, when combined witha sports drink containing protein, letsthe muscle cells deliver nutrients toand clear metabolic wastes away fromthe muscles. Thus, muscles recoverfaster, are less sore, and are better ableto stave off cramps and injuries.

STRENGTH TRAINING

The bedrock of my preseason programfor centers is strength training. I con-stantly preach to the athletes that suc-

cess on the court begins in the weight-room. Power, speed, and agility all relyon strength, so it’s important to build aproper strength base before trainingthese other areas. Without the properstrength, athletes can’t do the rest ofthe workouts needed to improve, andthe risk of injury is greater.

The program design is based onthe age of the athlete and her baselinestrength when she reports for presea-son conditioning, which should beginabout six to eight weeks prior to thefirst practice. Ideally, the athlete hasincreased her overall strength in theoff-season so we can focus on powerand explosion as they directly pertainto basketball. If not, this base strengthmust be developed first before specificpower and explosive training canbegin. This is especially true for cen-ters since long-limbed and thinnerplayers will often be lacking in upper-body strength.

In Table Two (on page 92), I haveshown typical upper- and lower-bodyroutines and core training for the firstweek of lifting, which I will vary witheach post player depending on hermuscular endurance and strength. Ichoose exercises that relate directly towhat the players need to do on thecourt, and I also adjust the mix toaddress specific weaknesses that I have seen.

During the first four weeks of thepreseason, I focus on overloading and

increasing loads as much as possible.But even in this stage of strength train-ing, I encourage the athlete to thinkabout being explosive and performingthe concentric phase of each lift withspeed. They must then be able to con-trol the weights on the negative.

After four or five weeks, I evalu-ate each player’s progress and start tochange their sets and reps to get themready for the first day of practice.When it comes to the numbers of setsand reps or the amount of weight, I ammore concerned with increasing thework load each week than reachingany preset maximums.

Along with our structured coretraining, I challenge players to focuson core activation and proper posturethroughout the entire workout. Ineverything we do—warm up, weights,speed-agility-quickness exercises, andcourt workouts—I hammer home theimportance of the core and balance.

AGILITY ADJUSTMENT

By working intensively on agility(change of direction/change of speed)and explosive power (first step alongwith vertical leaping), you can create amore explosive, more active, andquicker center who is able to competeat a higher level. This process beginswith training footwork and teachingathletes how to load their hips and gainmore explosion and balance.

To develop foot speed, I focus on

Focus is on lateral explosion/lateral movementMini hurdles (6-8 hurdles):

Side runs x2-3Side runs back and forth x2-3Side runs and back x2-3Side hops x2-3Side hops back and forth x2 each

Balance and stabilization:Defensive stance with movement x3-5

(hold 10 sec.)Single-leg stabilization (hold 5 sec.) x3-5 each legSingle-leg hops (5 sec.) x3-5

Plyometrics:Skate jumps with sidewinders x3Skate jumps without sidewinders x1-2Zigzag shuffles with sidewinders x3Zigzag shuffles without sidewinders x1-2Zigzag shuffles on visual command, x4

sprint back

Court sprints (build to 1:1 rest-to-work ratio)Big threes x4Figure eights x2 clockwise/counter clockwiseShuttle sprints x2 start left/start right

Table Three: SAQ Workout

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▼performing the positive phase of liftsquickly. Whether they’re doing legpresses, leg curls, or other exercises, Iconstantly stress the importance ofexploding quickly to start, then paus-ing briefly before controlling theweight on the way down. I also tie theirankles together with bungee cords andput them through shuffle drills, or evenrun them through one-on-one drillswith a ball.

Loading the hips is very importantto developing the explosive powerneeded to become a better rebounder,post up strongly, hold space, and beready to shoot once the ball is received.It also puts a center in a better positionto move her feet when the player she isdefending receives the ball. Many postplayers are not able to execute multiplejumps without losing elevation eachtime. By improving hip strength andlearning how to get in proper positionwith their hips down in a quarter-squattype of stance, posts can load their hips

and elevate better in multiple jumps.After footwork and hip loading

comes specific agility work. Manyposts can only play well if they stay inone spot. Once they are asked to makecuts they lose all balance and strength.

I continually challenge the athletein each SAQ workout and try to con-vey to her how this skill comes into hergame. I’ll constantly ask, “What arewe working on? Why are we doingthese drills?” If a player understandshow a drill can help her down the road,then she will usually work extremelyhard.

In Table Three (on page 94), Ihave included a sample SAQ workoutthat addresses lateral movement andlinear explosion. As we progressthrough the preseason, I will changethe work level and number of reps tokeep the workout challenging.

I also adjust the workouts to meeteach player’s specific needs. Forexample, one player may be great

Table four:Sample Cardio

Workout

This workout is for the ellipticaltrainer. Start with a 15-minutewarmup at level 6-8, 150 stridesper minute (spm). Workout thenconsists of sustained high-intensityintervals at level 10 that rangefrom 170 to 200 spm with activerest consistent at 120 or 130 spm.Finish with cooldown.

High Intensity Active Rest2.0 min. at 170 spm 1.0 min.1.5.min. at 180 spm 0.5 min.1.0 min. at 190 spm 2.0 min.0.5 min. at 200 spm 2.5 min.1.0 min. at 190 spm 2.0 min.1.5 min. at 180 spm 1.5 min.2.0 min. at 170 spm 1.0 min.

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Page 99: Training & Conditioning 14.4

straight ahead and weak laterally, so Iwould increase the number of side runsor zigzag shuffles. Another player mayhave the opposite characteristics so Iwould use more high-knee skips orrun-throughs.

The drills prescribed to each play-er should represent what she actuallyneeds rather than a one-size-fits-allagenda. I know some strength coacheshave some favorite drills they like touse, but you must ask yourself, “Is thisplayer ready to do this particular drill?Will it make her a better center?”

CARDIO TRAINING

My emphasis when developing the car-diovascular fitness of any player isavoiding excessive impact. This is evenmore important with centers, many ofwhom are more inclined to foot andankle problems because of their size.

I do not recommend having play-ers jog long distances. We have alldone long-distance running as athletesor prescribed it to our athletes. Butplayers need to prepare for the specificdemands of their position. Post playersneed to develop endurance that allowsthem to recover very quickly betweenrepeated high-intensity efforts thatengage a lot of fast-twitch musclefibers. They do not need endurancethat allows them to sustain a steady,moderate intensity involving mostlyslow-twitch fibers. Long-distance run-ning is therefore counterproductive.

I do not have players run on thetrack in the preseason. I can get the jobdone while limiting the pounding theyreceive by using cardio equipmentsuch as a stationary bike, ellipticaltrainer, or cross trainer, as well assprint drills on the court. I avoid tread-mills because of the constant poundingon the legs and feet.

I use workouts featuring sustained,high-intensity intervals. These can go aslong as two minutes at high strides perminute (spm) or revolutions per minute(rpm) with an active rest of one to twominutes at a lower spm or rpm. As thefirst practice approaches, we move toshort sprint intervals (15 to 45 seconds

at a higher spm or rpm with 15- to 45-second active rest at a moderate spm orrpm). Table Four (on page 96) details asample cardio program.

If your facilities permit pool work-outs, they are another excellent way toperform conditioning work with mini-mal impact. These workouts can incor-porate not only cardio training but alsostrength and power training while pro-ducing a fraction of the impact forces

that are absorbed on the court.Regardless of the resources at your

disposal, you will be able to help yourcenters become more effective on thecourt if you are able to build their corestrength and improve their agility. Thespecific exercises and drills are onlytools and are of little use if not used cor-rectly. So, make sure athletes are readyfor the drills you assign and that theywill be of benefit on the court. ◆

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PRODUCT D IRECTORY

199. . . . . 3-Point Products. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71151. . . . . Accelerated Care Plus . . . . . . . . . . . 64136. . . . . Aircast (AirHeel) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62167. . . . . Aircast (Cryo/Cuff). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66176. . . . . Ball Dynamics International . . . . . . . 67168. . . . . Biofreeze (pain management) . . . . . . . . . . 66113. . . . . Biofreeze (Single Use Dispenser) . . . . . . . . 60152. . . . . BioMedical Life (BioStim NMS +) . . . . . . . 64153. . . . . BioMedical Life (QuadStar) . . . . . . . . . . 64138. . . . . BioSkin (Q Lok APT) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62137. . . . . Bio Skin (TriLok) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62114. . . . . BNA Modular Concepts (MedBed) . . . . 60115. . . . . BNA Modular Concepts (Slant Board) . . 60139. . . . . Brace International . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62117. . . . . BSN-Jobst (Jobst for Men) . . . . . . . . . . . 60116. . . . . BSN-Jobst (Strappal) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60154. . . . . Chattanooga Group (PresSsion). . . . . . . 64200. . . . . Chattanooga (Vectra Genisys) . . . . . . . . . 71201. . . . . Compex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71177. . . . . Contemporary Design (Shuttle Balance). . 67178. . . . . Contemporary Design (Shuttle MVP Elite) 67197. . . . . Cool Draft Scientific . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70202. . . . . Cramer (AS1 Ankle Brace) . . . . . . . . . . . . 71198. . . . . Cramer (Coil Cool) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71119. . . . . DM Systems (Ankle Tough) . . . . . . . . . . . 60118. . . . . DM Systems (Cadlow Shoulder Stabilizer) . . . 60179. . . . . Donovan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67158. . . . . Dynatronics (Solaris). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65120. . . . . Dynatronics (taping tables) . . . . . . . . . . . 60180. . . . . efi Sports Medicine . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68181. . . . . Exertools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68

161. . . . . Ferno (AquaGaiter) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65162. . . . . Ferno (custom pools) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65121. . . . . Foot Management (One-Stop EVA) . . . . . 61122. . . . . Foot Management (Static Calf Stretcher) . . 61169. . . . . Game Ready . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66166. . . . . Gatorade (Gatorade Ice) . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66165. . . . . Gatorade (Performance Series) . . . . . . . . . 66170. . . . . Gebauer (Instant Ice) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66171. . . . . Gebauer (Spray and Stretch) . . . . . . . . . . . 66123. . . . . General Physiotherapy . . . . . . . . . . . 61124. . . . . Graston Technique . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61182. . . . . Hammer Strength. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68189. . . . . Human Kinetics (Asthma) . . . . . . . . . . . 69188. . . . . Human Kinetics (Hand/Wrist) . . . . . . . . . 69156. . . . . IOMED (Companion 80) . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64155. . . . . IOMED (TransQ Flex) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64126. . . . . Kelly Kinetics (CryoThermal Massage Tool) . . 61125. . . . . Kelly Kinetics (Pivot Plate) . . . . . . . . . . . 61190. . . . . LW&W (ACSM Manual) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69191. . . . . LW&W (company overview). . . . . . . . . . . . 69140. . . . . McDavid (Ultra Ankle) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63141. . . . . McDavid (Ultralight Ankle Brace) . . . . . . . . 63143. . . . . Medical Specialties (Dynatrack) . . . . . . . 63142. . . . . Medical Specialties (Gripper) . . . . . . . . 63159. . . . . MedX . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65127. . . . . MedZone Corp. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61203. . . . . Mueller Sports Medicine(ATF Ankle Brace)71172. . . . . Mueller Sports Medicine (Cold/Hot Wrap) 67204. . . . . NASM (Body Map) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71192. . . . . NASM (Optimum Performance Training) . . . . . 69193. . . . . NSCA Certification (Personal Training) . . . 69

194. . . . . NSCA Certification (Strength Training) . . . 69196. . . . . NSCA (membership). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70195. . . . . NSCA (National Conference) . . . . . . . . . . . 70129. . . . . Oakworks (Portable Taping Table). . . . . . . . 61128. . . . . Oakworks (The Boss). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61184. . . . . OPTP (FitBALL Roller) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68183. . . . . OPTP (Stretch Out Strap) . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68185. . . . . Perform Better . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68186. . . . . Power Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68130. . . . . Premier Software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61187. . . . . PrePak Products (Power Trainer Pro) . . . . . 68131. . . . . PrePak Products (Web-Slide) . . . . . . . . . 62144. . . . . Pro-Tec Athletics (Iliotibial Band Wrap) . . . 63145. . . . . Pro-Tec Athletics (Shin Splints Wrap). . . . . 63133. . . . . PROTEAM by Hausmann (model A9068) 62132. . . . . PROTEAM by Hausmann (taping stations) 62134. . . . . Quest Technologies . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62160. . . . . Rich-Mar (AutoPrism). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65157. . . . . Rich-Mar (AutoSound Combo). . . . . . . . . . 65135. . . . . Sports Health . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62147. . . . . Stromgren Supports (SuperWrap) . . . . . 63146. . . . . Stromgren (Z175 Ankle System) . . . . . . . . 63149. . . . . Swede-O (Tarsal Lok). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63148. . . . . Swede-O (Thermoskin Supports) . . . . . . . . 63164. . . . . SwimEx (SPT Aquatic Treadmill) . . . . . . . . . 65163. . . . . SwimEx Systems (conditioning pools) . . . . 65173. . . . . ThermoTek . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67205. . . . . Townsend Design (functional knee braces) . 71150. . . . . Townsend Design (TM5 Hinges) . . . . . . . 64174. . . . . Whitehall Manufacturing (moist heat) . . 67175. . . . . Whitehall Manufacturing (ThermaSplint) . 67

104 . . . . Aqualift/Sports Innovations . . . . . . . 104105 . . . . Atlas Sport Medical . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104106 . . . . Barry University . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106101 . . . . Cool Draft Scientific . . . . . . . . . . . . 103102 . . . . Cramer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103

85 . . . . Donovan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9986 . . . . efi Sports Medicine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99

107 . . . . Esporta Wash Systems. . . . . . . . . . . 10687 . . . . Fitness First . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99

103 . . . . Go Flow, Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10388 . . . . Hammer Strength . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9989 . . . . Jump Stretch. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9990 . . . . Keiser (350 Biaxial Upper Back) . . . . . . . . . . 9991 . . . . Keiser (350 Seated Butterfly) . . . . . . . . . . . . 99

108 . . . . Mpulse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10692 . . . . NZ Manufacturing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9993 . . . . Perform Better . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10094 . . . . Power Systems (Bench Press) . . . . . . . . . 100

100 . . . . Power Systems (catalog) . . . . . . . . . . . 10195 . . . . Samson (Power Thrust) . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10096 . . . . Samson (Squat and Leap) . . . . . . . . . . . . 10097 . . . . Springco Athletics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100

109 . . . . THOR Laser . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10698 . . . . Xvest (Don Chu) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10199 . . . . Xvest (Fire Fighter model) . . . . . . . . . . . . 101

PRODUCTS D IRECTORYCIRCLE COMPANY PAGE NO. NO.

PRODUCTS D IRECTORYCIRCLE COMPANY PAGE NO. NO.

PRODUCTS D IRECTORYCIRCLE COMPANY PAGE NO. NO.

NATA SHOW PLANNER D IRECTORY

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Chest & Back

DONOVAN INDUSTRIES, INC.800-345-3456WWW.DONOVANINDUSTRIES.COM

Donovan™ Fitness Balls help athletesdevelop core strength in their abdominaland back regions, which improves physical

performance.Donovan™ProfessionalBurst-Resistantballs will notrapidly deflatelike the

cheaper balls and all Donovan™ Ballscome with a pump and measuring deviceto assure proper inflation. Experts stronglyrecommend using the correct size, there-fore Donovan offers eight sizes to coverall athletic needs.

Circle No. 85

EFI SPORTS MEDICINE800-525-6901WWW.EFISPORTSMEDICINE.COM

The new Total Gym 26000 comes with abuilt-in folding wide base squat stand thatadjusts to three heights and a highly

adaptablefolding footholder thatcan be raisedor lowered asrequired fortheperformance

of various lower body and trunk exercises.It also features the new Adjustable PulleyBar accessory that allows clinicians toadjust the height and width of the cablepulley angle for each individual’s size andspecific needs for each exercise.

Circle No. 86

FITNESS FIRST PRODUCTS800-421-1791WWW.FITNESS1ST.COM

NEW! Compact Aerobic Step-Space Saver,made by the original step company, pre-

mieres inFitnessFirstProducts'2004equipmentcatalog.The newpopular

version, 4” to 12.5” height adjustments,maximizes all types of lower body condi-tioning & enhances cardiovascular &

sports performance training. The completeHIGH STEP is 16" square; the platform is4" tall, with each riser elevating the plat-form by 2". The package includes oneblue platform and four black non-slip rub-ber tread risers and a Cathe FriedrichHIGH STEP video for $55.00 each. CallFitness First Products or shop online for agreat athletic training tool and a wide vari-ety of institutional fitness equipment.

Circle No. 87

HAMMER STRENGTH800-634-8637WWW.HAMMERSTRENGTH.COM

One of Hammer Strength’s most popularpieces of equipment, the Jammer, is partof the innovative Ground Base line. Thehighly versatile machine is ideal forathletes to train explosive movements. To

maximize athletic per-formance, users trainwith their feet on theground, promotingtotal-body stabilizationand better balancethat will transfer tomovements on theplaying field. In the

standing position, the athlete’s body isable to respond naturally to the exerciseexertion and gravity, spurring strengthen-ing of corresponding muscle groups andenhancing coordination.

Circle No. 88

JUMP STRETCH, INC.800-344-3539WWW.JUMPSTRETCH.COM

Jump Stretch, Inc., offers six sizes of heavy-duty continuous-loop rubberbands (FlexBands®) for strength training, flexibility

work, rehab,and even pow-erlifting. Bycombining thebands with thecompany'scustomized

pipe arrangements (for resistedwalking/running and weighted abdominalexercises) and patented tubular steelbases (for squats and squat thrusts), JumpStretch can help you make the most of anyavailable space in your workout area.

Circle No. 89

KEISER CORPORATION800-888-7009WWW.KEISER.COM

The 350 Biaxial Upper Back incorporates

a unique designwithunilateral/bilateralmovement.Designed forsuperior isolationof the upper back,this machine fea-tures anadjustable chest

cushion, which helps stabilize the exerciseposture while concentrating on the "elbowout" position, to ensure high upper backengagement through the full range ofmotion. The unique unilateral option pro-motes symmetry by assuring that thestronger side does not compensate forthe weaker side.

Circle No. 90

The 350 Seated Butterfly, by Keiser Corp.,is designed to minimize over-stretching thatmight occur with other "pec decks" by pro-

viding a wide vari-ety of adjustablestarting arm padpositions.Designed withcomfort in mind,the handgrip andforearm cushion-ing make correctbody alignment

simple. A fully adjustable seat allows usersup to five different ranges of motion to workboth the upper and lower pectoral musclesfor full chest development.

Circle No. 91

NZ MFG., LLC800-886-6621WWW.NZMFG.COM

TurfCordz Cuff Tuff (S117), from NZ Mfg.,LLC, is a portable tool used for shoulderstrengthening. It performs internal and

external rotation exercis-es to rehabilitate aninjury or strengthen tohelp prevent one. Madewith the highest qualitymaterials, they are avail-able in five resistancelevels. TurfCordz areused by leading profes-sionals for high level ath-letic training. Call the

company to learn more about all of itsinnovative products or visit its Web site toview the entire catalog.

Circle No. 92

A T H L E T I C B I D . C O M ◆ T&C M A Y / J U N E 2 0 0 4 ◆ 99

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Chest & Back

100 ◆ T&C M A Y / J U N E 2 0 0 4 ◆ A T H L E T I C B I D . C O M

PERFORM BETTER800-556-7464WWW.PERFORMBETTER.COM

In its 2004 catalog, Perform Better hasintroduced the JCPredator. Use one,two, or three bandsat a time in eachhandle. You canselect a tensionappropriate for theuser, and thehandles are extralarge allowing for an

easy, comfortable grip during movementpatterns. An exercise sheet is included.

Circle No. 93

POWER SYSTEMS, INC.800-321-6975WWW.POWER-SYSTEMS.COM

Power Systems’ Pro Olympic Bench Pressby Muscle Maxx has a fully welded framemade of strong 11 gauge 2-1/2” x 2-1/2”steel. It features fully adjustable uprights,and the bumpers at the base of theuprights protect the bench from scrapes.

The pads are 3/4”plywood coveredwith ensolitepadding and gen-uine 32 oz.naugahydestitched

upholstery. The frame and padding come ina wide variety of color options at no extracost. For more information on this and all ofPower Systems' products and programs,call the company or visit its Web site.

Circle No. 94

SAMSON WEIGHT TRAINING EQUIPMENT800-472-6766WWW.SAMSONEQUIPMENT.COM

The Samson Power Thrust is a dynamicpiece of equipment thatallows athletes to devel-op hip explosion, upperarm, and shoulderstrength. Each handleoperates independentlyon lineal ball bearings toallow for an amazingly

smooth movement. A variety of exercisesincluding extensions and rotations can easi-

ly be performed using this unique piece ofequipment. Check out the company's Website for more information.

Circle No. 95

The Samson Squat and Leap has a uniquedesign that enables athletes to develop ver-tical leaps, squats, and explosive jumps, as

well as shoulderstrength. As anadded bonus thispiece features anadjustable/remov-able calf plate forcalf raises, and aseat for shoulder

presses. The Samson Squat and Leap alsofeatures range limiters and weight horns foreasy loading and unloading of Olympicplates. Athletes from every sport can bene-fit from this dynamic piece of equipment.

Circle No. 96

SPRINGCO ATHLETICS800-333-7781WWW.SPRINGCOATHLETICS.COM

The JAMMER RACK made by Nebula fitnessand offered by Springco is the only triple

Request No. 70

Dry Skin/Psoriasis Massage Therapy

Minor Burns/Wounds Anti-Chafing Stick

All The Tools For Sprains, Strains, Wounds, and Pain

Care That You Need!

“I’ve had the opportunity to use most of the products in the MedZoneline. Specifically, the PainZone and MassageZone products are an integral part of my daily treatment repertoire. The players love the analgesic effects of PainZone, and I really appreciate the qualities ofMassageZone. There will always be a spot in mytraining room for MedZone products.”

-Kevin M. Kacer, ATC Chicago Wolves

Initial Wound Care

Sprains/Strains/Joint Pain

866 -MedZone (633 -9663)www.medzonecorp . com

Request No. 71NATA Booth No. 828

Page 103: Training & Conditioning 14.4

Chest & Back

articulated Jammer device available today.Made with 11 gauge steel tubing and high-

grade sealed bear-ings at all joints,the design ensuresdurability. Free formIso movement simu-lates a dumbbellexercise via free-floating actuator armsystems controlled

by heavy rubber bumper stops. There issimply no better device to train the explosiveaction required in today's sports- profession-al or collegiate.

Circle No. 97

X VEST800-697-5658WWW.THEXVEST.COM

“I have found the X Vest to be an excellenttool for providing overloads in both plyometricand strength training, conditioning and rehabili-tation programs. The fit and adaptability areexcellent. The X Vest allows for freedom ofmovement and doesn’t interfere with any ofthe agility, bounding or running programs that Iwrite for a wide variety of athletes, both colle-

giate and professional. The XVest has proven itself in myprograms! Thank you for allyour efforts and help inimproving my capability as astrength & conditioning spe-cialist.” — Donald A. ChuPh.D., PT, ATC, CSCS andauthor of Jumping intoPlyometrics. Circle No. 98

X Vest has a new weight configuration andit's heavy, 84 pounds of heavy. The new XVest known as the Fire Fighter model was

developed strictly for the FireFighter and their rigoroustraining. It has the basicdesign as the original XVest, but internally it has anew weight configurationallowing for 84 pounds.Because of its ability toadjust weight like the origi-

nal X Vest, numerous individuals from body-builders to the military are buying them. Formore information on all of the X Vest mod-els, call the company or visit its Web site.

Circle No. 99

Catalog Showcase

POWER SYSTEMS, INC.800-321-6975WWW.POWER-SYSTEMS.COM

Since 1986 Power Systems has been aleading supplier of sport training, healthand fitness products. Power Systems

prides itself inbeing the oneresource for all ofyour training needs.Its new 2004 cata-log has a new lookwith better graphicsand photos.Included areas arecore strength, med-icine balls, speed,

plyometrics, agility, strength equipment,strength accessories and flooring. You willfind the catalog full of hundreds of newproducts and dozens of products availableexclusively from Power Systems. The com-pany has also lowered some of its pricesto enable the customer to get premiumproducts at great prices. Go on-line or callPower Systems to request a free 2004 cat-alog today.

Circle No. 100

The Highest Quality Dry-Land Training Products Available! • StrechCordz with Handles (left) improves

stroke, endurance and strength • Exceptional dry-land training for curls, tricep

extensions, flies and lat pulls• Available in 5 resistance levels, it includes

2 dedicated tubes & handles, mounting loop

• Mini Modular Set (above) includes a pair ofinterchangeable handles, padded leg strapsand 3’ modular tubing with mounting straps

• Call us at 800-556-7464, or visit us online atwww.performbetter.com

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NATA Booth No. 436 Request No. 72 Request No. 73

A T H L E T I C B I D . C O M ◆ T&C M A Y / J U N E 2 0 0 4 ◆ 101

Page 104: Training & Conditioning 14.4

Web News

LEARN ABOUT INJURIES THROUGH WEB SITE’S “PATIENT CENTER.”Aircast®, Inc., the trusted leader of orthopedic devices, now makes itsimple to learn about injuries such as sprains, muscle strains,tendonitis, and turf toe (to name just a few) using the Patient Center onthe Aircast Web site. Accessible throughout the site, the Patient Centerallows the user to point-and-click to quick, interactive information abouttheir symptoms and conditions. For each condition, the Center also sug-gests clinically proven Aircast products to help treat ailments and relievesymptoms.www.aircast.com

NEW SECTIONS ADDED TO THE BIO SKIN WEB SITEThe Bio Skin® Web site has been updated with a new look and moreinformation. Some additions include company history, detailed productinformation, video, clinical studies, product application instructions, andan online shopping cart. After NATA 2004, a new product showcase willbe launched online featuring several products that will be released thisyear. Be sure to visit www.bioskin.com for more information on BioSkin’s new and existing products and discover why Bio Skin®represents the next generation of compressive bracing. www.bioskin.com

FERNO SITE FEATURES THREE NEW PRODUCT CATEGORIESThe Ferno Performance Pools’ Web site has a new, exciting look! Thenew site offers easier navigation through seven product sections, includ-ing three new categories: Therapy & Fitness Accessories, MedZone®and Liquid Ice™. The site has a new Contact page with sales reps’ com-plete information and an Educational Programs page for upcomingaquatic therapy sessions scheduled to be held across the U.S. In addi-tion to new products and customer testimonials, Ferno Whirlpool specifi-cation sheets and a pool buyer’s guide can be found on the FernoPerformance Pools’ Web site. www.fernoperformancepools.com

INSTRUCTIONAL VIDEOS AVAILABLE ON LIFE FITNESS/HAMMERSTRENGTH SITE

Life Fitness’ cutting-edge Web site features the Life Fitness andHammer Strength brands, providing in-depth information about the com-pany’s complete lines of cardiovascular and strength training products,as well as its partner companies. Streaming product videos show properuse of the equipment. The site also includes a unique color configurator,printable brochures, and allows users to sign-up for the company’smonthly e-newsletter.www.lifefitness.com/commercial/home.asp

NASM OFFERS TOOLS FOR EDUCATION AND DEVELOPMENTNASM is pleased to introduce its all-new Web site at www.nasm.org!Featuring enhanced navigation, expanded information and new memberbenefits, the site will quickly become an industry favorite for educationand development. From personalized Web sites to program design, ithas the tools and solutions to help professionals propel their career tothe next level. Log on now for a preview! While you’re there, be sure toregister for a complimentary membership, which includes bimonthlynewsletters, special discounts and so much more!www.nasm.org

OPTP’S “WHAT’S NEW” SECTION SHOWCASES SPECIAL PROMO-TIONS, NEW PRODUCTS

OPTP's updated Web site is easy, fast, and secure. The new HomePage has links to the following categories: Leaders in Physical Therapy& Rehabilitation; Treating Back Pain; Pilates; Importance of CoreStability; and Affordable Balance Boards. Customers quickly find whatthey are looking for by using the keyword search and product lists. OPTPoffers the latest products and resources in health and fitness and pro-vides convenient links to other informative sites for quick and easy refer-ence. Also, check out OPTP's "What's New" section for updated monthlyspecial features of promotions and take a sneak peak at OPTP's brandnew products. www.optp.com

Your First StringDefense Against

Dehydration

Your First StringDefense Against

Dehydration

The Generation II Aqualift*

the original Hydration System

from Sports Innovations

1-800-288-3954www.sportsinnovations.com

• 10 gallon insulated beverage container

• Multi-unit stacking feature

• All terrain maneuverability

• Dual power supply

• Easy filling & cleaning

• 500 lb capacity

• All aluminum frame

• 4 fully adjustable PVC labcock drinking valves

• Adjustable pressure cut off switch

*The Aqualift Portable DrinkingSystem is proprietary property ofSports Innovations, Ltd. and isprotected by U.S. and ForeignPatents issued and pending.

PROUDTO BEMADE INTHE USA

Accept NoSubstitutes.Accept No

Substitutes.

Request No. 74

Page 105: Training & Conditioning 14.4

Climate Control

COOL DRAFT SCIENTIFIC866-676-1636WWW.COOLDRAFT.COM

�Product Categories: Cooling Fans,Misting Fans�Product Advantages:

For 2004, Cool DraftScientific has launched thelong awaited Evolution line.You can now afford thesame high quality systemsused by NFL and collegeteams. Cool Draft Evolutionis a complete line of high-pressure misting fansdesigned for sidelines andpractices. The Evolution

was built to meet the needs and budgetsof high schools. The company has alsoupgraded its Cool Draft portable mistingfan making it the company’s most popularand effective to date. �Special Programs or Services: CoolDraft Scientific offers 18 shippinglocations throughout the United States;saving its customers time and money.

Circle No. 101

CRAMER PRODUCTS, INC.913-856-7511WWW.CRAMERSPORTSMED.COM

�Product Categories: Hydration Systems�Product Advantages:

The Coil Cool is aneconomical, efficientsource for dispensing colddrinking water. A coppercoil inside the cooler car-ries drinking water fromthe water portable hoseattachment to the drinkinghoses that hang on thesides of the cooler. Justadd ice to the cooler,

attach your water portable hose, and crispcool water is available through fouradjustable drinking nozzles.

Circle No. 102

GO FLOWWWW.GOFLOW.NET

�Product Categories: Cooling Fans,Misting Fans, Portable Drinking Systems,and Sideline Heating Systems�Product Advantages:

Hydration is serious business. Qualitymatched with affordability is the Patented

FLOW drink-ing device.FLOW issteadilybecoming

the top choice of sports teams and emer-gency industries nationwide. Coolingdevices are a nice addition in preventingheat problems, but can't cool the bodyinside. Delivering water quickly in a sani-tary way is paramount. Give your athleteswhat they need and deserve. Visit thecompany's Web site for more informationon the FLOW and other useful products. �Special Services: The company alsoprovides Frogg Toggs rain gear, X-Bands,elastic bands, Chilly Pads sport towel, YakTrax shoe traction device, SaniVexDisinfecting Chemistry, and misting andheating systems rentals and sales. GoFlow offers a full range of sideline coolingand hydration devices. It also offers greatfund-raising ideas to raise thousands ofdollars.

Circle No. 103

A T H L E T I C B I D . C O M ◆ T&C M A Y / J U N E 2 0 0 4 ◆ 103

What can you really DOwith giant rubber bands?!What can you really DO

with giant rubber bands?!Run Faster Jump Higher Play Lower

Reduce Injuries Add Resistance to Machine Lifts

Improve Endurance Increase Flexibility

The Best-Kept Secret in Pro SportsUsed by the Patriots, Cowboys, Yankees, Indians, Red Sox,

Mariners, Hornets, Heat and many more!

Flex Bands have been improving athletic performance since 1980.

Jump Stretch, Inc.1230 N. Meridian Rd. Youngstown, OH 44509www.jumpstretch.com 1-800-344-3539 Fax: 1-330-793-8719

Stay Ahead of Your Competitionwith Flex Bands!

Stay Ahead of Your Competitionwith Flex Bands!

The Best-Kept Secret in Pro Sports

Request No. 75

Page 106: Training & Conditioning 14.4

Climate Control More Products

SPORTS INNOVATIONS800-288-3954WWW.SPORTSLTD.COM

�Product Categories: Portable DrinkingSystems�Product Advantages: Every sports team needs WATER andAqualift Portable Drinking Systems DELIV-

ERS--from children on theplaying field to the profes-sionals of the NFL—every-one who needs waterneeds the Aqualift. Thefinest hydration system onthe market, made fromthe highest quality materi-als, Aqualift continues tobe the choice ofprofessional, college, and

high school athletic teams throughout theworld. 10 gallons, 4 drinking hoses, stack-ing, complete with battery and charger.�Special Services: Bid specifications areavailable at www.sportsltd.com or by call-ing 800-288-3954.

Circle No. 104

104 ◆ T&C M A Y / J U N E 2 0 0 4 ◆ A T H L E T I C B I D . C O M

Competing withoutworrying about anankle injuryWhy do Athletic Trainers Trust theTriLok™ Ankle Brace?

…Reduce Injury…Save Time…Save Money

“I am a certified athletic trainer andhave been involved in athletic trainingfor seven years. Over those years I

have comeacross and per-sonally woreseveral differenttypes of braces.When it comesto overallprotection, com-fort, and durabil-ity, the TriLok™ankle brace is

hands down the best brace on the mar-ket today. My athletes can obtain thegreatest level of ankle injury preventionif they are wearing the TriLok™. Lastschool year I had over 100 anklebraces that my athletes wore through-out the sports seasons, and only onegrade I sprain occurred. The TriLok™ankle brace allows my athletes to com-pete day in and day out at the highestlevel possible without having to worryabout injury. Having my athletes wearan outstanding brace for a great priceallows me to save money on tape eachyear.”

Eli Champagne, ATCOregon

Bioskin/Cropper Medical240 East Hersey St., Ste. 2, Ashland, OR [email protected]

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ATLAS SPORT [email protected]

Anodyne is an FDA-cleared, infrared photo-energy therapy that has been clinicallyproven to increase local microcirculation

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Circle No. 105

Continued on page 106

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Page 107: Training & Conditioning 14.4

INNOVATIONS IN BRACING WITHSEBASTIEN VILLON

Sebastien Villon is a GlobalProduct Manager for Aircast

Incorporatedwhere hedevelopsandcoordinatesMarketingstrategiesfocusing onthe AnkleBrace and

Walking Brace product lines."It is always exciting to seean Aircast product help anathlete get back in thegame".

Company Q& A

Q. READERS MAY NOT BE FAMIL-IAR WITH YOUR COMPANY, SOPLEASE TELL US ABOUT AIRCAST.

Aircast was founded in the early 1970s byGlenn Johnson after he fractured his tibiawhile skiing. After months in a plaster castGlenn wasn't healing properly and, with noprior Orthopedic training, he created thefirst off-the-shelf below-the-knee cast: the“Aircast”. Since then, Aircast has expandedand developed products for a wide range oforthopedic and sports-related conditions.

Q. WHAT SPORTS-RELATEDCONDITIONS CAN AIRCAST PROD-UCTS TREAT?

Achilles tendonitis, tennis elbow, patellatendonitis, and the most common sports-related injury both in the US and worldwide,ankle sprains. The Aircast Air-Stirrup® AnkleBrace, referred to many times simply as an“Aircast”, is the standard of care for anklesprains. We also have an ankle brace tohelp prevent injury, the AirSport® AnkleBrace. What makes our Ankle Braces differ-ent is the patented Duplex™ aircell systemthat has been clinically proven to reduceedema and accelerate rehab. You can actu-ally reduce swelling and pain while you walkwhen wearing one of our Ankle Braces.

Q. SINCE THE AIRCELL SYSTEMIS UNIQUE TO AIRCAST, WHATOTHER PRODUCTS DO YOU HAVETHAT UTILIZE THE CONCEPT?

Most Aircast products take advantage of air-cell technology. The AirHeel™, which treatsAchilles tendonitis among other foot-relatedailments, uses two interconnected aircellsto produce a soothing massage while youwalk. Other products, like the Armband fortennis elbow and Infrapatellar Band forpatella tendonitis, apply focused compres-sion with one aircell for symptom relief.Focused compression is found in ourCryo/Cuff® products as well, but they utilizecold water instead of air to apply compres-sion along with controlled cold.

Q. WHAT DO YOU MEAN BY "CON-TROLLED COLD"?

Controlled cold refers to the ability of theuser to adjust and maintain the degree ofcold that is applied to their injury; a key ele-ment in Aircast’s Cryo/Cuff cryo-compression therapy system. Let meexplain: with the Cryo/Cuff System, the userfills the cooler with cold water and ice,applies the cuff, and connects the two witha tube. Raising the cooler allows chilledwater to flow into the cuff. The amount ofwater you add to the cuff determines thedegree of cold and amount of compressionthat is applied to your injury. When thewater begins to warm, the cuff is easilydrained and refreshed with cold water sim-ply by lowering and raising the cooler, youdon’t need to remove the cuff and the entirearea remains dry — you can’t do that withice bags and tape. In addition, the cuffs areanatomically designed providing completecoverage to the injured knee, shoulder,ankle, etc.

Q. HOW CAN OUR READERSLEARN MORE ABOUT AIRCASTPRODUCTS AND SERVICES?

The easiest source of information is ourWeb site, www.aircast.com. In addition tocompany and detailed product information,the site features a Patient Center where vis-itors can click on an area of the humanbody to learn about ailments and suggestedAircast products. People can also contactAircast Customer Service at 1-800-526-8785 to speak with one of our knowledge-able representatives.

AIRCAST, INC.92 RIVER ROADSUMMIT, NJ 07902800-526-8785

WWW.AIRCAST.COM

Page 108: Training & Conditioning 14.4

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Circle No. 106

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Circle No. 107

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Are you prepared for sudden cardiac arrest?As a professional, you know your athletesdeserve the very best health care services.Although sudden cardiac arrest isunpredictable, you can prepare for it by havinga LIFEPAK CR Plus automated external defib-rillator (AED). With a LIFEPAK AED, you know

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Circle No. 108

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Circle No. 109

National Strength and Conditioning AssociationBridging the gap between science and application.

NSCA National Conference and ExhibitionMinneapolis, Minnesota • July 14 – 17, 2004

Bridging the gap between science and application…

Building for the future.

E very year the NSCA National Conference and Exhibition attracts over 1,500 of the finestprofessionals in the strength and conditioning industry. You will have the opportunity to

learn about innovative techniques that will enhance performance, reduce injury and advanceyour career. You will also be able to try out new equipment and discover the new technologies inyour field from nearly 200 targeted exhibitors in this action-packed four-day conference. TheNSCA will host a multitude of hands-on demonstrations and educational sessions, in addition to a reception in the exhibit hall with free food and libations.

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Page 109: Training & Conditioning 14.4

A T H L E T I C B I D . C O M ◆ T&C M A Y / J U N E 2 0 0 4 ◆ 107

THE HISTORY BEHIND THEPRO SHOX MOUTHGUARD

Dr. Kevin Cummings, D.D.S.,P.C., is a 1982 graduate ofthe University of Missouri –

Kansas CitySchool ofDentistryafter gradu-ating fromMissouriWestern in1977 with a

B.A. in Biology. He served asChief of Staff at KansasDental Centers from 1982until 1992. In 1990, he wasselected as Team Dentist forthe Kansas City ChiefsFootball Club. He currentlypractices in Lee’s Summit,Missouri, and has alsoopened a free Children’sClinic at St. Vincent’sOperation Breakthroughwhere he serves as Director.

Company Q& A

Cramer Sports Medicine was looking to cre-ate a safer mouthguard, and it turned to Dr.Kevin Cummings, team dentist of theKansas City Chiefs to come up with a solu-tion. The result is the ProShox Mouthguard,a comfortable mouthguard which is thickenough to help minimize the impact of abone-jarring hit to a football player andreduce the likelihood of a concussion. Dr.Cummings provides more information onthis innovative product.

Q. WHY IS THICKNESS AN IMPOR-TANT CHARACTERISTIC FOR AMOUTHGUARD?A mouthguard constructed of ethylene vinylacetate materials with the proper thicknesscan reduce the likelihood of a concussion.If the mouthguard is thick enough, it will actas a shock-absorber between the upper andlower set of teeth, thereby displacing thejoint and reducing the chance that the bonein front of the inner ear will be traumatizedand cause a jaw-related concussion.

However, a thick mouthguard may feel toobulky and be uncomfortable for the athleteto wear. We worked with Dupont on devel-oping a shock absorbing material with theright thickness, and we tested the prototypethoroughly. We came up with the rightmaterials and thickness so that it iscomfortable for the athlete and still thickenough to provide proper protection.

Q. HOW DOES THE PROSHOXCOMPARE TO A CUSTOMIZEDMOUTHGUARD?The ProShox offers the benefits of acustomized-fitting, dentist-fitting mouthguardat a lower price—without an expensive tripto the dentist. A mouthguard cutomized bya dentist would cost about $150. TheProShox provides a similar fit and protectionas a dentist-designed guard at a cost of

less than $20.

Q. HOW IS AN ATH-LETIC TRAINERABLE TOCUSTOMIZE THEPROSHOX FOR ASPECIFIC ATHLETE?The beauty behind theProShox is that it is fittedto the athlete in thesame manner that a den-tist would take upperteeth impressions, yetthe fitting can be done bythe athlete through thefamiliar “boil-and-bite”process. The ProShox iscontained in a carrier traywith a handle. The guardstays in the tray while itis heated. The handleallows the athlete to

make the type of impression that a dentistwould make, and this allows you to reallycustomize the piece to the athlete’s needsand comfort. No other mouthguard usesthis type of rigid tray to fit the athlete.

Q. WHAT INSTRUCTIONAL MATERI-ALS COME WITH THE PRODUCTTO ENSURE A PROPER FIT?Annother innovation behind the ProShox isthat each unit comes with an informationalCD-ROM that contains instructions for initial-izing the mouthguard so that it properly fitsthe athlete. The CD gives step-by-stepdirections on how to heat the ProShox andcreate the correct fit. No other mouthguardcomes with these types of instructions insuch an easy-to-apply format.

CRAMER PRODUCTS, INC.P.O. BOX 1001GARDNER, KS 66030913-856-7511

WWW.CRAMERSPORTSMED.COM

Page 110: Training & Conditioning 14.4

Specializing in CustomFoot Orthotics andFoot Related Suppliesfor Athletes"I’ve used Foot Management productsfor five years and will continue to usethem because of their quality workman-ship and customer service.”

Jason Miller, MS, ATCAthletic Trainer, University of

ConnecticutMen’s Basketball

"For over 25 seasons, I have used FootManagement’s products and services.

They have allour podiatricsupply needs,superb service,and always afriendly respon-sive voice at theother end of thephone. We keepcoming back;that’s atestament of our

satisfaction with Foot Management.”

Pepper Burruss, PT, ATCHead Athletic Trainer

Green Bay Packers

"We’ve been using Foot Management,Inc. for custom foot orthotics and footrelated supplies for over 20 years andplan on using them for years to come.”

John Spiker, PT, ATCPresident, HealthWorks Rehab & FitnessCo-coordinator of Athletic Training Services

West Virginia UniversityMorgantown, WV

Foot Management, Inc.7201 Friendship Road, Pittsville, MD [email protected]

WWW.FOOTMANAGEMENT.COM

“Thanks for helping uschange a life.”

"For the past 12 months I have beentraining Carrie, 30, who lives with cere-bral palsy. She has had numerous surg-eries including tendon relocation, twofemoral osteotomies and a hip replace-ment. When I was introduced to Carrieshe had received the news from herdoctors that she would soon needanother hip replacement but that itwould have to wait until the painbecame unbearable. To Carrie, that wassimply unacceptable.

“Over the past 12 months together,Carrie and I have employed an exerciseregimen based on the concepts broughtforth in NASM’s Integrated FlexibilitySpecialist Course. The results havebeen shocking. In Carrie's words, ‘Myback and hip pain has been reduced by80-90 percent and I have done some-thing that I haven't done in 20 years—walk again without the use of mycrutches.’

“On behalf of Carrie and myself, I wouldjust like to thank everyone at NASM forhelping us change a life.

“The picture of Carrie was taken on anaircraft carrier after she climbed 10flights of stairs to reach the flightdeck!”

Larry HustedNASM-CPT, NASM-IFS

National Academy of Sports Medicine (NASM)26632 Agoura Rd., Calabasas, CA [email protected]

WWW.NASM.ORG

TurfCordz Cuff Tuff forshoulder rehab andstrengthening

"I was concernedthat a minor shoul-der injury Isustained over thewinter wouldprevent me fromplaying softball thisyear. Along with myother exercises, Ibegan to workspecifically on my

shoulder using the TurfCordz Cuff Tuff,beginning with their medium resistancelevel and eventually working up to theirleaviest level. My arms and especiallymy shoulders feel stronger than ever,and I know that my workouts with theCuff Tuff helped significantly. We beginsoftball practice in a few weeks and I'mlooking forward to playing again!"

Jack WilsonStow Softball League

“TurfCordz has, by far, the best rubbertubing and training accessories outthere. I use them for ease of use andcost efficiency. Clips on the end of thetubing makes it a snap to change fromone resistance level to another. I foundto be the best you have to use thebest; that’s why I choose TurfCordz overany other rubberized tubing products.”

Craig Day, President2Days Body & Fitness

MF Athletic CompanyP.O. Box 8090, Cranston, RI [email protected]

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TurfCordz are distributed by MF Athletic Company

Page 111: Training & Conditioning 14.4

A T H L E T I C B I D . C O M ◆ T&C M A Y / J U N E 2 0 0 4 ◆ 109

Preventing lower jawinjuries

The Brain-Pad® mouthguard is unlikeupper only mouthguards. It protectsagainst lower jaw impact concussionsand skull fractures at the base of thebrain.

Its patented bimolar designstabilizes and secures the lower jaw,providing protection from impacts tothe helmet, facemasks and retentionsystems. The lower jaw is automatical-

ly reposi-tionedinto aslightlydown andforward

position creating a safety space at thebase of the skull and it is secured bythe upper/lower design. This greatlylessens the risk of the jaw slamminginto the base of the brain and othervital nerves and blood vessels locatedaround the jaw joint structure. TheBrain Pad protects the upper andlower teeth, fits over braces andincreases endurance by allowing ath-letes to breath through the moutheven while maintaining a stable jawposition.

See us at the NATA Show Booth No. 328.

Brain-Pad, Inc.322 Fayette Street, Conshohocken, PA [email protected]

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www.gssiweb.com

Athletes who are successful in sports that require explosive power and speed, like wrestling,gymnastics, swimming, or track & field, need to understand the importance of getting in opti-mum nutrients and fluids so their bodies can perform best when it really counts.

Fluids: Hydration for Peak Performance0 Dehydration can diminish energy and impair

performance. Even a 2-percent loss of body weightthrough sweat (i.e. 3 pounds for a 150-pound athlete)1,2 can put an athlete at a disadvantage. Inwarm weather or a hot gym, some athletes can lose more than a gallon of sweat during training or competition.

0 For peak performance, athletes need to replace what they lose in sweat – both fluid and electrolyteslike sodium and potassium.

Healthy Weight LossIn some explosive sports, competing at a certainweight is part of the game. Weigh-in deadlines andpressures aside, athletes should meet realistic weightgoals by choosing balanced nutrition plans. Here are afew considerations for athletes who want to loseweight:

0 Lose weight sensibly by aiming for no more than a 1 to 2 pound loss per week.

0 Consume 3,500 fewer calories each week (or500 calories a day) for a one-pound weeklyweight loss.

0 Decrease calories gradually (i.e., 250 calories a day)to prevent cutting energy intake dramatically.Athletes should also increase their exercise (an extra 20 to 30 minutes daily) to burn an additional250-500 calories per day.

0 Don’t dehydrate to make weight. Athletes should nottry to make weight by dehydrating themselves.Doing so decreases performance and can lead tomore serious and potentially life-threatening heatillnesses.

Fluid FundamentalsAthletes in explosive sports rely on their bodies toperform in intense bursts; dehydration is often anoverlooked problem. Athletes don’t realize dehydrationcan take a serious toll on the energy and mental focusthat are key to success. Here’s how to stay hydrated:

0 Remember fluids throughout the day. This may beas simple as grabbing a sports drink first thing inthe morning, then using fountains, coolers, andcafeteria beverages as triggers for drinking throughout the day. Bring fluids to practice.

0 Hydrate 2 to 3 hours before practices and competitions.Athletes should aim for at least 16 ounces (2 cups) offluid at this time and an additional 8 ounces (1 cup)10 to 20 minutes prior to competition.

0 Drink during workouts or competition. Sportsdrinks, like Gatorade®, can help ward off dehydrationand muscle cramps because they help replenishboth fluid and electrolytes (i.e., sodium and potassium) lost in sweat. Drink enough fluid duringa workout to minimize weight loss, without over-drinking.

Foods & Fluids Series: Volume I, EXPLOSIVE POWER SPORTS is one in a series of six sports science articles written by Susan Kundrat, M.S., R.D., L.D.,an expert in sports nutrition. Any of these articles can be reproduced for educational purposes to distribute to athletes, students, parents or to post in theathletic training room, locker room, or weight room.

How much weight they lose during exercise (in ounces)

+How much fluid they consume

during exercise (in fluid ounces)

=The amount they SHOULD drink

to replace sweat losses

Since sweat rates

can very based on

the individual,

weather, and

intensity of exercise,

athletes should

measure:

Athletes should know their sweat rates to help preventdehydration and other heat-related conditions.

Page 113: Training & Conditioning 14.4

Foods: Pre-Workout FuelAthletes should fuel their bodies 2 to 3 hours beforeworkouts and competitions with a high-carbohydratemeal or snack (see “Pre-Workout Meal Ideas”). Thecloser in time an athlete gets to competition, thesmaller the pre-competition meal or snack should be.

0 Plan a pre-competition meal with high-energy foods like bagels, cereals, pasta, vegetables andfruits. Athletes should fill 2/3 of their plates withhigh-carbohydrate foods and the rest with lean protein like chicken or turkey.

0 Take along snacks to eat between competition. In awrestling tournament, for example, an athlete maycompete throughout the day. Having quick, easy-to-digest foods available can help provide energyto the muscles and avoid hunger.

0 Replace the sodium lost in sweat — especially forheavy crampers. Athletes can do this by regularlysalting their food and eating some salty snacks like pretzels, crackers and soups.

Foods: Post-Workout FuelAthletes burn up muscle energy stores during a workout. So it’s important that athletes get energyback to the muscles within 30 minutes and again within 2 hours to help rebuild muscle energy storesfor the next bout or workout. Consume another mealwithin 2 hours.

Tournament Fueling

When there are several opportunities to compete inone day, athletes must plan ahead to build and maintain energy (glycogen) stores.

Time Sample Menu

6:30 am Breakfast: Oatmeal with lowfat/nonfat milk

BananaOrange juice

8:30 am Competition

9:00 am Snack Granola barOrange slicesSports drink

10:30 am Competition

11:00 am Snack Turkey sandwichGrapesWater

1:00 Competition

1:30 Snack YogurtGraham crackersExtra fluids

3:00 Competition

3:30 Snack Apple juice

4:30 Competition

5:00 Snack Peanut butter and crackersRaisinsSports drink

6:30 Dinner Grilled chicken breastPasta and marinara sauceSalad and lowfat dressingGreen beansSorbetLowfat/nonfat milkExtra fluids

Menu #1

Lean turkeysandwich

Baked chips

Orange slices

Lowfat/Nonfat milk

Menu #2

Pasta salad with veggies and lean ham

Grapes

Oatmeal cookies

Water and sports drink

Menu #3

Grilled chicken breast

Rice pilaf

Salad with lowfatdressing

Frozen yogurt

Fruit juice

Pre-Workout Meal Ideas

CONTACT: FOR MORE INFORMATION ON THE GATORADE SPORTS SCIENCE INSTITUTE (GSSI) LOG ON TO: www.gssiweb.com or call 1-800-616-GSSI (4774). FF-EPS

1 Gisfoli, C.V. and D.R. Lamb. Perspectives in Exercise Science and Sports Medicine:Fluid Homeostasis During Exercise, Chapt 1 pp. 1-38, 1990.

2 Gopinathan, P.M. et al. Arch Environ Health, 43:15-17, 1998.

Page 114: Training & Conditioning 14.4

Training & Conditioning is pleased to provide NATA members with the opportunity to earn continuing education units through reading issues of the magazine. The following quiz is based on articlesthat appear in this issue of Training & Conditioning. By satisfactorily completing the quiz and mailing it backto T&C, certified athletic trainers can earn two continuing education units.

INSTRUCTIONS: Fill in the circle on the Answer Form (on page 114) that represents your selection of thebest answer for each of the questions below. Complete the form at the bottom of page 114, include a $15payment to Training & Conditioning, and mail it to the following address: Training & Conditioning, ATTN: 14.4Quiz, 2488 N. Triphammer Road, Ithaca, NY 14850. Athletic trainers who correctly answer 70 percent of thequestions by June 30, 2004 will be notified of their earned credit by mail no later than July 15, 2004.

THE WRONG STUFF pages 13-21

Objective: Learning the risks associated with supplementcontamination and understanding the responsibilities ofathletes, athletic trainers, and manufacturers regardingsupplement safety.

1) According to the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act of 1994, dietary supplements are:

a) Closely monitored by the FDA.b) Not classified as drugs, so they are not under FDA

regulation.b) Required to list all ingredients and the amount of

each.c) Considered safe and effective.

2) A 2001 International Olympic Committee study found that 15 percent of tested supplements from around the world:

a) Were manufactured illegally.b) Had correct ingredients listed on the label. c) Contained steroid precursors that were not listed on

the label.c) Were available in the United States under multiple

labels.

3) Dr. Chris Rosenbloom suggests looking out for supple-ments that are labeled as_______________, which mimic the effects of anabolic steroids.

a) Prohormones.b) High protein.c) Biotin.d) Green Energy Blend.

4) Dr. Cooperman advises consumers to take a closer look at _______________.

a) Diuretics.b) Calcium tablets.c) Protein powders. d) Multivitamins.

5) Dr. Rosenbloom recommends making athletes:

a) Avoid supplements.b) Aware of your policy. c) Check ingredient lists.d) Choose their supplements independently.

6) According to Cindy Thomas, consumers have:

a) The ability to contact manufacturers of a product to obtain an exact ingredient list.

b) Confidence in the FDA’s regulatory system for dietarysupplements.

c) A guarantee that manufacturers are registered with the FDA.

d) No guarantee that a label accurately reveals what is or is not in a bottle.

7) Scott Strickland, relief pitcher for the New York Mets, was unable to:

a) Find a way to verify what was in his supplements.b) Increase body mass by 15 percent with dietary

supplements and weight training.c) Check bioavailability of his supplements.d) Identify any seals of approval for dietary

supplements.

AGILITY ANTICS pages 23-33

Objective: Learning how to use creative planning fordrills and weightroom sessions to address specific condi-tioning needs while keeping athletes motivated andenthusiastic about their workouts.

8) Steve Watterson invented wall ball for:

a) Improving ambidextrous abilities.b) Additional conditioning exercise.c) Improving coordination of baseball players.d) An in-season fun activity.

9) According to Cal Dietz, a big motivator for any type of drill is:

a) Having rewards.b) Verbal encouragement.c) Chasing or being chased.d) Showing outcomes.

10) Cal Dietz has athletes perform drills with as much intensity as possible and worries less about doing the drills with perfect technique for the following reason:

a) Time limitations.b) There is a learning curve.c) The drills are too complicated to master.d) In sports, nothing is done the same way each time.

112 ◆ T&C M A Y / J U N E 2 0 0 4 ◆ A T H L E T I C B I D . C O M

NATA CEUQUIZ

T&C May/June 2004 Vol. XIV, No. 4

Page 115: Training & Conditioning 14.4

11) Steve Watterson developed Powerball, which is a combination of:

a) Hockey, tennis, and soccer.b) Rugby, basketball, and dodgeball.c) Hockey, rugby, and baseball.d) Rugby, football, and baseball.

12) Peter Friesen utilizes lunges while catching a ball, and this results in better__________.

a) Core strength and functional flexibility. b) Lower extremity strength.c) Endurance.d) Foot speed.

13) Kevin Ebel and his staff make sure that before athletes attempt a drill, the athletes know:

a) How long the drill will last.b) What is expected of them and what targets to

focus on.b) What equipment will be needed.c) The surface that the drill will be performed on.

RACE AGAINST TIME pages 37-46

Objective: Understanding how best to manage thedemands of being an athletic trainer, and how toimprove professionally through better time management,planning, communication, and organization.

14) The first steps to effective time management are:a) Limiting job requirements.b) Starting your day at 6 a.m.c) Planning and scheduling.d) Delegating tasks.

15) According to the author, the key to having multiple certified athletic trainers share responsibilities effectively is:

a) Making time for communicating and scheduling.b) Having the director devise the master schedule.c) Having clear job descriptions.d) Keeping the ratio of ATCs to student-athletes near 1:20.

16) According to the author, one way to reduce an ATC’s workload is to:

a) Hire EMTs to cover home events.b) Request that coaches fill and maintain water coolersand bottles.c) Document weekly.d) Send athletes to off-campus clinics for rehab.

FROM BACK TO FRONT pages 49-54

Objective: Learning how to implement prehab, which isthe use of rehabilitation exercises by healthy athletes todecrease injury risks.

17) The Ohio State University found that football players had developed ___________, thus leaving them more vulnerable to injury.

a) Glucose depletion.b) Poor length-tension relationships of muscles.c) An increase in fast-twitch fibers.d) An imbalance between extrinsic and intrinsic mus-

culature in the shoulder.

18) The shoulder school specifically included a _____________ component.

a) Speed.b) Stretching.c) Maximum lift.d) Co-contraction.

19) Ohio State emphasizes ___________ exercises in its backschool.

a) Pelvic floor.b) Proprioceptive.c) Hip rotation.d) Pectoralis.

20) The main way to prevent hamstring injuries is to:

a) Perform dynamic stabilization.b) Perform co-contractions of hamstrings and

quadriceps.c) Isolate hamstring strengthening 0-80 degrees.d) Increase both strength and flexibility of the ham-

strings in relation to the quadriceps.

21) Which of the following is a part of Ohio State’s shoulder school exercises?

a) Triceps curls.b) No can lifts.c) Empty can lift.d) Full can lift.

22) According to the article, ankle school exercises should be performed:

a) At the end of workout sessions when fatigued.b) Daily.c) Consistently on the same surface.d) As a warm-up.

CENTER OF STRENGTH pages 91-97

Objective: Understanding the position-specific strengthand conditioning needs of basketball centers.

23) The dynamic warmup includes:

a) High repetition and low weight exercises.b) Yoga.c) Low repetition and high weight exercises.d) Dynamic and static stretching.

24) Agility is being able to:

a) Perform plyometrics.b) Quickly change direction and speed.c) Display explosive power.d) Post up strongly.

25) Which of the following is appropriate endurance training for basketball centers?

a) Long distance running.b) Moderate intensity exercises involving slow-twitch

fibers.c) Sustained, high intensity intervals.d) Treadmill running for 30 minutes at 4.5 mph.

ANSWER SHEET IS ON PAGE 114

NATA CEUQUIZ

A T H L E T I C B I D . C O M ◆ T&C M A Y / J U N E 2 0 0 4 ◆ 113

Page 116: Training & Conditioning 14.4

NATA CEU Quiz Answer Form

INSTRUCTIONS: Fill in the circle on the Answer Form below that represents your selectionof the best answer for each of the previous questions. Complete the form at the bottom ofthis page, include a $15 payment to Training & Conditioning, and mail it to the followingaddress: Training & Conditioning, ATTN: 14.4 Quiz, 2488 N. Triphammer Road, Ithaca, NY14850, no later than June 30, 2004. Athletic trainers that correctly answer 70 percent ofthe questions will receive two CEUs, and will be notified of their earned credit by mail nolater than July 15, 2004.

1. ❍ ❍ ❍ ❍2. ❍ ❍ ❍ ❍3. ❍ ❍ ❍ ❍4. ❍ ❍ ❍ ❍5. ❍ ❍ ❍ ❍6. ❍ ❍ ❍ ❍7. ❍ ❍ ❍ ❍

The Wrong Stuff

A B C D

Last Name_______________________________________First Name_________________________________MI______

Mailing Address______________________________________________________________________________________

City___________________________________________________State_________________Zip Code________________

Daytime Telephone_________________________________E-Mail Address____________________________________

Payment Information

__ $15 check or money order (U.S. Funds only) payable to: Training & Conditioning

__ Visa __ Mastercard __ Discover __ American Express

Account Number_______________________________________________Expiration Date________________________

Name on Card_____________________________________Signature__________________________________________

114 ◆ T&C M A Y / J U N E 2 0 0 4 ◆ A T H L E T I C B I D . C O M

8. ❍ ❍ ❍ ❍9. ❍ ❍ ❍ ❍

10. ❍ ❍ ❍ ❍11. ❍ ❍ ❍ ❍12. ❍ ❍ ❍ ❍13. ❍ ❍ ❍ ❍

Agility Antics

A B C D

14. ❍ ❍ ❍ ❍15. ❍ ❍ ❍ ❍16. ❍ ❍ ❍ ❍

Race Against Time

A B C D

17. ❍ ❍ ❍ ❍18. ❍ ❍ ❍ ❍19. ❍ ❍ ❍ ❍20. ❍ ❍ ❍ ❍21. ❍ ❍ ❍ ❍22. ❍ ❍ ❍ ❍

From Back To Front

A B C D

23. ❍ ❍ ❍ ❍24. ❍ ❍ ❍ ❍25. ❍ ❍ ❍ ❍

Center Of Strength

A B C D

Page 117: Training & Conditioning 14.4

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Page 118: Training & Conditioning 14.4

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The PTP provides resources and services for allsports medicine professionals.

Visit www.proteamphysicians.com to find a PTP doctor, ask a question of a PTP doctor, orexplore the educational materials from PTP regarding

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116 ◆ T&C M A Y / J U N E 2 0 0 4 ◆ A T H L E T I C B I D . C O M

Page 119: Training & Conditioning 14.4

Request No. 80 NATA Booth No. 100

Page 120: Training & Conditioning 14.4

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Request No. 81 NATA Booth No. 1314