Personalized Learning. Blended Learning Blended learning is a formal education program in which a student learns at least in part through online delivery.

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    16-Dec-2015

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<ul><li> Slide 1 </li> <li> Personalized Learning </li> <li> Slide 2 </li> <li> Blended Learning Blended learning is a formal education program in which a student learns at least in part through online delivery of content and instruction with some element of student control over time, place, path or pace. Clayton Christensen Institute </li> <li> Slide 3 </li> <li> Graphic courtesy Education Elements </li> <li> Slide 4 </li> <li> Graphic courtesy of Education Elements </li> <li> Slide 5 </li> <li> In-Class Rotation </li> <li> Slide 6 </li> <li> Flipped Classroom </li> <li> Slide 7 </li> <li> Flex Academy </li> <li> Slide 8 </li> <li> Potential Benefits of Blended Learning Personalized instruction with adaptive software Rich data for teachers to support students Growth paths for faster students Freeing of teachers for deeper and more meaningful learning </li> <li> Slide 9 </li> <li> Potential Benefits of Blended Learning Personalized instruction with adaptive software Rich data for teachers to support students Growth paths for faster students Freeing of teachers for deeper and more meaningful learning </li> <li> Slide 10 </li> <li> Challenges of Blended Learning Limited research yet Many competing products Implementations often mean a mixture of products Not all students can access from home </li> <li> Slide 11 </li> <li> Challenges of Blended Learning Full-on implementation requires rethinking of the structure of learning. Lots of hype around blended learning that needs to be filtered </li> <li> Slide 12 </li> <li> IT Implications Lots of devices Lots of bandwidth Lots of accounts Lots of data Lots of PD Integration with SIS Home access </li> <li> Slide 13 </li> <li> Open Educational Resources Open Educational Resources (OER) are teaching and learning materials that are freely available online for everyone to use, whether you are an instructor, student or self-learner. Examples of OER include: full courses, course modules, syllabi, lectures, homework assignments, quizzes, lab and classroom activities, pedagogical materials, games, simulations, and many more resources contained in digital media collections from around the world. OER Commons </li> <li> Slide 14 </li> <li> Potential Benefits of OER Costs savings Texts and resources stay up-to- date Teachers can have more direct involvement in curriculum design Breadth of resources to choose from </li> <li> Slide 15 </li> <li> Potential Challenges of OER Screening and evaluating Printing or depending on electronic delivery Teachers struggle to have time to be more involved in curriculum design Breadth of resources to choose from </li> <li> Slide 16 </li> <li> IT Implications Lots of devices Lots of bandwidth Lots of accounts Lots of data Lots of PD Integration with SIS Home access Learning management systems </li> <li> Slide 17 </li> <li> Smarter Balanced Assessment The Smarter Balanced Assessment is being developed by multi-state consortium to align to the Common Core State Standards in English Language Arts and Math. </li> <li> Slide 18 </li> <li> Smarter Balanced Assessment There are three components in the Smarter Balanced system: Digital Library Interim Assessments Summative Assessments </li> <li> Slide 19 </li> <li> Smarter Balanced Assessment The assessments are computer based, and will be adaptive Interim and summative tests are expected to have turnaround time in weeks, not months </li> <li> Slide 20 </li> <li> Slide 21 </li> <li> Potential Challenges of SBAC Demand for devices Demand for bandwidth Demand for time Demand for support staff Demand for professional development </li> </ul>

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