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Minnesota Online Teacher Induction Network Gillian Roehrig Barbara Billington STEM Education Center University of Minnesota

Minnesota Online Teacher Induction Network

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Minnesota Online Teacher Induction Network. Gillian Roehrig Barbara Billington STEM Education Center University of Minnesota. C urrent Teaching Force Trends. Ingersoll, 2012. Current Teaching Force Trends. - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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Page 1: Minnesota Online Teacher Induction Network

Minnesota Online Teacher Induction Network

Gillian RoehrigBarbara Billington

STEM Education CenterUniversity of Minnesota

Page 2: Minnesota Online Teacher Induction Network

Current Teaching Force Trends

Ingersoll, 2012

Page 3: Minnesota Online Teacher Induction Network

Current Teaching Force Trends

Ingersoll and Merrill, 2010

The new supply of science and mathematics teachers has more than kept up with this increase in demand

Page 4: Minnesota Online Teacher Induction Network

Current Teaching Force Trends

14% 24% 33% 40% 46%0%

10%

20%

30%

40%

50%

1st Year 2nd Year 3rd Year 4th Year 5th Year

Ingersoll, 2003; Ingersoll and Perda, 2012

Page 5: Minnesota Online Teacher Induction Network

Current Teaching Force Trends

Smith and Ingersoll, 2004

Basic Induction + Collaboration + Teacher Network + Extra Resources

Basic Induction + Collaboration

Basic Induction

No Induction

Page 6: Minnesota Online Teacher Induction Network

History of TIN

• 2005 – 2006 Face to Face and Online versions developed under a NSF TPC grant

• 2006 – 2008 STEMMP developed under grant from the Minnesota Department Education

• Project IMPACT (NSF Noyce) 2008 – 2012. Redesigned as Teacher Induction Network (TIN)

Page 7: Minnesota Online Teacher Induction Network

STEMMP

Rural Suburban

Urban Middle School

High School

AltSchool

Charter School

Science (38)

12 15 11 8 30 3 7

Math (13)

7 3 3 0 13 0 2

CTE (7)

3 2 2 1 6 0 0

STEMMP – statewide online induction program for secondary STEM teachers

Page 8: Minnesota Online Teacher Induction Network

STEMMP

Giving Resources and Advice to help survive

v. Developing Reflective, Practitioners to help

thrive

Structured Discussions v. Unstructured Discussions

Synchronous Communication

v. Asynchronous Communication

Credit v. No Credit

“Jack of all STEM” v. Targeted to one area

Page 9: Minnesota Online Teacher Induction Network

Teacher Induction Network (TIN)

• For credit onlyo Required for M.Ed. Completiono Required for all Noyce Scholars

Initial Licensure Coursework (37.5 credits)

Post Licensure Coursework(9 credits)

9 credits Science Methods3 credits Nature of Science12 credits of field-based practicum and student teachings

Online InductionEquity and Social JusticeFoundations of Science Education ORSpecial Topics Offering

Page 10: Minnesota Online Teacher Induction Network

Teacher Induction Network (TIN)Reflective JournalsMonthlyIndividual

Topical ResponseMonthlySmall GroupFacilitator topics

Venture-VexationMonthlySmall GroupIndividual topic

Professional Development InquiriesSemesterIndividual topic

Page 11: Minnesota Online Teacher Induction Network

The first day of teaching at XXXX for the 2011 – 2012 school year is complete. After having a year of teaching already behind me, the preparation for this year was much more productive. It felt a lot less chaotic, but somehow no less desperate. It seems that the new year begins with a strange mix of high-level policies and ground-level needs. We’ve been introduced to no less than three new positive behavior support frameworks, but we still don’t have enough chairs in our classrooms. We have a new technology support system that allows students to connect to our network with personal computers, but we have students who still don’t come to class equipped with basic school supplies. It seems that the district as a whole is working on a much higher level of Bloom’s taxonomy than the teachers. How does this kind of split occur? Since it seems to happen nearly every year, there must be something systemic that is causing this discrepancy between those on the ground and those in command.

Sep

tem

ber

Reflective Journals

Page 12: Minnesota Online Teacher Induction Network

I gave my first test on Thursday and corrected it and had it ready to hand back today. On the whole, the results were about what I expected. Several of my students surprised me with how well they did, but I could see a clear distinction between the students who use their class time effectively and those who need constant prompting to keep on task and get their work done.For Intro to Physics, we used a common assessment which the four of us who teach the class had written over the summer. While it seemed like a good test at the time, in retrospect, I’m not terribly happy with it, and neither is one of the other ITP teachers. It’s not awful, but I think there are probably better ways to test the concepts we’re trying to get at. I’m not sure how the other teachers will feel about it, but I’m in favor of getting rid of it almost entirely and starting over next year.

Sep

tem

ber

Reflective Journals

Page 13: Minnesota Online Teacher Induction Network

This month has felt like a slow burn. To date, this reflective journal has been the hardest to write. Part of that is the result of some serious exhaustion, and part of it is the result of my brain feeling wiped out by day’s end. I guess the hallmark of this month has been the accumulation of added duties at school. Everything from after-school supervisions to new PLC initiatives (and the endless meetings that accompany them) has slowly turned into a massive weight that must be carried in addition to what we teachers are already carrying. It’s more than clear that we are being given more and more things to do, but it’s equally clear that we are not given more time to do it. I feel it officially becomes ridiculous when my colleagues are calling in substitutes to teach their classes so they can work on all this other stuff in the office.I want to make educating our kids my top priority, and I can’t do that … •  

Feb

ruary

Reflective Journals

Page 14: Minnesota Online Teacher Induction Network

The ESL teacher and I have come up with some kind of plan that will hopefully satisfy the both of us. The real change has just been that we intend to spend a little time each week just going over the upcoming week. Personally I think it holds little value, but this is something he really wants so I guess I can try to make it happen. As I have said before I think this collaboration will get better with several years of being in place, but for me as a new teacher it is one more thing that has been a challenge. I think as he continues to become more comfortable with the content we will be able to operate more often as two equal parts in the team, but right now he is still learning the content, right along with his students, so it is hard for me to give him responsibilities to teach the material, or expect him to do so. We will continue to wade into different models over the years and it will likely look very different. Right now I think I am trying to include some opportunities for him to take his kids across the hall to work together at a different pace.… •  

Feb

ruary

Reflective Journals

Page 15: Minnesota Online Teacher Induction Network

 Month Topic

Sept Who are ? Where do you teach? How was first day of school? Rules and procedures?

Oct What are good mentoring practices? What are your experiences?

Nov Assessment. How are students doing? What are you doing to support struggling students?

Dec "Too Cool for School.“ Personal electronic devices in the classroom

Jan "Courage and the Researchers Gaze“ Reflecting on pedagogy

Feb Professional Development opportunities

March School funding, budgets, union action

Apr Write to a preservice teacher

May Course survey

Topical Responses

Page 16: Minnesota Online Teacher Induction Network

  

Venture-Vexation

Page 17: Minnesota Online Teacher Induction Network

• The challenge that I have encountered is with my 9th grade Physical Science students. Many of my students are not turning in assignments in on time and usually don't turn them in at all. This is a very important part of my class not only because it counts for 20% of their grade, but also so I can see the students' comprehension and address any misconceptions. When looking at my grade book, there are several students who have not submitted work from the last two units. This is an issue that needs attention because the principal has the ZAP (Zeroes Aren't Permitted) policy.

• I have the dubious honor of teaching five classes of 9th graders. These students come from a smattering of middle schools (two within the district, transfers, home schooled, parochial, etc.) and each student has a different idea of appropriate classroom behavior. This, combined with large class sizes (about 37 students), makes modeling appropriate high school behavior challenging. Moreover, when 20-odd sugar-fueled 9th graders decide to revolt, not even hulking out can rein them in and return the class to a studious environment.

Venture-Vexation

Page 18: Minnesota Online Teacher Induction Network

• At the end of the school year I am going to have my students do a rather large final project on animal behavior and present it to the class. I am in need of advice and recommendations as I want it to be a valuable learning experience for my students. I will allow them to choose their topic. We have watched a few clips from the Life series and students get absolutely enthralled with it, which is why I am going to have the project be on a particular animal and their behavior with each other and other organisms. I am doing this for my venture/vexation because this is the first project they will have done all year and I don’t know what to expect realistically from 10th graders being that it is my first year teaching and the first big project I have assigned

Venture-Vexation

Page 19: Minnesota Online Teacher Induction Network

Professional Development Inquiries

Danielson’s Framework for Professional Practice

1.Communicating clearly and accurately2.Using questioning and discussion techniques3.Engaging students in learning4.Providing feedback to students5.Demonstrating flexibility and responsiveness

(Danielson, 1996)

Page 20: Minnesota Online Teacher Induction Network

Professional Development Inquiries

Video enables teachers to remove themselves from the demands of the classroom and to step back and examine classroom events

(van Es & Sherin, 2008)

Page 21: Minnesota Online Teacher Induction Network

Research Questions

RQ 1:

What is the nature of beginning teachers’ reflective stances using a video annotation tool examining their own teaching practice?

RQ 2:

What is the nature of beginning teachers’ responses to colleagues using a video annotation tool?

Page 22: Minnesota Online Teacher Induction Network

MethodsParticipants

• 33 beginning teachers enrolled in TIN over the past three years, from 2009 – 2012

• 16 selected for study

Data Collection

• Professional Development documents

• Video Annotations

Page 23: Minnesota Online Teacher Induction Network

MethodsData Analysis

229 Annotations were coded for four dimensions:

• Annotation Topic (Pedagogy, Management, Communication, Student Behavior)

• Actor (Teacher, Student)

• Annotation Stance (“Learning to Notice Framework”)

• PDI Focus

Page 24: Minnesota Online Teacher Induction Network

MethodsLearning to Notice Framework (van Es & Sherin, 2002)

• Describe: refers to statements that recounted the events and action related to the annotation

• Evaluate: refers to statements in which the teachers commented on what was good or bad or could have been done differently

• Interpret: refers to statements in which the teachers made inferences about what they noticed and connect to educational theory

• Addition of Explain

Page 25: Minnesota Online Teacher Induction Network

Methods“Again I am giving the student the opportunity to talk amongst themselves first so that they are better prepared, more confident, and hopefully then more participatory when we come back together as a class. Does it take more class time? In a way, and their is a risk of off task behavior, but it really makes more more meaningful discussions.!”

1. Annotation Topic: (CM, Pedagogy, Communication, Student Behavior)

2. Actor: (Teacher, Student)

3. Annotation Stance:(Describe, Explain, Evaluate, Interpret)

4. PDI Focused: (Yes or No)

Page 26: Minnesota Online Teacher Induction Network

Results (RQ 1)#

of

An

nota

tion

s

Cohort Year

Topic

Page 27: Minnesota Online Teacher Induction Network

Results (RQ 1)#

of

An

nota

tion

s

Cohort Year

Stances

Page 28: Minnesota Online Teacher Induction Network

Results (RQ 1)

Learning to Notice Framework

Reflective Practitioner Spectrum

Beginning(4)

Developing(4)

Developed(8)

Describe151

Explain107

Evaluate68

Interpret22

.An

nota

tion

sTeach

ers

Page 29: Minnesota Online Teacher Induction Network

Peer Responses (RQ 2)

Data Analysis

239 Peer Response Annotations

• Relate to your own experiences

• Pose a question (to the colleague)

• Make a suggestion (to the colleague)

• Praise and/or agreement

• Summarization

Page 30: Minnesota Online Teacher Induction Network

“I agree that it would be nice to have the students leading the charge a bit more in the calculations, but I also know how difficult it is to manage such post-lab time on a lab day. If the students were to 'go to the board' and analyze the reaction, would valuable hands on time be lost back in the lab?

1.Relate to own experiences

2.Pose a question

3.Make a suggestion

4.Praise and/or agreement

5.Summarization

Peer Responses (RQ 2)

Page 31: Minnesota Online Teacher Induction Network

“I have similar debates with myself...how much do the kids need to be guided with their note taking. They like it to be very clear what they need to write down, but I agree they need to start learning how to pick out what is important...they will need that skill in college. I often use a skeletal note, because it jut makes my life easier, and it also helps ELL and SpEd too!”

1.Relate to own experiences

2.Pose a question

3.Make a suggestion

4.Praise and/or agreement

5.Summarization

Peer Responses (RQ 2)

Page 32: Minnesota Online Teacher Induction Network

# o

f A

nn

ota

tion

sResults (Part 2)

Page 33: Minnesota Online Teacher Induction Network

A missed opportunity?

VideoAnt does not have a notification system to alert users to new content related to their video

Neither teachers nor instructors have any way of determining if the teacher ever read the peer response

???

Page 34: Minnesota Online Teacher Induction Network

Conclusions

Providing carefully scaffolded virtual spaces for beginning science teachers to further develop and reflect upon classroom teaching in action is important

Video annotation provides educational, social, & technological affordances that allow for the development of reflective practitioners in an online induction program.

van Es & Sherin’s Framework applies to online spaces

Page 35: Minnesota Online Teacher Induction Network

Questions?

AcknowledgementsJoel Donna, Mary HoelscherTasneem Anwar, Josh Ellis, Justin McFadden

For more information:Gillian Roehrig [email protected] Billington [email protected]