LEADERSHIP DIALOGUES Improving outcomes for all. LEADERSHIP DIALOGUES Leadership Dialogues Executive Summary The context or the Leadership Dialogues Odyssey

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Leadership dialoguesImproving outcomes for all110/07/2015Leadership dialoguesExecutive summaryLeadership DialoguesJanuary 2014 - July 2015Silcock, R. (2015) Leading Innovation: Research Paper. [Unpublished paper] Academy for Innovation/University of West LondonActive engagement and collaboration will improve teaching quality over time.A 360 view of teaching quality over time provides an accurate measure of how a teacher is performing.For professional learning to be effective, teachers need to be at a given level of competency.Teacher mindset determines if a teacher can transition from RI to good teaching quality over time.Leadership directly impacts on outcomes for all.Mode 2 professional learning: a professional learning environment characterised by inquiry, formal and informal dialogue and collaboration.Dialogic school: a school which promotes improved outcomes for all by employing precise, context-driven and collaborative leadership to create a professional learning environment characterised by inquiry, formal and informal dialogue and collaboration.

10/07/20153contextOffice for Standards in Education (2013) School Inspection Report: Primary School A. URN: 131183. London: Ofsted publicationsSilcock, R. (2015) Leading Innovation: Research Paper. [Unpublished paper] Academy for Innovation/University of West LondonThis Ofsted recommendation for Primary School A initially comprised the research project aims and intended impact. It led to a hypothesis which asserted the relationship between a model of continuing professional development which personalised professional learning and an increase in outstanding teaching.The initial phase of the research project focused on an iterative cycle of data collection and analysis leading to interim findings which broadened the scope of the research project. Improving teaching quality over time became the aim, with an emphasis on the teacher being a designer of learning not just a deliverer of a curriculum. The prerequisite for this being a professional learning environment characterised by inquiry, dialogue and collaboration. Given this, the intended impact became the creation of a dialogic school which would promote improved outcomes for both children and teachers.A change in context during the second phase afforded the Leadership Dialogues research project the opportunity to employ the case study method. A further iteration of the cycle of data collection and analysis led to a revision of the interim findings, a transitioning from internal to external validity and a move towards generalisability.However, the consideration of cultural and micro-political issues during this phase of the research project introduced further areas for research and broadened its scope: what are the barriers to change in teachers requiring improvement and how is the role of leadership integral to improving outcomes for both children and teachers? These questions will define the final phase of the research project.10/07/20154hypothesis

For schools to ensure quality of teaching over time, they need to build capacity in designing learning around all learners needs. This shift from the school as deliverer of the curriculum for children to the school as designer of learning for all requires the engagement of all in action focused on learning.Silcock, R. (2015) Leading Innovation: Research Paper. [Unpublished paper] Academy for Innovation/University of West LondonPrimary pupils artwork unveiled at Kidbrooke by the Mayor of Greenwich ahead of construction beginning on expanded school site for Primary School B, December 2014.The methodological frameworkCohen, L., Manion, L. and Morrison, K. (2011) Research Methods in Education. RoutledgeHorst, H., Hjorth, L. and Tacchi, J. (2012) Rethinking ethnography: An introduction. Media International Australia, Incorporating Culture and Policy 145 (2012): 86Silcock, R. (2014) The Case for Change: Research Paper. [Unpublished paper] Academy for Innovation/University of West London10/07/20156The methodological frameworkPiecing together the evidence of teaching quality over timeLearning journey evident in booksQuality of childrens learning matched by quality and frequency of feedback markingPupil attainment and progress data over a term and over a yearNo gaps in progress or attainment for groupsQuality of the learning environment and how it supports learningBreadth and balance of curriculumQuality of behaviour for learningWhat this tells us about attitudes to learning, engagement and established routinesPupil perceptions of learningWhat they say about the quality of teaching over timeQuality of observed teachingThe manner in which the teacher reads the context and adapts teaching to engage learnersEnrichmentTo what extent is learning enriched across the curriculumSilcock, R. (2014) Inquiry for Impact: Research Paper. [Unpublished paper] Academy for Innovation/University of West London10/07/20157The methodological frameworkEvidenceMethodWeaknessLearning journey evident in booksObservationWill the expectation of a book scrutiny impact on the learning journey evident in books?Pupil attainment and progress data over a term and over a yearSchool performance dataSchool performance data is based on teacher assessments and is not indicative of attitudes to learning.Quality of the learning environment and how it supports learningPhotographsPhotographic evidence will only record the potential for the learning environment to support learning.Quality of behaviour for learningObservation/School performance dataAn observer in a classroom will impact on the environment.Pupil perceptions of learningQuestionnaireWill pupils feel encouraged to be honest?Quality of observed teachingObservationAn observer in a classroom will impact on the environment.EnrichmentQuestionnaireWill stakeholders feel encouraged to be honest?Silcock, R. (2014) Inquiry for Impact: Research Paper. [Unpublished paper] Academy for Innovation/University of West LondonAn assessment model using a mix of qualitative and quantitative research methods built around the tool of observation (weaknesses countered).10/07/20158Ethical issuesHammersley, M. and Traianou, A. (2012) Ethics and Educational Research. British Educational Research Association on-line resource. Available at http://www.bera.ac.uk/ [accessed January 2014]Silcock, R. (2014) Inquiry for Impact: Research Paper. [Unpublished paper] Academy for Innovation/University of West LondonSilcock, R. (2015) Leading Innovation: Research Paper. [Unpublished paper] Academy for Innovation/University of West LondonThe leadership for learning modelThe theoretical framework

Leadership cultureTell less, ask more: the exposure of all stakeholders to inquiry, dialogue and collaboration will promote the desired culture of telling less and asking more and the corollary of relationship buildingLeadership relationshipsFor all stakeholders: the building of relationships underpins the success of every complex social organisation susceptible to an array of both external and internal influences, including schoolsLeadership structureA transparent leadership structure: defines accountabilities that will fuel school improvement both internally and externallyLeadership systemsPrecise leadership systems: leadership systems present the tangible realisation of cognitive politicsLeadership learningAction focused on learning: all stakeholders need to be provided with the opportunity to learn which will promote critical thinking and a focus on change; a prerequisite for responding to the increased complexity of social lifeSilcock, R. (2015) Leading Innovation: Research Paper. [Unpublished paper] Academy for Innovation/University of West LondonContextualising the leadership for learning model should serve to emphasise the key components of it. At both Primary School A and Primary School B leaders have successfully managed meaning and created a shared reality by embedding a leadership culture which is focused on telling less and asking more. This leads to the building of leadership relationships for all stakeholders. A transparent leadership structure and precise leadership systems support the management of meaning and maintain the shared reality. Focusing action on leadership learning secures a shared moral purpose.1010/07/2015The leadership for learning modelThe evidence

Leadership cultureInformed by data from the final phase of the research project which is indicative of the impact of leaders on teacher mindset and on outcomes for all stakeholdersLeadership relationshipsSupported by the data and the subsequent finding from the initial and second phase of the research project which states that active engagement for teachers within a context of personalised professional learning will lead to an improvement in teaching quality over time; teachers being able to take a lead in their professional learningLeadership structure/Leadership systemsDesigned following the data and the subsequent finding from all phases of the research project which advocates a 360 view of teaching quality over time; supports the management of meaning and maintains the shared realityLeadership learningSupported by the data and the subsequent finding from the initial and second phase of the research project which states that active engagement for teachers within a context of personalised professional learning will lead to an improvement in teaching quality over time; promotes a shared moral purposeSilcock, R. (2015) Leading Innovation: Research Paper. [Unpublished paper] Academy for Innovation/University of West LondonIn effect, teachers being afforded the opportunity to take a lead in their professional learning, the corollary of which is children being afforded the opportunity to take a lead in their learning leads to improved outcomes for all.This is because the assessment model which facilitates a