Forecasting Profitability - University of California, Davis 2017-04-11آ  fx fx fx fx gg b b ... Forecast

  • View
    2

  • Download
    0

Embed Size (px)

Text of Forecasting Profitability - University of California, Davis 2017-04-11آ  fx fx fx fx gg b b ......

  • Forecasting Profitability Mark Rosenzweig, Yale University Christopher Udry, Yale University

    September, 2013

  • • news: ag profits depend on weather • Huge literature in development economics on

    • ex post mechanisms for dealing with risk • ex ante consequence of uninsured risk for investment,  production, household organization choices

    • Little work on reducing risk via better forecasting • a.f. insurance permits farmers to ignore risk: chose  production to max expected profits

    • Perfect forecasting is even better: permits the farmer to  make optimal production choices conditional on the  realized weather

  • • Lots of qualitative evidence that farmers demand  forecasts

    • IMD forecast + national Monsoon Mission  • “New” ICRISAT VDSA surveys 2005‐11 (but  ongoing…) show CV of prep/planting investment of  54%%

    • Lagged profits (+credit constraints/risk) • Lagged rain (moisture overhang) • Changing input prices, expected output prices • Changing expectations of weather realizations

  • • Need to know returns to investment, technological  innovation, interventions

    • In agriculture, these depend on realization of  stochastic events, most obviously weather

    • Well‐identified estimates of returns tend to be from  a single season, in a small region

    • Karlan et al (2013) • Foster Rosenzweig AER (1996) • Duflo, Kremer, Robinson AER (2011) • Banerjee et al (2013); Bloom et al (2012), de Mel et al  (2008, 2009)

  • • Reforms, Weather and Productivity in China • Lin (AER 1992) argues that ag output in China increased  by 50% as a consequence of reforms

    • Estimates based on a production function, with before/after  years

    • But weather variation also matters for productivity • Zhang and Carter (AJAE 1997) show that chance  improvements in weather over the reform period also  matter.

    • They attribute 38% of growth to reforms

  • • Std errors substantially overstate precision of  return estimates

    • Broad geographic scope can provide variation, but  now we are worried that unobserved attributes  may be correlated with weather realizations

    • Panel data

  • What we do • Model

    • Risk‐averse farmers optimally respond to forecasts • How do these responses vary by skill of forecast?

    • Use long‐range forecasts of IMD + Panel Data on  farmers

    • Assess the geographical variation in skill of forecast • Estimate returns to planting stage investments

    • By rainfall realization • Key instrument is the IMD long range forecast

    • Show responsiveness of investment to forecast, interacted  with skill

    • Use simulations to show return to improvements in forecast  skill, with and without climate change

    • Implications for design of insurance

  • Modelling weather risk and  forecasts

    • Land prep/planting investment x  • • with

    { , }S b g ( )prob S b  

    ( )sf x

    ( )( ) gb f xf x x x

     

     

    ( ) ( )b gf x f x

  • • Forecasts! B or G before x is chosen prob(S=b|B)=prob(S=g|G)=q

    • Hence the problem, conditional on forecast F is

    • Subject to

    0 1 1

    ,a max ( ) prob( | F) ( ) prob( | F) ( )b gx u c S b u c S g u c   

    0c Y x a   1 ( )s sc f x ra 

  • Choices of a and x satisfy

    0 1 1'( ) '( ) (1 ) '( ) 0gbb g ffu c qu c q u c

    x x 

             

     0 1 1'( ) '( ) (1 ) '( ) 0.b gu c r qu c q u c    

  • • Proposition 1: A risk‐averse farmer chooses lower  levels of planting‐season inputs then would a profit‐ maximizing farmer.

  • • Profit max would imply

    • Risk averse farmer insists on expected return to x  greater than r.  From the FOC for a and x:

    hence

    (1 ) .gb ffq q r

    x x 

        

     1 1 1 1

    1 1

    '( ) (1 ) '( ) '( ) (1 ) '( )

    '( ) (1 ) E '( )

    gb b g b g

    gb

    ffr qu c q u c qu c q u c x x

    ffqEu c q u c x x

         

      

        

    (1 ) .gb ffr q q

    x x 

        

  • • Proposition 2: Planting period inputs are larger and  net savings smaller after a forecast of good rainfall  compared to a forecast of bad rainfall.

  • Follows directly from comparative statics of the FOC  for a and x

    Similar exercise shows a rises with q. 

     

     

    2 1 1 1 1 0

    1 1 1 1 0

    ''( ) (1 ) ''( ) ''( ) '( ) '( ) ( | ) 1

    det ''( ) (1 ) ''( ) ''( ) '( ) '( )

    0

    gb b g b g

    gb b g b g

    ffr qu c q u c u c u c u c x xdx q B

    dq ffr qu c q u c u c r u c u c x x

     

     

                                      

  • Since prob(S=b|B)=prob(S=g|G)=q,

    so

    and with q>0.5, x(q|G)>x(q|B).

    Analogous reasoning shows a(q|G)

  • • Proposition 3: The increase in investment with a  forecast of good weather (compared to a forecast  of bad weather) is larger as forecast skill improves.

  • We showed above that 

    Hence

    ( ( | ) 0d x q G dq

    ( ( | B) 0d x q dq

    ( ( | ) ( ( | ) 0.d x q G d x q B dq dq

     

  • • Proposition 4: If farmers have decreasing absolute  risk aversion, then despite the smoothly‐operating  credit/savings market, input use is higher for  farmers with higher initial assets Y. The response of  input use to forecasts varies by initial assets.

  • The first inequality depends on DARA; the second  inequality relies on proposition 1.  The same  arguments hold after a forecast of good weather.

    0 1 1

    0 1 1

    0 1

    ( | ) ''( ) ''( ) (1 ) ''( ) det

    ''( ) ''( ) (1 ) ''( ) det

    ''( ) ''( ) (1 ) det

    gb b g

    gb b b

    gb b

    fdx q B ru c fqu c r q u c r dY x x

    fru c fqu c r q u c r x x

    fru c u c fq r q r x x

                                       

                 0

       

      

  • • Proposition 5: Suppose complete irrigation  eliminates rainfall risk. Then as the skill of the  forecast increases, the difference in the  responsiveness of farmers with and without  irrigation to a forecast of good weather increases.

  • With irrigation, so x(q|G)=x(q|B).  By prop 3, as skill of forecast  increases, difference in responsiveness of farms with  and without irrigation to a forecast of good weather  grows. 

    ( ) ( ).g bf x f x

  • • Proposition 6: Farmers who live in riskier  environments will invest less in inputs, respond  differently to forecasts, and respond differently to  the skill of forecasts.

  • Need new notation and let prob of good weather be  1/2:

    An increase in γ is a mean preserving spread

     ( ) ( ) , ( ) ( )g g b bf x f x f x f x    

  • The inequality follows because 

    1 10( ) ''( ) ''( ) (1 ) ''( ) det(B)

    0.

    gb b g

    fdx B u c fqu c r q u c r d x x

     

                       

    ( )( ) gb f xf x r x x

      

     

  • • Proposition 7: Expected profits and expected utility  increase with forecast skill.

  • Let the probability of good weather be .5 Then

    1st 2 terms are positive by direct effect of matching;  2nd 2 terms by effect of improved forecasts on  reducing risk

    ( ) 2 ( ( | )) ( ( | )) ( ( | B)) ( ( | B))

    ( ( | ))( | ) ( ( | ))(1 )

    ( ( | ))( | ) ( ( | )) (1 )

    0

    g b b g

    g b

    gb

    dE profits f x q G f x q G f x q f x q dq

    f x q Gdx q G f x q Gq r q r dq x x

    f x q Bdx q B f x q Bq r q r dq x x

              

                      