Dolcissimo sospiro - Naxos Music Library .Vegard Lund – theorbe/lute/baroque guitar Shalev Adel

  • View
    218

  • Download
    0

Embed Size (px)

Text of Dolcissimo sospiro - Naxos Music Library .Vegard Lund – theorbe/lute/baroque...

  • Dolcissimo sospiro is baroque in the use of 'clair-obscur', a technique also employed in painting and sculpture of the earlybaroque era. Love and joy are juxtaposed with pain and death,and the 'sweetest sighs' of the title are ones of hope and despair.

    We are in early 17th century Italy. Composers such as Caccini,Monteverdi, Merula and d'India have all written music to thepoetry of, among others, Ottavio Rinuccini. And Ron Ford's composition Rinuccini connects it with our time.

    Dolcissimo Sospiro er barokk, preget av den samme clairobscur-effekt som man kan observere i datidens maleri og skulptur.Kjrlighet og glede spiller opp mot smerte og dd, og tittelenste sukk uttrykker bde hp og fortvilelse.

    Vi befinner oss i Italia p 1600-tallet. Komponister som Caccini,Monteverdi, Merula og dIndia har tonesatt tekster av blantandre Ottavio Rinuccini. Linjene trekkes til vr egen tid i Ron Fords verk Rinuccini.

    Tone Wik sopranoVegard Lund theorbe/lute/baroque guitarShalev Adel harpsichordBjarte Eike baroque violin Sigyn Fossnes baroque violinGunnar Hauge baroque cello

    Made in Norway 2003 Lindberg Lyd AS

    19

    *!0E1I8I-faedca!

    Caccini

    Monteverdi

    d India

    Merula

    Ford

    Tone Wik

    Dolcissimo sospiro

  • Introduction

    In the dedication of the libretto that Ottavio Rinuccini wrote forJacopo Peris lEuridice in 1601, he stated: It has been the opin-ion of many that the ancient Greeks and Romans sang the entiretragedies on the stage. A few years before the Florentine poet,librettist and courtier had been involved in writing the words toDafne by the same composer, the very first drama ever to besung in its entirety in the manner of the ancients.

    Peris new style of recitar cantando was the fruit of a search fora manner of singing, like that of the ancient tragedy, which wasneither speech nor song but something in between. Peri thusrealized an imitation of heightened speech. The voice was nothindered by contrapuntal obligation to other parts, as had beenthe case in the polyphonic music until the second half of the sixteenth century. Instead, the solo voice accompanied by a bassline in the new monody was free to declaim the text accordingto spoken accents and durations, speeding up and slowing downin imitation of the character and passion.

    Back to Ottavio Rinuccini: was it truly generally believed thatancient tragedies were sung in their entirety? It may have seemed so in the Florentine cameratas or academies, importantgroups of intellectuals who gathered to discuss literature, science and the arts. Already a member of the AccademiaFiorentina, Rinuccini in 1586 joined another Florentine academy,the Alterati. The members of the Alterati were particularly interested in dramatic theory and music, and had great influenceon the development of the monody and the dramma per musica,the opera.

    Dolcissimo sospiro

    1. Piangono al pianger mio* (3:51) Sigismondo dIndia (15821629)2. Diana (2:58) Sigismondo dIndia3. Nativit di Christo (3:26) Biagio Marini (15971665)4. Canzonetta spirituale sopra

    alla nanna: Hor ch tempo di dormire (7:21) Tarquino Merula (15951665)

    5. Ohim chio cado (4:45) Claudio Monteverdi (15671643)6. Aria di Ciaconna: Su la cetra

    amorosa (7:35) Tarquino Merula7. Aria, A una voce. Villanella (1:51) Paulo Quagliati (15551621)8. Filli, mirando il cielo* (2:51) Giulio Caccini(15501618)9. Dolcissimo sospiro* (2:05) Giulio Caccini10. Non hal ciel cotanti lumi* (3:26) Giulio CacciniRinuccini Ron Ford (1959)11. Caro e soave legno* (3:48)12. Bellissima Regina* (4:47)13. Udite, udite, amanti* (2:16)14. Occhimmortali* (4:19)15. Intenerite voi, lacrime mie* (3:28)16. Dolcissimo sospiro* (3:07)17. O miei giorni fugaci* (2:22)* lyrics by Ottavio Rinuccini (15621621)

    Tone Wik sopranoVegard Lund theorbe/lute/baroque guitar (1, 36, 917) Shalev Adel harpsichord (28, 10) Bjarte Eike baroque violin (3, 5, 1017) Sigyn Fossnes baroque violin (5, 1117) Gunnar Hauge baroque cello (36, 1117)

    32

  • Introduction

    In the dedication of the libretto that Ottavio Rinuccini wrote forJacopo Peris lEuridice in 1601, he stated: It has been the opin-ion of many that the ancient Greeks and Romans sang the entiretragedies on the stage. A few years before the Florentine poet,librettist and courtier had been involved in writing the words toDafne by the same composer, the very first drama ever to besung in its entirety in the manner of the ancients.

    Peris new style of recitar cantando was the fruit of a search fora manner of singing, like that of the ancient tragedy, which wasneither speech nor song but something in between. Peri thusrealized an imitation of heightened speech. The voice was nothindered by contrapuntal obligation to other parts, as had beenthe case in the polyphonic music until the second half of the sixteenth century. Instead, the solo voice accompanied by a bassline in the new monody was free to declaim the text accordingto spoken accents and durations, speeding up and slowing downin imitation of the character and passion.

    Back to Ottavio Rinuccini: was it truly generally believed thatancient tragedies were sung in their entirety? It may have seemed so in the Florentine cameratas or academies, importantgroups of intellectuals who gathered to discuss literature, science and the arts. Already a member of the AccademiaFiorentina, Rinuccini in 1586 joined another Florentine academy,the Alterati. The members of the Alterati were particularly interested in dramatic theory and music, and had great influenceon the development of the monody and the dramma per musica,the opera.

    Dolcissimo sospiro

    1. Piangono al pianger mio* (3:51) Sigismondo dIndia (15821629)2. Diana (2:58) Sigismondo dIndia3. Nativit di Christo (3:26) Biagio Marini (15971665)4. Canzonetta spirituale sopra

    alla nanna: Hor ch tempo di dormire (7:21) Tarquino Merula (15951665)

    5. Ohim chio cado (4:45) Claudio Monteverdi (15671643)6. Aria di Ciaconna: Su la cetra

    amorosa (7:35) Tarquino Merula7. Aria, A una voce. Villanella (1:51) Paulo Quagliati (15551621)8. Filli, mirando il cielo* (2:51) Giulio Caccini(15501618)9. Dolcissimo sospiro* (2:05) Giulio Caccini10. Non hal ciel cotanti lumi* (3:26) Giulio CacciniRinuccini Ron Ford (1959)11. Caro e soave legno* (3:48)12. Bellissima Regina* (4:47)13. Udite, udite, amanti* (2:16)14. Occhimmortali* (4:19)15. Intenerite voi, lacrime mie* (3:28)16. Dolcissimo sospiro* (3:07)17. O miei giorni fugaci* (2:22)* lyrics by Ottavio Rinuccini (15621621)

    Tone Wik sopranoVegard Lund theorbe/lute/baroque guitar (1, 36, 917) Shalev Adel harpsichord (28, 10) Bjarte Eike baroque violin (3, 5, 1017) Sigyn Fossnes baroque violin (5, 1117) Gunnar Hauge baroque cello (36, 1117)

    32

  • personal publications were of three-part canzonettas. He showedhimself an enthusiast for the lighter secular forms such as thearia and villanella. These forms proved to be ever so importanttexturally for the emerging baroque style. Quagliatis most substantial secular work is La sfera armoniosa, which comprises25 solos and duets with a concerted violin part. In all his worksQuagliati used clear harmonies and a graceful and simple melodic style. Contrary to his contemporaries he adopted a care-ful approach to the treatment of dissonance.

    Tarquinio Merula is one of the few composers of the period to be highly regarded for both his vocal and instrumental music.Merula was trained in Cremona, and spent some time as far afield as Poland. His style combines dense harmony with anexpansive vocal treatment, and was especially original in its synthesis of vocal and instrumental forms. As in the well-knownSu la cetra amorosa, a light and merry aria over a ground-likebass. Merulas Canzonetta spirituale and Biagio Marinis Nativitdi Christo are the only non-secular works on this recording.Marini published numerous volumes of secular and instrumentalmusic. The instrumental chamber music is most important for its development of the sonata form, often containing ostinatoelements and prefatory slow sections.

    The great Claudio Monteverdi hardly needs any introduction. Inhis fifth book of madrigals he launched the idea that words wereto be the mistress of the harmony and not the servant: under-lining the difference between the music of the older contra-puntal style (prima prattica) and his own highly modern style(seconda prattica). Monteverdi didnt publish a great many ofthe more popular kinds of solo songs, but surviving examples

    54

    Because notes were seen as the body of the music, and words asthe soul, a poet like Rinuccini became a key figure in the newstyle. A highly modern style, in which he adopted many conven-tions from the major lyric poets of the day, and developed themtowards a unique and refined kind of verse freely rhyming and designed to imitate the emotions and accents of speech. No wonder that many contemporary composers considered hispoems as highly appropriate vehicles for their music.

    Perhaps the most well known composer who adopted themodern ideas of the Florentine cameratas was singer-composerGiulio Caccini. The introduction to his famous song collections Le nuove musiche (1601) and Musiche nuove (1614) serve as a detailed model for the interpretation of solo music for voice inthe early seventeenth century. Caccini not only described themanner and style of singing as to move the affect of the soul,but also paid detailed attention to the embellishments (writing it down exactly as it is sung) and the ideal voice types for hiswork. Caccinis monodic airs and madrigals put forward a newmodel for vocal lyricism. His poetic preferences many ofRinuccinis poems are found in the two bundles reflect thehumanistic bend of the cameratas. Dolcissimo sospiro is baroquein its clair-obscure that one can also rec