17. baroque in italy and spain

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Warm-Up 2/08/12Describe the process by which you completed your Sistine chapel tile. Be specific in detail. Think about the aesthetic of just your tile. What does it look like to you? Pretend you do not know the context.

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The Baroque in Italy and Spain

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Practice Outline

1. Cultural attitudes about women are often revealed in art.Select and fully identify two works of art that depict one or more women. The works must come from two different cultures, one of which must be from beyond the European tradition. Explain how each work reveals its cultures attitudes about women. (30 minutes)

The Baroque in Italy and Spain

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Historical Context: 17th CenturyContinual Warfare: Thirty Yearss War (1618-1648) between France and The Hapsburgs (everywhere else)Treaty of Westphalia ended the warGermany is left in ruins, Netherlands begins a new war with England and France until 1679Expansion of the SciencesThe artist begins to depart from the philosopher (Descartes cogito ergo sum) as well as mathematics (calculus and abstractions)Keplar, Copernicus, GalileoUnderstanding the LAWS of nature, not its SECRETS

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Historical Context: Baroque ArtBaroque Art and Imagery flourishes despite warfare and divergence from philosophyIndependent of military imagery and influenceEven though math is a separate vocation, Baroque art is heavily influenced by the new mechanics and metaphysics of a developing scientific humanism.Baroque Art will NOT be neo-platonic (which dominated the philosophy of the Renaissance). Why?

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Back to Rome: 1600sThe papacy increased patronage as a continued tradition of counter-reformation ideals (soon winding down)Many artists in Rome were inconspicuous mannerists, sought the Late Northern Italian Realists paintersCaravaggio is credited with the early development of the Baroque Style

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Caravaggio: Early LifeMichelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio (1571-1610) born in Milan to an Architect and decoratorBarely escaped the plague that killed his father in 1577Connections with the Sforzas in MilanBegan four year apprenticeship with Peterzano (former student of Titian)Wounds a police officer in Milan, leaves for Rome

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Warm-Up 2/09/12Come get your poster.I will record your number and your participationI will display a projected image of the Sistine Chapel map. Your job is to locate what tile you are and sit underneath your tile.

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Caravaggio: Rome (1592-1600)Starts some commissions under Cesari (Clement VIIIs favorite artist) painting flowers and fruit in his workshopBegan several lesser known paintings, including the influential CardsharpsReveals a new narrative and psychological nature to subjects, almost a serendipity of gesture and expression

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The Cardsharpsc. 1596Oil on canvas, 90 x 112 cmKimbell Art Museum, Fort Worth

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Judith Beheading Holofernesc. 1598Oil on canvas, 145 x 195 cmGalleria Nazionale d'Arte Antica, Rome

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Warm-Up 2/10/12What is your favorite work so far from the Baroque period? Defend your preference and provide the proper MARCS.

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Contarelli Chapel1599, under the auspices of Del monte (Italian Cardinal and patron) beings dcor in the church of San LuigiKnown for the new Tenebrism techniques and intense realism of character (both physically and emotionally)Lets describe the MARCS of The Calling of Saint Matthew

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The Calling of Saint Matthew1599-1600Oil on canvas, 322 x 340 cmContarelli Chapel, San Luigi dei Francesi, Rome

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The Baroque in Italy and Spain

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Snapshot Quiz

Snapshot Quiz

CARAVAGGIOTaking of Christc. 1598Oil on canvas, 134 x 170 cmNational Gallery of Ireland, Dublin

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CARAVAGGIOThe Raising of Lazarus1608-09Oil on canvas, 380 x 275 cmMuseo Nazionale, Messina

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Caravaggio (Michelangelo Merisi)David con la testa di Golia1609-1610Olio su tela, cm 125x101Provenienza: collezione del cardinale Scipione Borghese

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Caravaggio.The Conversion of St. Paul.1600-1601. Oil on canvas. Santa Maria del Popolo, Rome, Italy.

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Caravaggio.The Crucifixion of St. Peter.1600-1601. Oil on canvas. Santa Maria del Popolo, Rome, Italy.

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Weekly BreakdownMonday: Gentleschi, Carraci and BerniniTuesday: AP test: Prehistoric-BaroqueWednesday: AP test (Cont.)Thursday: Renaissance vs. Baroque SymposiumEssay prompt (5 paragraphs, due on Symposium): The theme of love is powerful and salient as Christian expression. Fully identify one Renaissance painting and one Baroque painting and describe how the art philosophies concerning God and Man influence the artists view of love.Bring in a food item. Tell us how it relates to Baroque ideals or Renaissance idealsTeam Art Game for extra credit

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Artemisia GentileschiMost accomplished of the second gen. Baroque painters More than 34 masterpiecesFirst woman to join the Accademia di Arte del Disegno in FlorenceMain themes:Strong women of the bibleSuffering Mythic FemalesCharacteristic tenebrismLooks of astonishment, tense surprise, open form

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Gentileschi, Artemisia Self-Portrait as the Allegory of Painting 1638/39 Oil on canvas 38 7/8 x 29 5/8 in (98.6 x 75.2 cm) Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II

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Bible: You Go GURLZ!Bathsheba: Takes a bath on a rooftopright next to Davids palaceConspires to send her husband to war since she is pregnantQueen EstherBecomes wife of Persian kingSaves her exiled people from destructionDeborahJudge in early Hebrew societyOrganizes an army and sucessfully defeats the canaanites

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Roman beginning (1593)Learned painting while visiting her fathers workshopOrazio is friends with CravaggioCompletes first work at age 17Susanna and the Elders depicts the deauterocanonical account of voyeurism, sexual assault and blackmail2 years later, Gentileschi is raped while being tutored by Tazzi during a commission

Gentileschi, Artemisia Susannah and the Elders 1610 Oil on canvas 66 7/8 x 46 7/8 in (170 x 119 cm) Collection Graf von Schoenborn, Pommersfelden

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Gentileschi, Artemisia Judith Beheading Holofernes 1620 Oil on canvas 78 3/8 x 64 in (199 x 162.5 cm) Uffizi, Florence

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Weekly BreakdownMonday: Gentleschi, Carraci and BerniniTuesday: AP test: Prehistoric-BaroqueWednesday: AP test (Cont.)Thursday: Renaissance vs. Baroque SymposiumEssay prompt (5 paragraphs, due on Symposium): The theme of love is powerful and salient as Christian expression. Fully identify one Renaissance painting and one Baroque painting and describe how the art philosophies concerning God and Man influence the artists view of love.Bring in a food item. Tell us how it relates to Baroque ideals or Renaissance idealsTeam Art Game for extra credit

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Annibale Carracci1582, Born in BolognaStudied Florentine linear drafsmanship (Raphael)Combined Raphaels rich colors with the misty edges of the Venetian schoolStyle and CharacteristicsContrast of color, with misty colors, blended neutrals in the foregroundIdealized religious figures, contrasts CaravaggioIt was his work that is praised in the coming decadesMore than Caravagio, who had a devout, yet limited, audience

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The Flight into Egypt1603Oil on canvas, 122 x 230 cmGalleria Doria Pamphilj, Rome

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CARRACCI, AnnibaleDomine quo vadis?1601-02Oil on panel, 77,4 x 56,3 cmNational Gallery, London

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CARRACCI, AnnibaleCeiling fresco1597-1602FrescoPalazzo Farnese, Rome

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Timed WriteThis question asks you to explore the stylistic relationships between the form and content of figurative art.How a culture is perceived is often expressed in depictions of the human figure. Choose two specific representations of the human body from different cultures. Only one of your choices may be from a European artistic tradition. Discuss significant aspects of each culture that are revealed by the way in which the human body is depicted. (30 minutes)

Gian Lorenzo BerniniBorn to a mannerist sculptor (1598-1680)Age of 8, helped his father on several commissions for Pope Paul VReceived his first commission soon after by Cardinal BorgheseWorked for the Cardinal, as well as 4 other popes (except Innocent X)

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Gian Lorenzo BerniniMajor Works:Rape of ProserpinaAeneas, Anchises and AscaniusApollo and DaphneDavidEcstasy of St. TheresaFountains in RomeColonade of St. Peters

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Gian Lorenzo BerniniCharacteristics:Upholds the waning Counter-Reformation tone infused within a Baroque settingNaturalistic realism to both classical sculptural content and religious workUnderscored by a strong sense of narrativeDramatic, often violent tension in face and body representative of Hellenistic sculpture (Dionysian)Infusion of Painterly style to sculpture

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The Rape of Proserpina1621-22Marble. height 295 cmGalleria Borghese, Rome

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The Martyrdom of St Lawrence1614-15Marble, 66 x 108 cmGalleria degli Uffizi, Florence

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Gianlorenzo BerniniDamned Soul1619White Marble38cmSpanish embassy, Palazzo di Spagna, Rome

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Gianlorenzo Bernini, David, 1623.Marble, 5 7 high. GalleriaBorghese, Rome.Berninis sculptures

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Weekly BreakdownChapter 18: The Baroque in Flanders and Holland (Pgs. 586-605)Tuesday: Bernini Sculpture and ArchitectureBaroque ArchitectureRead 586-591, Rubens, Van Dyck, Brueghal, Wednesday:Diego Valasquez (Spanish Baroque)Rubens, Van Dyck, BrueghalRead 592-597: RembrandtWOAH Blog 5: Still LifeThursday:Frans Hals, RembrandtRead 598-605: Still Life and VermeerFriday: Art Activity: Still Life Oil PaintingVermeerCreative Art P