Writing for Publication: Get Started, Get Support, Get Published

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  1. 1. Writing for Publication: Getting Started, Getting Help and Getting Published EAHIL + ICAHIS + ICLC : 10-12 June 2015 : Edinburgh Maria J Grant Research Fellow (Writing for Publication) Editor, Health Information & Libraries Journal (IF: 0.932)
  2. 2. http://wileyonlinelibrary.com/journal/hilj
  3. 3. How many people here write? Peer reviewed article Newsletter item Non-peer reviewed article Project or management report Twitter or Facebook Blog post Book review
  4. 4. Realising we all write and that Writing for Publication is just part of that continuum
  5. 5. Writing for Publication Is Different Expected to support statements with references Contextualise what is known about the subject and any gaps in the evidence How does your writing adds to the body of knowledge Level of rigour when writing for publication is higher http://bit.ly/1He9a2E
  6. 6. Why Might You Want to Write for Publication? Dissemination of research findings Stimulate debate Expectation of peers and employers Prestige Credibility with colleagues Financial incentives http://bit.ly/1lUIkk5
  7. 7. Introduce yourself to the person next to you What is the main thing you do in your everyday practice? What types of things have you written before? What are your areas of interest? What topics would you potentially like to write about in the future? http://bit.ly/1KUGVYX http://bit.ly/NhZRBm
  8. 8. Hello, my name is Maria What is the main thing you do in your everyday working life? What types of things have you written before? I co-ordinate a dissertation module for the MSc Nursing programme Contribute to literature reviews within the school Book reviews Project reports Peer reviewed journal articles Twitter accounts (@MariaJGrant @HILJnl)
  9. 9. Hello, my name is Maria What are your areas of interest? Writing for Publication What topics would you potentially like to write about in the future? - Moving from what we believe works well to gathering confirmatory evidence of what actually works well
  10. 10. Introduce yourself to the person next to you What is the main thing you do in your everyday practice? What types of things have you written before? What are your areas of interest? What topics would you potentially like to write about in the future? http://bit.ly/1KUGVYX http://bit.ly/NhZRBm
  11. 11. Your Working Title Brainstorming a range of draft working titles Think creatively http://phil-race.co.uk/ Shortlist no more than six Rate your titles (Race 1999) http://bit.ly/NhZRBm
  12. 12. Robert Browns 8 Questions (Q1 & Q2) 1. The working title of your paper 2. Authors 3. Anticipated journal/s 4. Intended readers/audiences 5. What is the central question your paper poses? / What is the answer it will provide? 6. If your readers had only one sentence to summarise your article, what should it be? 7. Why did you do the work? What did you do? What happened? What does your study contribute? 8. What remains unresolved? http://bit.ly/NhZRBm http://bit.ly/1EIpxUh
  13. 13. Roberts Questions 3 & 4 (Anticipated journal/s & intended readers/audiences) Health Information and Libraries Journal (HILJ) is an international journal with interdisciplinary interest to practitioners, researchers, and students in the library and health sectors. Its objectives include promoting debate about new health information developments with an emphasis on communicating evidence-based information both in the management and support of healthcare services.http://bit.ly/1DIALH2
  14. 14. Robert Browns Questions 3 & 4 (Anticipated journal/s & intended readers/audiences) Health Information and Libraries Journal (HILJ) is an international journal with interdisciplinary interest to practitioners, researchers, and students in the library and health sectors. Its objectives include promoting debate about new health information developments with an emphasis on communicating evidence-based information both in the management and support of healthcare services.http://bit.ly/1xpMpzg
  15. 15. Author Guidelines (Q4) http://bit.ly/1zZbdTf http://bit.ly/NhZRBm
  16. 16. Look at Past Issues Learn from people whove already been through the process http://bit.ly/qOaJWR
  17. 17. The Health Information and Libraries Journal Wont Be Interested In My Local Project Not just about what you did Setting it in context of whats gone before http://bit.ly/1MxVZd5
  18. 18. Setting the Context Literature review What is known about the subject area? What are the gaps identified in the literature? How does your manuscript address this gap? International context http://bit.ly/nS9QxS
  19. 19. What do we expect when we read an article? Relevant/Useful Present something new Want to use time efficiently Clarity/Well written Knowledgeable author Illustrated by being linked to known work in the area Hoping is done well good science Uses particular technique to demonstrate real world application of techniques study design Follow appropriate conventions (methods in methods section, results in results, discussion, conclusion is merely summing up) so easier to follow Abstract matches article Well edited/typeset http://bit.ly/NhZRBm
  20. 20. Roberts Question(s) 5 What is the central question your paper poses? / What is the answer it will provide? http://bit.ly/1EIpxUh
  21. 21. Your Writing Sandwich Write for 5 minutes about the working title you ranked as the most important Dont self edit Dont re-read If you dont know what to write then write I dont know what to write Keep your pen or pencil flowing http://bit.ly/N4gUGY http://bit.ly/NhZRBm
  22. 22. The Sandwich Filling Take turns to share your writing idea with the person sitting next to you Ask questions to clarify your understanding http://bit.ly/NhZRBm http://bit.ly/N4gUGY
  23. 23. The Last Slice Re-visit your five minutes of writing Rework it in light of the questions your partner asked and the answers you gave http://bit.ly/NhZRBm http://bit.ly/N4gUGY
  24. 24. Reconvene in 30 minutes http://bit.ly/1JBFVsz
  25. 25. Finding Time http://bit.ly/M8BJ1E
  26. 26. Making Time http://bit.ly/M8BJ1E
  27. 27. Consider Learning to talk about writing is an important key to becoming a productive writer. (Belcher, 2009 p2) http://amzn.to/16aNxth
  28. 28. (Experienced) Colleagues Talking Learning Writing Editing and advising (Grant et al 2010)
  29. 29. English as a Second Language Language: The language of publication is English. Authors for whom English is a second language must have their manuscript professionally edited by an English speaking person before submission to make sure the English is of a high quality. It is preferred that manuscripts are professionally edited. A list of independent suppliers of editing services can be found at http://authorservices.wiley.com/bauthor/english_language.asp All services are paid for and arranged by the author, and use of one of these services does not guarantee acceptance or preference for publication. This should conform with the Concise Oxford English Dictionary.
  30. 30. English as a Second Language Language: The language of publication is English. Authors for whom English is a second language must have their manuscript professionally edited by an English speaking person before submission to make sure the English is of a high quality. It is preferred that manuscripts are professionally edited. A list of independent suppliers of editing services can be found at http://authorservices.wiley.com/bauthor/english_language.asp All services are paid for and arranged by the author, and use of one of these services does not guarantee acceptance or preference for publication. This should conform with the Concise Oxford English Dictionary.
  31. 31. Second Languages: Easier to Speak than to Write! Punctuation is used to create sense, clarity and stress in sentences You use punctuation marks to structure and organise your writing
  32. 32. Punctuation perhaps you dont always need to use commas periods colons etc to make sentences clear when i am in a hurry tired cold lazy or angry i sometimes leave out punctuation marks grammar is stupid i can write without it and dont need it my uncle Harry once said he was not very clever and i never understood a word he wrote to me i think ill learn some punctuation not too much enough to write to Uncle Harry he needs some help (edufind.com 2015) http://bit.ly/NhZRBm
  33. 33. Punctuation is used to create sense, clarity and stress in sentences Perhaps you don't always need to use commas, periods, colons etc. to make sentences clear. When I am in a hurry, tired, cold, lazy, or angry I sometimes leave out punctuation marks. "Grammar is stupid! I can write without it and don't need it," my uncle Harry once said. He was not very clever, and I never understood a word he wrote to me. I think I'll learn some punctuation - not too much, enough to write to Uncle Harry. He needs some help! (edufind.com 2015)
  34. 34. patter @ http://patthomson.net/
  35. 35. Weekly Writing Tips @MariaJGrant
  36. 36. Research, Evaluation & Audit Key Steps in Demonstrating Your Value Chapter 11: Writing for Publication Co-written with Graham Walton, Editor, New Review of Academic Librarianship (Grant et al 2013) http://bit.ly/MXt6LT
  37. 37. Timelapse Writing a Research Paper http://bit.ly/1I93OYm
  38. 38. Edit, Edit, Edit Revisit every section of your paper including the title, abstract and authorship
  39. 39. Authorship/Attribution Can Be Contentious (Q2) Discuss authorship as early as possible, ideally before you start to write Make, distribute & keep copies of authorship agreement What is to be written up Who is to write up which elements The order of authors on the final document All authors to agree the final draft prior to submission and approve any amendments http://bit.ly/1yqTXlU
  40. 40. Submitting Your Manuscript!
  41. 41. What is Peer Review? Peer review is the process by which reports of, or proposals for, research are scrutinised by other researchers. (Committee of Publisher Ethics 2011)
  42. 42. What is the purpose of peer review? To ensure that only the best quality manuscripts are published To provide constructive feedback on how a manuscript can be further developed http://bit.ly/1JHacVg
  43. 43. What are the Potential Outcomes of a Peer Review? Five potential outcomes Accept Minor revisions Major revisions/Rewrite & resubmit Un-submitted Reject http://bit.ly/1QIhTe5
  44. 44. Outcome 1: Accepted A cause for celebration! Ive only known a peer reviewed manuscript be accepted at first submission once Usually a journey http://bit.ly/o80w2e
  45. 45. Outcome 2: Minor Revisions A recommendation of minor revision should be made if the manuscript is likely to be of interest to the HILJ readership but typographical errors or incomplete references are present. (S1M 2011) http://bit.ly/n3Uowg
  46. 46. Outcome 3: Major Revisions/ Rewrite & Resubmit A recommendation of a major revision should be made if the manuscript is likely to be of interest to the HILJ readership but requires a reworking in terms of structure or the inclusion of additional materials. (S1M 2011)
  47. 47. Outcome 4: Un-submitted Likely to be of interest to the Health Information and Libraries Journal but requires further development before it is ready to send for peer review http://bit.ly/1JBUXOP
  48. 48. Outcome 5: Rejected A recommendation to reject a manuscript should be made if the manuscript is unlikely to be relevant/of interest to the HILJ readership or is not sufficiently rigorous to be suitable for publication in an academic journal. (S1M 2011) http://bit.ly/pT2Ess
  49. 49. Reasons a Manuscript Might Be Rejected Out of scope Topic area or format Insufficiently developed Bullet points Plagiarism Not responding to referee/s comments http://bit.ly/pT2Ess
  50. 50. What To Do When You Receive Referee/s Comments? Take a deep breath Read the comments Put the manuscript aside Discuss them with your co- author/s Respond positively to each point raised http://bit.ly/LBT2Ja Remember, very few manuscripts are accepted without any revisions
  51. 51. Your Manuscript Has Been Accepted! http://bit.ly/1eZIvvw http://bit.ly/1FGhB2c
  52. 52. Youll Be Sent a Proof
  53. 53. Published on Early View
  54. 54. If you had only one sentence (Q6) http://bit.ly/1vjtStO http://bit.ly/NhZRBm
  55. 55. Roberts Eighth Question (Q8) What remains unresolved? http://bit.ly/1CjowP0
  56. 56. Is the Health Information and Libraries Journal interested in your local project? http://bit.ly/1dmoqhX
  57. 57. References Belcher, W. L. (2009) Writing your journal article in 12 weeks: a guide to academic publishing success. London: Sage. Grant, M. J., Sen, B. and Spring, H. (2013) research, evaluation & audit key steps in demonstrating your value. London: Facet Publishing. Grant, M. J., Munro, W., McIsaac, J. and Hill, S. (2010) Cross-disciplinary writers group stimulates fresh approaches to scholarly communication: a reflective case study within a higher education institution in the north west of England, New Review of Academic Librarianship, 16: 1, 44-64. Mewburn, I. (2014) The thesis whisperer. http://thesiswhisperer.com/ edufind.com (2015) English grammer guide. Web site: http://www.edufind.com/english-grammar/english-grammar-guide/ Race, P. (1999) 2000 tips for lecturers. London: Routledge. Thompson, P. (2015) Patter. Web site: http://patthomson.net/ Weninger, T. Timelapse writing of a research paper. Web site: http://bit.ly/1I93OYm Wiley (2015) ScholarOne Manuscripts. Web site: https://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/hilj http://bit.ly/1ybnaaq
  58. 58. Maria J Grant Email: m.j.grant@salford.ac.uk Twitter: @MariaJGrant Facebook: http://on.fb.me.ovBuiM Health Information and Libraires Journal: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/jour nal/10.1111/%28ISSN%291471- 1842