45774778 violin-scale-charts

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  • Violin Scale Charts for students, parents, adults Major Scales Minor Scales Major Arpeggios Minor Arpeggios Violin Scale Charts, Sarkett Productions, 1992, All Rights Reserved, $15.00
  • Before you begin, a few words of explanation . . . While every effort has been made to make this graphic reference work authoritative, it must be noted that there is no single, one and only, and exclusively "correct" way to finger a scale. Different scale passages in different repertory may call for different approaches. Different scales may be, and in fact, must be, played in different positions, different finger patterns from time to time. On an even more individual level, one player's high "3" may be another player's low "4." G major is a good example. Some violinists ascend on open strings D, A and E, and descend using "4" for those notes. This is the most common teaching. Nevertheless, other players go up and down with "4." Still others go up and down with open strings. You see what we mean, of course . . . These elementary level Violin Scale Charts open the door to various positions and finger patterns. By all means, experiment. Should your teacher differ with anything presented here, please follow his/her approach. What's the position of your editors, you say? As you play through the book, you'll notice your editor has stressed the use of "4" versus open strings in order to develop your facility and confidence in this often called for, and sometimes insecure finger. Indeed, one of the greatest benefits of using Violin Scale Charts, especially at the elementary level, will be to build a strong and secure "4" finger, a more beautiful tone, and stronger and more confident expression. After all, as a musician who happens to play the violin, expression is what you are all about anyway, isn't it? Have fun with these charts. They will make you a more expressive, more confident musician. Sincerely, John A. Sarkett, jas@interaccess.com, http://homepage.interaccess.com/~jas/violin_scale_charts.html Editorial Review Committee (in alphabetical order) Dr. Milton Goldberg, Distinguished Suzuki Educator, Winnetka, IL, USA Violin: D.M.A., M.M., B.M., Northwestern U., student of Henry Sopkin, Angel Reyes and Samuel Thaviu; member, board of directors and formerly treasurer, Suzuki Association of the Americas; violin editor, S. A. A. Journal; faculty member, American Suzuki Institute at Stevens Point (holder of Suzuki Chair, 1979); Winnetka "Educator of the Year" 1980; coordinator of instrumental instruction (1945-1978) in Winnetka public schools where he pioneered the introduction of the Suzuki method (1964); former concertmaster, Highland Park (IL) Strings; registered teachertrainer, Suzuki Violin Pedagogy. Faculty member of the Music Center of the North Shore. Christopher Hoff, Violinist and Attorney-at-Law, Germantown, MD Student of Russian violin pedagogue and JCC Symphony Concertmaster Yakov Shapiro. Kathleen Paramore, Washburne Junior High School, Winnetka, IL, USA Violin: B.M., Northwestern U., student of Betty Haag, John Kendall and Stan Nosal; member of SAA, MENC, IGSMA; director of strings, Winnetka Public Schools; former instructor for the Waukegan, IL Public Schools; former instructor for the Lake Forest (IL) Symphony Music Institute; former instructor at Haag/Leviton Academy for the Performing Arts. Klaus Pfefferkorn, Conductor, Bludenz Youth Orchestra, Bludenz, Austria Violin teaching diploma at the Academia "Mozarteum" in Salzburg, Austria by Professor B. Steinschaden. Member of the Sinfonic Orchestra of Vorarlberg. Mr. Pfefferkorn teaches violin and orchestra in Bludenz/Austria and Vaduz/Liechtenstein. Violin Scale Charts Page 2
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  • A Visual Learning Supplement: Violin Scale Charts by John A. Sarkett Eyes are vocal, tears have tongues, And there are words not made with lungs. Crashaw versus open strings in order to develop your facility and confidence in this often called for, and sometimes insecure finger. Indeed, one of the greatest benefits of using Violin Scale Charts, especially at the elementary level, will be to build a strong and secure "4" finger, a more beautiful tone, and stronger and more confident expression. After all, as a musician who happens to play the violin, expression is what you are all about anyway, isn't it? Have fun with these charts. They will make you a more expressive, more confident musician. My initial effort was edited by teachers at the Music Center of the North Shore, and Washburne Middle School, both of Winnetka, Illinois, including Enid Cleary, Milton Goldberg and Kathleen Paramore. The gaps are the thing. The gaps are the spirits one home, the altitudes and latitudes so dazzlingly spare and clean that the spirit can discover itself like a once-blind man unbound. The gaps are the clefts in the rock where you cower to see the back parts of God; they are the fissures between mountains and cells the wind lances through, the icy narrowing fiords splitting the cliffs of mystery. Go up into the gaps. If you can find them; they shift and vanish too. Stalk the gaps. Squeak into a gap in the soil, turn, and unlock -- more than a maple -- a universe. Annie Dillard In the beginners mind there are many possibilities, but in the experts mind there are few. Shunryu Suzuki Think of Beethoven. Do you hear G - G - G- Eb-------? Or do you see that face: eyes piercing, hair tousled, mouth scowling? Either way, you activate your right brain. Its this side of your brain that had historically been overlooked in the traditional academic presentation of lectures and reading, employing left brain and linear thinking, but today many modern educators realize just how productive right-brain, visual, holistic learning can be. They take steps to incorporate it into the learning experience. As Linda Verlee Williams notes in her book Teaching for the Two-Sided Mind, Visual thinking [should not be only] associated with the visual arts and relegated to a single area in the curriculum; it [should be considered] a part of every subject because it is a basic way of obtaining, processing, and representing information. To ignore its role in any subject is to fail to train students in its use and to deny to those who are primarily visual processors the opportunity to learn in the mode which comes most easily for them. Any subject can even include the sound and serial note world of music, I learned as a Suzuki parent. Supplementary scales Expanding on our regular Suzuki regimen, our teacher, Susan Rozendaal, assigned scales to my daughter, Sharika, then 9. To aid her learning, I devised a simple, visual chart of the notes, much like a chord chart common in the guitar world. I used the Hypercard program for the Macintosh - a graphics and text processing program. Each week she would be assigned a new scale, and each week I would draw up one new chart. I titled these, simply enough, Violin Scale Charts. So, instead of presenting the information serially, (left brain), as traditional notes on a scale, or aurally, on tape, as pure sound to imitate, Violin Scale Charts presents the scale and arpeggio information as a simple (right brain) picture, a map of where to put your fingers. Sharika used these charts regularly. Her tone, confidence and specifically, 4 finger were noticeably enhanced. When our Suzuki teacher happened upon my