Snakes Lapbook Preview

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  • Snakes Lapbook

  • Vocabulary Words and Definitions

    Lapbook Component- Vocabulary Fan

    Prey- an animal that is food for another animal.

    Python- a very big snake that squeezes its prey.

    Venom- a liquid from an animal that causes sickness or death.

    Basking- when a snake lies in the sun to warm up its cold blood so it can move around quickly.

    Constriction- when a snake coils its body around an animal and squeezes it to stop its breathing.

    Molt- when a snake sheds its skin.

    Scales- small, hard plates that cover a snakes whole body.

    Reptiles- the group of scaly, cold blooded animals that includes snakes, crocodiles and tortoises.

    Fangs- a pair of sharp teeth used to inject venom.

    Egg Tooth- small tooth used by baby snakes to break through the shell of its egg. It disappears shortly after birth.

    Jacobsons Organ- an organ found on the roof of the snakes mouth that helps it sense smells.

  • Vocabu

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  • PRINT ON CARDSTOCK.

    Cut shapes apart. Write one vocabulary word and definition on each shape. Stack together with cover on top and secure with a brad.

  • What Is A Snake?

    Lapbook Component- What is a Snake?

    Snakes are cold blooded. This means their body temperatures are determined by outside sources, such as the heat of the sun, and is regulated only by basking or seeking shade. Most snakes, ideal temperature is 85 degrees. At low temperatures, snakes are sluggish, and body functions are slow. To digest meals, they need high body temperatures.

    Size and Shape All snakes have the same form, long and thin with no limbs. Yet vary from size from different species. The smallest, barely longer than the human finger, to the largest can extend six times the weight of a person.

    Snakes can crawl, swim and climb to hunt. They have lots of bones so their bodies bend easily. They have strong muscles to move their bones. This allows snakes to loop side to side or push and pull themselves forward.

    Snake Anatomy

    Lapbook Component: Scales Flap

    Scales Snakes bodies are covered with scales. They are thick fingernail like material on stretchy skin. Scales keep snakes from being hurt as they crawl over sharp rocks, through thorny brush, and up rough tree bark.

    Snakes have 4 types of scales on different parts of their body.

    Dorsal Scales- Scales on their back are small and overlap like roof shingles. These act like armor to shield the snake. These scales are colored

    Ventral Scales- Scales on the belly are big and flat. These act like tire tread to dig in and pull the snake along.

    Head Scales- They are large and plate like in many species.

    Subcaudal Scales- Found beneath the snakes tail, similar to ventral scales.

  • Snakes have one big, clear scale over each eye. They cover the eye like goggles.

    Scales help protect snakes against biting insects, small predators, parasites, and snakes own prey.

  • Fold in half on solid line. Cur on the dotted line. Inside the book, write snake characteristics.

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  • Skull Unlike most carnivores, which can chew their prey, tear it apart, or hold it while they feed, snakes have no limbs and so have to swallow their food whole. The skulls are constructed so that the upper and lower jawbones can move backward, forward, and outward independently of each other or the rest of the skull. This flexibility provided by the lower jawbones, which are not joined at the chin, but can stretch apart or be thrust forward one side at a time. This enables the snake to hook its teeth into the prey and drag it into its mouth.

    TeethTeeth are arranged along the lower jaws, the outer set of upper jaws and an inner set of upper jawbones. The teeth are not rooted in a socket but are loosely attached to the surface of the jawbone on its inner edge. They easily get dislodged but are being replaced by new ones.

    Lapbook Components: Skull & Teeth Matchbooks

    FangsSome snakes have enlarged fangs for injecting venom. These snakes are divided into two groups.

    Rear Fanged Snakes- They have a single pair of fangs toward the backs of their mouths. Very few of these are harmful to humans.

    Front Fanged Snakes- Snakes with front fangs belong to the cobra, and viper families. They have the ability to fold their fangs against the roof of the mouth when not in use. They are hollow so that the venom can flow easily and penetrate deep into the prey.

    Lapbook Component- Fangs Triangle

    SensesSnakes do not have keen eyesight. A snake uses its tongue to help find prey. Flicking out its tongue, it picks up tiny bits of scent matter in the air. When it pulls its tongue back into its mouth, the snake smells if prey is nearby. The forked shape lets the snake judge whether the scent is stronger on the right or left. This helps the snake find his prey day or night.

    Snakes have no external ears. They have a system of small bones in the skull that allows the snake to hear vibrations that are picked up by the lower jawbone. To detect this, the lower jaw must be in contact with the ground.

    Certain snakes have unique sense organs called heat pits. Pythons, boas and pit vipers are some that have these organs.

    Lapbook Component: Senses Layer

  • The eyes of snakes have one of three pupil shapes: round, vertical, or horizontal.

    Round pupils- Most species have round pupils. They tend to be secretive and are nocturnal hunters.

    Vertical pupils- typically nocturnal species, such as vipers. Theyve adapted to poor light conditions. In bright light, their pupils contract to slits to protect their retinas.

    Horizontal pupils- this occurs in very few species of snakes. These snakes have good binocular vision. This allows them to judge distances very accurately.

    Lapbook Component: Eyes Tab

    Losing Their Skin Snakes grow new skin when their old skin gets too small. The snake rubs on a rock to make a tiny crack in its skin. The crack gets bigger and bigger. As the snake crawls, the old skin comes off in one piece.

    Lapbook Component- Shedding Skin Wheel

  • Cut each book out as one piece. Fold matchbook style.

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  • paste back to lapbook

    Cut out as one piece. Fold flap 1 in. Fold cover piece Fangs down.

    Open cover. Write about fangs on the first page. Open to reveal two more spaces. Write about rear fanged snakes on one piece and front fanged snakes on the other.

  • How do snakes find prey? How do snakes hear?

    What are heat pits?

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    Snake Senses

  • Horizontal

    Vertical

    Round

    Snake Eyes

  • remove this area

    Print on cardstock. Cut out circles. Attach two circles together with a brad. Let your student write the three steps of snake shedding on the wheel (one per section then turn)

  • Where Do Snakes Live? Snakes like to hide. Some crawl into deep holes or climb trees. Others live in oceans or lakes. All snakes like warm places best. If a snake gets cold, it cannot move.

    Lapbook Component- World Snake Map

    Location of Snakes & Adult Sizes

    Mexico Cantil ( 3ft)

    US Blind Snake (8in) Copperhead (3ft) Dusky Pygmy Rattlesnake (22in) Eastern Diamondback Rattlesnake (8ft) Garter Snake (30in) Timber Rattlesnake (3 ft) Western Diamondback Rattlesnake (7ft)

    Brazil Anaconda (18ft)

    Namibia Horned Desert Viper (29in)

    Tanzania Blanding Tree Snake (7ft) Egg Eating Snake (30in) Gaboon Viper (7ft) Green Bush Viper (24in)

    Thailand King Cobra (18ft) Reticulated Python (33ft)

    Kenya African Rock Python (20ft)

  • Tanzania

    Kenya

    Thailand

  • Namibia

    Mexico

    United States

    Brazil

    Cut out pages. Write names of snakes who live in each place (you may not be able to fit all of them). Add sizes, if de-sired. Stack together with cover on top and staple as indicated.

  • Movement

    Lapbook Component- Movement Tab

    Snakes have 4 types of motion, which vary according to the kind of terrain they live in.

    Linear Progression- Waves of muscles contract along the length of its body to move the snake directly forward. The trailing edges of its large ventral scales provide grip.

    Lateral Undulation- This is the most common type of motion. The snake moves forward by pushing the sides of its body against rocks or other ground irregularities.

    Concertina Movement- In a tight space, snakes proceed by bunching its muscles in turn, firs