Presentation by Paul Roberts O.B.E

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Presentation looking at the economic and social value of entrepreneurial and cultural learning.

Text of Presentation by Paul Roberts O.B.E

  • 1. Design VenturaMarch18, 2013The value ofentrepreneurial, culturaland creative learningPaul Robertswww.cceengland.co.uk
  • 2. We know what we need"There are powerful reasons to believe that what worked spectacularly between 1960 and 2010 will not work between 2010 and 2060. "It will depend on individuals who are open to ideas and arguments and who are part of teams in which vigorous debate, dissent and discomfort exist. It will require a culture of openness - to argument and to ideas, experts and outsiders, the young and the new." Oceans of Innovation: The Atlantic, the Pacific, global leadership and the future of education (Barber, Donnelly and Rozvi 2012)
  • 3. Is this what weve got (1) ?(1) The Test-Score/Interest Paradox
  • 4. Is this what weve got (2)?
  • 5. Building the CreativeGeneration (1)1. Inquisitive Wondering and Questioning Exploring and Investigating Challenging assumptions2. Persistent Managing uncertainty Sticking with difficulty Daring to be different3. Imaginative Playing with possibilities Making Connections Using intuition
  • 6. Building the CreativeGeneration (2)4. Disciplined Crafting and Improving Developing techniques Reflecting critically5. Collaborative Cooperating appropriately Giving and receiving feedback Sharing the product
  • 7. What type of school does it need (1) High System Schools with Schools with high high test scores test scores and but low pupil independent independence motivated pupils and motivationLow HighFunctioning Functioning Schools with creative Low performing activities which are schools enjoyable but do not impact pupil learning Low System
  • 8. What type of school does it need (2)Guided Role of the teacher ChallengingContrived Nature of activities AuthenticBellbound Organisation of time FlexibleClassroom Organisation of space WorkshopIndividual Approach to tasks GroupHidden Visibility of processes HighStatic Location of activities MobileIgnored Self as learning resource CentralSome Inclusiveness AllDirected Role of learner Self managing
  • 9. Why does Cultural Education matter and the argument for Design?The Intrinsic: Culture enriches livesThe Extrinsic: Culture changes lives (1) Self-confidence and personal identity Creativity and problem solving Self-discipline and team work Communication Challenge to adult under-expectation Combatting disaffection and underachievement
  • 10. Why does Cultural Education matter and the argument for Design..?The Extrinsic: Culture changes live (2) Personalised learning and commitment Talent and career pathways Culture providing livelihoods Mass participation ( not just observation) Community cohesion
  • 11. What are the characteristics of acultural offer? (1) Learning in and about culture - critical spectators, participants and creators in the cultural world around them Learning through culture - engagement with culture to boost creativity, attainment and personal development
  • 12. What are the characteristics of a culturaloffer? (2) Breadth We want children to experience all cultural forms not what just happens to be on offer in their area Reach We want this range of experience for all children not a fortunate few Quality and sustainability We want ongoing high quality experiences not one off projects Pathways We want all young people to be able to take their interests and passions and talents to the next level and if appropriate into their career choices
  • 13. Professionalising art-talent Semi-professional Route for the practice of artwidth Birth of art-talent
  • 14. Ipsos Mori research on youngpeoples engagement in thearts The main predictors of young peoples engagement in cultural activity at primary school age are the educational qualifications of their parents. The children of parents with no educational qualifications are least likely to participate. There are 482,000 primary age children in the UK in this category.
  • 15. Many primary-aged childrenspend no time on culturalactivities 70% of children of parents with no educational qualifications spend less than three hours per week on cultural activities. 42% spend none. 80% of children whose parents have degrees spend more than 3 hours per week on cultural activities. 27% spend more than 10 hours.
  • 16. The Design VenturaChallenge (1) - Establish the moral and educational imperative - Dont polarise the debate - wholeness - Pursue a creative pedagogy - Unlock demand before increasing supply - Invest in Research - Sweat the evidence - .
  • 17. Invest in Research ProvidedBetween Sweat the evidence (1) training for2008 60,000 -11 teachers Engaging 750,000 young people Working intensively with 133 3900 schools Local Authorities
  • 18. Invest in researchSweat the evidence (2) academic achievement confidence, communication, motivation, expectations creative practitioners, teacher skills, diversity home-school communication pupil attendance greatest impact in places of greatest deprivation wellbeing the how and the whywww.creativitycultureeducation.org/research-reports
  • 19. Family FacesWhere did your ideas come from?From my dreamsHow pleased are you with yoursculpture?Very pleased. Next time I think Ill doeven better because I learned somuch the first time. I achievedsomething I never thought Id beable to do.www.creative-partnerships.comwww.creatvitycultureeducation.org
  • 20. The Design VenturaChallenge (2) - Establish the moral and educational imperative - Dont polarise the debate - wholeness - Pursue a creative pedagogy - Unlock deman