Click here to load reader

C&G PowerPoint Ironmongery

  • View
    643

  • Download
    0

Embed Size (px)

Text of C&G PowerPoint Ironmongery

Slide 1Unit 307: Carry out second fixing double doors and mouldings
Level 3 Diploma in Site carpentry
© 2013 City and Guilds of London Institute. All rights reserved.
‹#› of 18
The choice in design and size of door ironmongery will depend on several factors:
The type of door.
The material the door and frame is constructed from.
The design limitations of the ironmongery.
The rigors of use.
Weight of the doors.
© 2013 City and Guilds of London Institute. All rights reserved.
‹#› of 18
The major deciding factors in the correct selection of ironmongery:
The ironmongery must always:
Allow the doors to deal with the rigors of use.
Ensure the door’s strength is not compromised.
Allow for safe access and egress.
The ironmongery must never:
Compromise the function of the door to the extent of restricting the intended use of the door set.
Level 3 Diploma in Site carpentry
© 2013 City and Guilds of London Institute. All rights reserved.
‹#› of 18
Selecting ironmongery
There is a considerable selection of ironmongery available to choose from.
The choice may have already been taken for you when you come to fit double doors.
Referring to the specification will normally tell you what is to be used and where.
On smaller type jobs the selection could be down to you or you may be asked for a recommendation for a particular type of door set.
Understanding the functions, limitations and working functions is a vital part of fitting double door sets.
Level 3 Diploma in Site carpentry
© 2013 City and Guilds of London Institute. All rights reserved.
‹#› of 18
Allowing the door to open and close.
Locking the door.
Controlling the door.
© 2013 City and Guilds of London Institute. All rights reserved.
‹#› of 18
The two most common forms:
Hinges.
Sliding gear.
Some types of door sets will include a combination of both.
Level 3 Diploma in Site carpentry
© 2013 City and Guilds of London Institute. All rights reserved.
‹#› of 18
The most common materials used for butt hinges are:
Mild steel
chrome plating
electro-brass plating
zinc plating.
Cast iron
Stainless steel
Resists staining and corrosion and is therefore used for hardwood doors and external uses.
Level 3 Diploma in Site carpentry
© 2013 City and Guilds of London Institute. All rights reserved.
‹#› of 18
Brass
Suitable for both internal and external use.
Good for use with oak.
Brass screws:
are soft and can be easily broken while screwing into hard materials – use extreme care.
pre-drill holes for brass screws and add a little petroleum jelly to the thread of the screw to ease the screw into the material and reduce the risk of snapping the screw.
if fitting slotted screws always finish with the slot running vertical.
Level 3 Diploma in Site carpentry
© 2013 City and Guilds of London Institute. All rights reserved.
‹#› of 18
Butt
Loose pin hinge
Enables easy removal of the door by knocking the pin from the hinge.
Must not be used on external open out doors for security reasons.
Ball bearing hinge
Used on heavy doors to ease use and reduce wear and noise.
Rising butts
Supplied as left and right hand sets.
(images courtesy of Ironmongery Direct)
Level 3 Diploma in Site carpentry
© 2013 City and Guilds of London Institute. All rights reserved.
‹#› of 18
Strap and hook and band
Surface mounted on framed, ledged and braced type doors.
Larger sets used to carry heavy doors.
Tee hinge
Similar uses to the strap and hook and band but on lighter doors and gates.
Spring hinge
Designed to make the door self closing.
(images courtesy of Ironmongery Direct)
Level 3 Diploma in Site carpentry
© 2013 City and Guilds of London Institute. All rights reserved.
‹#› of 18
Sliding doors
The most common form for lightweight doors involves the use of a track and roller system fixed above the top of the door.
The rollers are fixed to the top of the door allowing it to run smoothly along the track with a guide fixed to the floor.
Heavy doors use sliding gear fixed to the floor.
(image courtesy of Ironmongery Direct)
Level 3 Diploma in Site carpentry
© 2013 City and Guilds of London Institute. All rights reserved.
‹#› of 18
Available in a very large range of designs and materials.
Can incorporate the key hole.
Used internally and externally.
Can also incorporate the euro lock system making changing the lock a very simple and quick task.
Thumb latch
Typically used on gates and framed, ledged and braced doors.
Hasp and staple
(images courtesy of Ironmongery Direct)
Level 3 Diploma in Site carpentry
© 2013 City and Guilds of London Institute. All rights reserved.
‹#› of 18
Escutcheon
Provides a neat finish to the hole cut for the key.
Flush bolts
Used on the inside edge of double doors, keeping one door locked while the other is in use.
While both doors are shut the bolt is concealed.
Cranked tower bolt
Used as extra security on gates and doors cranked offset allowing bolt to secure into frame work.
(images courtesy of Ironmongery Direct)
Level 3 Diploma in Site carpentry
© 2013 City and Guilds of London Institute. All rights reserved.
‹#› of 18
Rebated mortice locks
Used in double doors that have rebated door stiles and use lever furniture.
A conversion kit in combination with the standard mortice lock is used to create the locking mechanism for the doors.
Cylinder rim latch
Usually used on entrance doors to domestic properties but have poor security features on their own.
Mortice dead lock
Usually used as an additional method of securing the door, typically in combination with the cylinder rim latch.
(images courtesy of Ironmongery Direct and UNION part of ASSA ABLOY Security Solutions)
Level 3 Diploma in Site carpentry
© 2013 City and Guilds of London Institute. All rights reserved.
‹#› of 18
Seals off the door and frame during a fire.
Expands when exposed to heat, sealing around the door preventing smoke from passing through.
Panic bolt and latch
Used on double doors that are to be used as a means of emergency escape, typically fire doors in offices or public areas.
Keeps the doors secure but allows for easy no key escape.
(images courtesy of Ironmongery Direct and Briton)
Level 3 Diploma in Site carpentry
© 2013 City and Guilds of London Institute. All rights reserved.
‹#› of 18
Door closers
Used mainly in industrial buildings, shops and offices to self-close the door.
Particularly important when fitting fire doors.
Linked direct into the fire alarm system which releases the door allowing the closure to close the door.
(images courtesy of Ironmongery Direct and Briton)
Level 3 Diploma in Site carpentry
© 2013 City and Guilds of London Institute. All rights reserved.
‹#› of 18
Door closers
Concealed spring
The cylinder containing the spring is morticed into the stile while the anchor plate is fixed to the door frame.
Pivoted floor spring
Mainly used in shops and offices.
(images courtesy of Ironmongery Direct)
Level 3 Diploma in Site carpentry
© 2013 City and Guilds of London Institute. All rights reserved.
‹#› of 18
Any questions?
© 2013 City and Guilds of London Institute. All rights reserved.
‹#› of 18