Amar 38 final

  • View
    1.917

  • Download
    0

Embed Size (px)

Text of Amar 38 final

UNIVERSITY OF MUMBAIPROJECT ONAN ANYLTICAL STUDY OF INSURANCE COMPANYW.R.T. TATA AIGSUBMITTED BYAMARKUMAR SYRYAWANSHIROLL NO.: 38ADVANCED ACCOUNTANCY PART 1ADVANVCED FINANCIAL ACCOUNTINGIN PARTIAL FULLFILLMENT OF THE DEGREE OFMASTER OF COMMERCE2015-16UNDER THE GUIDENCE OFPROF. NEELAM SHAIKHVIDYA PRASARAK MANDAL, THANEK.G.JOSHI COLLEGE OF ARTS &N.G. BEDEKAR COLLEGE OF COMMERECECHENDANI BUNDER ROAD, THANE-400601

Declaration I, student of M.Com. (Part - I) Roll No. : 38 hereby declare that the project title AN ANLYTICAL STUDY OF INSURANCE COMPANY W.R.T. TATA AIG for the subject ADVANCED FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING submitted by me for semester - II of the academic year 2015-16, is based on actual work carried out by me under the guidance and supervision of PROF. NEELAM SHAIKH. I further state that this work is original and not submitted anywhere else for any examination.

PLACE AMARKUMAR SURYAWANSHIROLL NO: 38DATE

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTIt is indeed a great pleasure and proud privilege to present this project work.

I take this opportunity to express my gratitude and acknowledge to all the individuals involved both directly and indirectly for their valuable help and guidance.

This project has been an attempt to give information about the AN ANALYTICAL STUDY OF INSURANCE COMPANY W.R.T. TATA AIG .I expressed my deep since of gratitude to founder and president of Vidya Prasarak Mandal. I express my heartful thanks to our honorable Principal for her constant support and motivation.

I express special thanks to my guide Prof. NEELAM SHAIKH under whose guidence the project conceived , planned and executed.

I would also like to thank the college library and its staff for patiently listening and guiding me. I would like to thank my family also.

Thank You.

Index Chapter noSubchapterParticularsPage no

11.1Introduction5

1.2Insurability7

1.3Legal9

1.4Indemnification10

1.5Methods of insurance12

1.6Types of insurance13

1.7Review of insurance business in India18

1.8Policies and measures to develop insurance market19

22.1IRDA ACT 199920

2.2Protection of interest of policy holders 22

2.3Literature review23

2.4Research Methodology25

33.1Company profile26

3.2Financial statements31

44.1Conclusion33

4.2Bibliography 34

Chapter 11.1 IntroductionMethods for transferring or distributing risk were practiced by Chinese and Babylonian traders as long ago as the 3rd and 2nd millennia BC, respectively.[1] Chinese merchants travelling treacherous river rapids would redistribute their wares across many vessels to limit the loss due to any single vessel's capsizing. The Babylonians developed a system which was recorded in the famous Code of Hammurabi, c. 1750 BC, and practiced by early Mediterranean sailing merchants. If a merchant received a loan to fund his shipment, he would pay the lender an additional sum in exchange for the lender's guarantee to cancel the loan should the shipment be stolen or lost at sea.At some point in the 1st millennium BC, the inhabitants of Rhodes created the 'general average'. This allowed groups of merchants to pay to insure their goods being shipped together. The collected premiums would be used to reimburse any merchant whose goods were jettisoned during transport, whether to storm or sinkage. Separate insurance contracts (i.e., insurance policies not bundled with loans or other kinds of contracts) were invented in Genoa in the 14th century, as were insurance pools backed by pledges of landed estates. The first known insurance contract dates from Genoa in 1347, and in the next century maritime insurance developed widely and premiums were intuitively varied with risks.[3] These new insurance contracts allowed insurance to be separated from investment, a separation of roles that first proved useful in marine insurance.Insurance is the equitable transfer of the risk of a loss, from one entity to another in exchange for money. It is a form of risk management primarily used to hedge against the risk of a contingent, uncertain loss. An insurer, or insurance carrier, is selling the insurance; the insured, or policyholder, is the person or entity buying the insurance policy. The amount of money to be charged for a certain amount of insurance coverage is called the premium. Risk management, the practice of appraising and controlling risk, has evolved as a discrete field of study and practice. The transaction involves the insured assuming a guaranteed and known relatively small loss in the form of payment to the insurer in exchange for the insurer's promise to compensate (indemnity) the insured in the case of a financial (personal) loss. The insured receives a contract, called the insurance policy, which details the conditions and circumstances under which the insured will be financially compensated Since the mankind, every individual were ready for some type of sacrifice to avoid the evil consequences of flood and fire. The same instinct is now in todays businessmen to secure themselves against loss and disaster. This instinct was the main reason for the birth of Insurance. Beginning date of Insurance is almost 6000 years back but it largely developed in the past few centuries, particularly after the industrial era. In India, insurance has a deep-rooted history. It finds mention in the writings of Manu ( Manusmrithi ), Yagnavalkya ( Dharmasastra ) and Kautilya ( Arthasastra ). The writings talk in terms of pooling of resources that could be re-distributed in times of calamities such as fire, floods, epidemics and famine. This was probably a pre-cursor to modern day insurance. Ancient Indian history has preserved the earliest traces of insurance in the form of marine trade loans and carriers contracts. Insurance in India has evolved over time heavily drawing from other countries, England in particular.

1.2 InsurabilityRisk which can be insured by private companies typically shares seven common characteristics:1. Large number of similar exposure units: Since insurance operates through pooling resources, the majority of insurance policies are provided for individual members of large classes, allowing insurers to benefit from the law of large numbers in which predicted losses are similar to the actual losses. Exceptions include Lloyd's of London, which is famous for insuring the life or health of actors, sports figures, and other famous individuals. However, all exposures will have particular differences, which may lead to different premium rates.2. Definite loss: The loss takes place at a known time, in a known place, and from a known cause. The classic example is death of an insured person on a life insurance policy. Fire, automobile accidents, and worker injuries may all easily meet this criterion. Other types of losses may only be definite in theory. Occupational disease, for instance, may involve prolonged exposure to injurious conditions where no specific time, place, or cause is identifiable. Ideally, the time, place, and cause of a loss should be clear enough that a reasonable person, with sufficient information, could objectively verify all three elements.3. Accidental loss: The event that constitutes the trigger of a claim should be fortuitous, or at least outside the control of the beneficiary of the insurance. The loss should be pure, in the sense that it results from an event for which there is only the opportunity for cost. Events that contain speculative elements such as ordinary business risks or even purchasing a lottery ticket are generally not considered insurable.4. Large loss: The size of the loss must be meaningful from the perspective of the insured. Insurance premiums need to cover both the expected cost of losses, plus the cost of issuing and administering the policy, adjusting losses, and supplying the capital needed to reasonably assure that the insurer will be able to pay claims. For small losses, these latter costs may be several times the size of the expected cost of losses. There is hardly any point in paying such costs unless the protection offered has real value to a buyer.5. Affordable premium: If the likelihood of an insured event is so high, or the cost of the event so large, that the resulting premium is large relative to the amount of protection offered, then it is not likely that the insurance will be purchased, even if on offer. Furthermore, as the accounting profession formally recognizes in financial accounting standards, the premium cannot be so large that there is not a reasonable chance of a significant loss to the insurer. If there is no such chance of loss, then the transaction may have the form of insurance, but not the substance (see the U.S. Financial Accounting Standards Board pronouncement number 113: "Accounting and Reporting for Reinsurance of Short-Duration and Long-Duration Contracts").6. Calculable loss: There are two elements that must be at least estimable, if not formally calculable: the probability of loss, and the attendant cost. Probability of loss is generally an empirical exercise, while cost has more to do with the ability of a reasonable person in possession of a copy of the insurance policy and a proof of loss associated with a claim presented under that policy to make a reasonably definite and objective evaluation of the amount of the loss recoverable as a result of the claim.7. Limited risk of catastrophically large losses: Insurable losses are ideally independent and non-catastrophic, meaning that the losses do not happen all at once and individual losses are not severe enough to bankrupt the insurer; insurers may prefer to limit their exposure to a loss from a single event to some small portion of their capital bas