Writing in an Academic Style: Sentences and Paragraphs Louise Livesey Academic Skills Adviser This workshop will: − Provide guiding principles when writing.

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<ul><li> Slide 1 </li> <li> Writing in an Academic Style: Sentences and Paragraphs Louise Livesey Academic Skills Adviser This workshop will: Provide guiding principles when writing for assessment at the sentence level Explain the structure of paragraphs for academic writing Offer practical follow-on resources for enhancing your academic style when writing </li> <li> Slide 2 </li> <li> The Plan 1.Guidelines to sentence content and length 2.Adding impact to your sentences 3.Structure of paragraphs 4.Resources for enhancing your academic writing style </li> <li> Slide 3 </li> <li> no sentence is longer than 1 lines there is one point for each sentence words are not repeated unnecessarily punctuation is used appropriately 1.Guidelines to sentence content and length </li> <li> Slide 4 </li> <li> It is possible to argue that almost all advertisements are informative. Indeed, as we have already seen, some appear to be wholly concerned with this. Although government bodies, releasing warnings about smoking or the use of domestic fire alarms, are clearly intent on changing our behaviour, they are still concerned to give the public what they believe is vital information. 1.Guidelines to sentence content and length </li> <li> Slide 5 </li> <li> Activity 1 But here lies the problem: we seem to talk about three different things when we describe something as a need. First, there is the strongest case: the need for certain things, like food and water, to maintain the minimum biological levels necessary for survival. Second, there are those things we need in order to maintain a good quality of life, like adequate education, housing and a clean environment, to which we believe we are entitled. Finally, there are those things we might describe as social needs created by living in a particular society or part of the world where these things are normal. Some are created by advertising, others by governments and organisations that influence our expectations. Advertisers lead us to believe that we all need annual holidays, fast cars, the latest fashions, even smart phones and table computers, while governments promote our need for national identity and a sense of community. 1.Guidelines to sentence content and length </li> <li> Slide 6 </li> <li> End of a sentence LOW IMPACT: Youve never had it so good, thanks to my government. BETTER IMPACT: Thanks to my government, youve never had it so good. BEST IMPACT: Youve never had it so good. MAKE YOUR POINT AND STOP: DONT WRITE ANYMORE 2.Adding impact to your sentences </li> <li> Slide 7 </li> <li> 1.Introductory sentence makes the topic of the paragraph clear 2.Middle sentences develop the theme, provide evidence, and follow each other logically 3.Last sentence summarises and/or leads into next paragraph 3.Structure of paragraphs </li> <li> Slide 8 </li> <li> On the outbreak of the Crimean War, Mary volunteered her services to the British Army. Although she had worked for the army before, at its own request, this time she was turned down. Undaunted, Mary made her own way to the war zone. Once in the Crimea, she not only nursed the soldiers, but also ran a hotel and sold food, wine and medicines. 3.Structure of paragraphs </li> <li> Slide 9 </li> <li> Activity 2 Student numbers and the diversity of the student population have increased considerably in the UK in recent years. This diversity poses a great challenge to universities to ensure the progression of students from different educational backgrounds and abilities. The post-1992 universities in particular, with their larger share of students from non- traditional backgrounds, have introduced a range of strategies to support student learning (Paczuska, 2002; Thomas, 2002). A common approach to providing learning support is by extra-curricular study skills courses, often offered in dedicated learning support centres (Gamache, 2002; Haggis &amp; Pouget, 2002). This approach is referred to as bolt-on (Bennett et al., 2000), as opposed to the built-in or embedded approach where learning is developed through the subject teaching. As will be discussed in more detail below, the bolt-on approach has severe limitations, mainly because it separates study skills from the process and content of learning. 3.Structure of paragraphs </li> <li> Slide 10 </li> <li> http://www.phrasebank.manchester.ac.uk/ http://www.chompchomp.com/ www.brad.ac.uk/academic-skills 4.Resources for enhancing your academic writing style </li> <li> Slide 11 </li> <li> Cottrell, S. (2001) Teaching Study Skills and Supporting Learning. Palgrave Study Guides. 4th ed. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan Ltd. Cottrell, S. (2013) The Study Skills Handbook. Palgrave Study Guides. 4th ed. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan Ltd. Coyle, M. and Peck, J. (2005) Write It Right: A handbook for students. Palgrave Study Guides. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan Ltd. Greetham, B. (2013) How to Write Better Essay. 3 rd ed. Palgrave Study Guides. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan Ltd. Neville, C. (2009) How to Improve Your Assignment Results. Maidenhead: OUP. Wingate, U. (2006) Doing away with study skills. Teaching in Higher Education. Vol. 11:4. pp.457-469 [online] Available at: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/13562510600874268#tabModule [Accessed 18.7.2014] http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/13562510600874268#tabModule References </li> <li> Slide 12 </li> <li> Academic Skills Advice Service Where are we? Chesham Building B0.23 What do we do? Support undergraduate students with their academic skills by running clinics and workshops, having bookable appointment slots, and enabling students to drop-in for Instant Action. Who are we? Michael and Helen specialise in Maths Support; Lucy and Russell advise students on academic study skills; and I (Louise) deliver the workshops When can you come for help? Everyday both face to face and on-line How do I get in touch? Email: academic- skills@brad.ac.uk or website www.brad.ac.uk/academic- skillsacademic- skills@brad.ac.uk </li> <li> Slide 13 </li> <li> Any questions? </li> </ul>

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