Worth a Thousand Words: The Art Critic/Curator Project Seeing Art and the Art of Seeing Point of View  Tone  Conflict  Symbolism  Theme  Persuasion

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  • Worth a Thousand Words: The Art Critic/Curator ProjectSeeing Art and the Art of SeeingPoint of View Tone Conflict Symbolism Theme Persuasion Prompt:Oral Response through Art Critics and Curators ConferenceParticipate in a group discussion as an art critic or as curator. An art critic describes, analyzes, interprets and decides how he or she feels about the piece of art and its message. A curator is a person who creatively brings together an exhibition by selecting pieces of art to reflect a certain theme. Either as an art critic, or as a curator, select at least two paintings to discuss.

  • StepsPREPARATIONPrepare for your discussion by 1. Describing, 2. Asking about, and 3. Making Connections to and between the Artworks.1.DESCRIBE: (List as many observations as possible)Look carefully at the work of art in front of you. What colors do you see in it? List the specific colors that you see. What objects do you see in the work of art in front of you? List the objects that you see. What is going on in this work of art? Mention whatever you see happening, no matter how small. 2. ASKING about the Artwork:Why does..?How?Why is the effect of?Why did?How does..?What does?

    3.CONNECTING Personally to the Artwork:Does anything you have noticed in this work of art so far (colors, objects, or events) remind you of something in your own life?

  • Steps Continued:PREPARATION Continued:4.CONNECTIONS btw. the Artworks: Do they look alike? What is similar about the way they look( e.g. objects, events, feelings, the way they are made)? What is different?

    5. Fill out the Dense Question Strategy Tool. Have at least one for each category.

    World/Other Art Work QuestionBased on knowledge of history, contemporary events, other cultures, other texts and artworksArtwork & Viewer QuestionCombines knowledge of artwork with readers own experiences, values, and ideas.Viewer QuestionBased on viewers experiences, values and ideas that relate thematically to the artworkArtwork QuestionBased on 1 Artwork onlyViewer & Other QuestionCombines knowledge of viewer with knowledge of other sources (another artwork or the world)Artwork/Other QuestionCombines knowledge of artwork with other sourcesDense Question: Combines knowledge of all 3 areas.

  • Steps Continued.ORAL DISCUSSION6. PARTICIPATE orally in the Art Critics & Curators Conference. Highlight as many questions and ideas you want to bring up during the discussion so you can transcribe and reflect on your participation. You may also bring up and answer the following the questions during discussion. Be sure to cite specifics from the artwork. -What do you see? (Mention the most important observations)-What is going on? -----What do you want to know about the work/s? (Four directions of thought)SourceWhat is the source of this work/s main idea or emotion? What inspired the artwork?Examples-What are some examples of (an idea) in the work(s)? What are some examples of the works similarities and differences?Antithesis How do disagree or conflict with this work/s ideas or emotions?ImplicationWhy do these work/s matter to me or to the world How can you relate personally to the work/s?---What might the artists have felt when he or she made this work of art? What could you feel about these works?What ideas and emotions do you think this work of art expresses? (title words?)

  • 7. TRANSCRIPT and REFLECTION: Create a log and transcript where you record your oral participation in this conference. How did you contribute orally to the learning you and your classmates experienced? (Questions you asked, answered, comments or observations you made etc.) Next, reflect. What have you discovered from looking at these works of art? Have you learned anything about yourself or others? Do you like these work of art? Why or why not? Has your reaction to the works changed? Do you like it more or less than you did in the beginning? Why?

  • RuBRIC for ORAL DISCUSSION Continued. Discussion Skills: The Speaker Initiates discussion activelydoesnt just wait for others to speak. Takes turns and does not dominate the conversation. Listens attentively, maintaining eye contact, respectful norms and offering feedback to peers. Maintains an academic tone by entering and participating in the conversation with appropriate vocabulary. Contributes to a fluid exchange of ideas.The Speaker.1 23 4 5Does BelowMeets Proficient ExceedsNot Meet ExpectationsBasic ExpectationsExpectationsExpectations

  • RuBRIC for ORAL DISCUSSIONContent: The SpeakerChooses specific details to share and interpret.Finds examples of symbols, conflict, theme etc. in the artworks.Connects artworks to other texts, including personal experiences.Connects and compares artworks, showing similarities and differencesClarifies confusion with questions or intelligent guesses.Asks questions, especially dense questions about artworks in order to prompt other speakers to talk.Creates multiple meanings by honoring and building alternate interpretations.

  • Stillman, Marie Spartali. Antigone Burying Polynices 1848.

  • Brodowski, Antoni. Polish. Antigone. 1828. Oil on Canvas

  • Study for Antigone. 1940s. Watercolor on Wove Paper

  • Oliva, Manuel Lopez. Cuba. Antigona. 1990 Oil on Canvas

  • Rothko, Mark. American. Antigone. 1941. Oil & Charcoal on Canvas

  • Jalabeat, Charles Francois. French. The Plague of Thebes. 1819-1901. Oil on Canvas

  • Fuseli, Henry. British. Oedipus Cursing His Son, Polynices. 1786 Oil on Canvas

  • Rinehart, William Henry. Antigone Pouring a Libation Over the Corpse of her Brother Polynices. 1867 Marble

  • Leighton, Frederik English. Antigone.1882. Oil on Canvas

  • Beck, 1994 Antigone Mourned. Oil on Linen

  • Fuseli, Henry. British. Oedipus Cursing His Son, Polynices. 1786 Oil on CanvasBrodowski, Antoni. Polish. Antigone. 1828. Oil on CanvasRinehart, William Henry. Antigone Pouring a Libation Over the Corpse of her Brother Polynices. 1867 MarbleStillman, Marie Spartali. Antigone Burying Polynices 1848.Leighton, Frederik English. Antigone.1882. Oil on CanvasJalabeat, Charles Francois. French. The Plague of Thebes. 1819-1901. Oil on CanvasRothko, Mark. American. Antigone. 1941. Oil & Charcoal on Canvas Study for Antigone. 1940s. Watercolor on Wove PaperBeck, Rosemarie. American. 1991 Antigone Before Creon. Oil on Linen1994 Antigone Mourned. Oil on LinenWalkkuski, Wieslaw. Polish. Antigona. 1990. PosterOliva, Manuel Lopez. Cuba. Antigona. 1990 Oil on CanvasMinguillon, David. Spain. 2005. Antigona. Paint, Charcoal, Acrylic and Collage