Why Graphic Novels?

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Why Graphic Novels?. …isn’t interpreting pictures in graphic novels easier than reading plain text?. Skeptics Ask …. …are we “ dumbing down” the expectations?. They utilize multiple intelligences:. Spatial. Linguistic. Interpersonal. Source: Lyga , A. & Lyga , B., (2004). - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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Why Graphic Novels?Skeptics Ask isnt interpreting pictures in graphic novels easier than reading plain text?are we dumbing down the expectations?

They utilize multiple intelligences:LinguisticSpatialInterpersonal

Source: Lyga, A. & Lyga, B., (2004)Linguistic Intelligence:These types of learners enjoy writing and are very good with words. Graphic novels tend to challenge these types of learners by requiring the reader to infer meaning from the word and wordless panels.

Spatial Intelligence:These types of people with this type of intelligence are visual learners.

Graphic novels provide a visual representation of what is occurring in their heads as they read so this format is a natural and comfortable fit for this learner.

Interpersonal Intelligence:These children are good communicators and understand others' feelings and motives.

These types of learners enjoy reading graphic novels "because the visual components tap into their strong sense of people, feelings, and intuitions."

They help teach visual literacy:Graphic novels by their very nature help the student who struggles with visualizing while reading.

They provide a balance of text and graphics (visual cueing) so the student is aided in the interpretation. Give the students a "comfort zone" with reading.

Source: Lyga, A. & Lyga, B. (2004)

Reluctant ReadersCharacteristics of reluctant readers: Can read Intimidated by text Struggle to decode

Graphic novels can help: Provide picture clues Less text = less intimidating Seem easier due to pictures

Source: Lyga, A. & Lyga, B. (2004)Visually Dependent Students:

Due to a constant barrage of visual stimuli, students have become accustomed to immediate feedback and hard to miss visual clues (Lyga, 2004).

These students are unlike the reluctant readers and the child who cannot visualize. These students simply "don't want to be bothered.

Source: Lyga, A. & Lyga, B. (2004)

Sources Used: Butcher, K. T., & Manning, M. L. (2004). Bringing Graphic Novels into a Schools Curriculum. The Clearing House, 78(2), 67-71. Retrieved October 17, 2009 from Wilson Web database.

Carter, J. B. (2009). Going Graphic. Educational Leadership, 66(6), 68-72. Retrieved October 17, 2009 from Wilson Web database.

Dickinson, G. (2007). The question: Where should I shelve graphic novels?. Knowledge Quest, 35(5), 56-57. Retrieved October 17, 2009 from Wilson Web database.

Sources Used: Lyga, A. A. W., & Lyga, B. (2004) Graphic Novels in Your Media Center. Westport, CT: Libraries Unlimited.

Mooney, M. (2002). Graphic novels: How they can work in libraries. Book Report, 21(3), 18-19. Retrieved on October 17, 2009 from Wilson Web database.

Sources Used: Rudiger, H. M., & Schliesman, M. (2007). Graphic Novels and School Libraries. Knowledge Quest, 36(2), 57-59. Retrieved October 17, 2009 from Wilson Web database.

Schwartz, G. E. (2002). Graphic Novels for Multiple Literacies. Journal of Adolescent & Adult Literacy 46(3), 262-265. Retrieved October 17, 2009 from Wilson Web database.

Weiner, S. (2002). Beyond Superheroes: Comics Get Serious. Library Journal, 127(2), 55-58. Retrieved October 17, 2009 from Wilson Web database.