Why do we buy what we buy? What different forces converge to make us buy something?

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  • Slide 1
  • Why do we buy what we buy? What different forces converge to make us buy something?
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  • Part 2: Ad Campaign Think like a disciplinarian: filmmaker Creative problem solving: storyboard design process Commercial production Radio spot: scripting and recording Individual writing components
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  • Structure enhances creativity: A lot of what weve done this year has been connected by an overarching big idea. plot text structure TTQA thinking tools/symbols SPIED poetic devices persuasive techniques tree mapping imagery storyboarding
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  • As you listen and discuss today, be thinking about... Why do filmmakers use storyboards? Whats their value? How do they contribute to filmmakers ability to be creative?
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  • A storyboard is a visual outline of a film. Its a sequence of sketches that show the progression, pace, and scale of camera shots. Its a visual story, like a comic book, but it doesnt contain dialogue. Contributing definition
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  • Peter Jackson, the Academy Award winning director of the Lord of the Rings series, says that he makes a movie on paper first, then he films it. Filmmakers use storyboards to visually outline and draft their ideas for a film (or commercial). - Storyboarding helps filmmakers see if (and how) the ideas they have in their head will work on the screen.
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  • Think like a filmmaker Directing is very difficult and takes intuition and talent. Storyboards illustrate what shot the director hopes to frame for the audience. Directors view everything in terms of the shot, or how the camera is positioned to capture the action. They also think in terms of frame, or what the audience will actually see on the movie screen on TV. Think zoom-in/zoom-out or cropping.
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  • Storyboards are outlines and may be changed during shooting as needed. Look at the example. What are some differences you see between the storyboard sketch and the final product?
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  • Storyboards give details like how the camera should move as action unfolds and a description of whats happening. 1 2 3 4 5 Can you identify the sequence of these shots? Are you sure?
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  • Storyboards arent all the same. Some are more detailed. Others are simple sketches to show scale.
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  • Shot variety is essential to appeal.
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  • Shot variety is essential to appeal.
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  • Shot variety is essential to appeal.
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  • Planned simplicity works just as well and sometimes better than complexity.
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  • Back to that big idea In the context of todays lesson Storyboards are a structure that enhance filmmakers creativity. Structure enhances creativity.
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  • Todays Project Goals 1.Complete Free Brainstorm - Share and write down as many commercial concepts as you can. Dont reject any ideas. Everything and anything should be included in your brainstorm. (10 minutes) 2.Build Background Knowledge - Take notes on storyboarding, camera techniques, and filmmaking. 3. Get back to small groups. Continue brainstorm with new knowledge.
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  • Yesterday we learned about one structure that enhances the creativity of filmmakers: storyboards. Today, well take a look at another structure that contributes to filmmakers creativity: camera techniques camera angles and different types of camera shots. Structure enhances creativity.
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  • As you listen and discuss today, be thinking about... Why do filmmakers use different camera techniques? How do they work? How do they contribute to filmmakers ability to be creative?
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  • Camera Angles vs. Camera Shots Camera ANGLE examples
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  • Basic Camera Angles camera angle: angle at which the camera is positioned for a shot. High-angle shots are shot from above. They can make a object look small; they tend to make the object seem smaller and weaker. The camera is usually located above the eye line. Low-angle shots are shot from beneath. They often make a object appear larger or more important. They can also make an object look more imposing and/or intimidating.
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  • Eye-level Eye-level shots: camera is placed at the subjects height. Unlike high or low angle shots, these are more common as they lack dramatic power theyre neutral.
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  • High-angle (from above) High-angle shots are shot from above. They can make a object look small; they tend to make the object seem smaller and weaker. The camera is usually located above the eye line.
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  • Low angle (from beneath) Low-angle shots are shot from beneath. They often make a object appear larger or more important. They can also make an object look more imposing and/or intimidating.
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  • Point-of-view Point-of-view shots or POV are usually filmed from where the characters eyes would be. Often used in horror movies to suggest a menacing presence. Nemos POV
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  • Over the shoulder Over-the-shoulder shot the name says it all the back of the shoulder and the persons head frames this image.
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  • Camera SHOT examples Camera Angles vs. Camera Shots Camera ANGLE examples
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  • Basic Camera Shots -- Scale 1. Long /wide shot: A long shot (full shot or body shot) usually shows the entire object. Using a long shot you get the opportunity to show an object in relation to its surroundings. 2. Medium shot: A shot showing a body from the waist up. This allows for relatively clear facial expressions and body language at the same time. Commonly used in news reports. 3. Close-up shot: The close-up shot presents an object in great detail. The surrounding environment and other objects are hardly visible. Sub-types: split screen, confessional, establishing, object 4. Extreme close-up shot: The shot frames part of the object so tightly that nothing else can be seen.
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  • 1. Long /wide shot: A long shot (full shot or body shot) usually shows the entire object. Using a long shot you get the opportunity to show an object in relation to its surroundings.
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  • 2. Medium shot: A shot showing a body from the waist up. This allows for relatively clear facial expressions and body language at the same time. Commonly used in news reports.
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  • 3. Close-up shot: The close-up shot presents an object in great detail. The surrounding environment and other objects are hardly visible.
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  • 4. Extreme close-up shot: The shot frames part of the object so tightly that nothing else can really be seen.
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  • Lets look at a few more examples
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  • Close-up
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  • Extreme Close-Up Shot
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  • Medium Shot
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  • Long Shot
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  • Confessional
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  • Split Screen
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  • Camera techniques like shots and angles help filmmakers to create more appealing final products.