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Veteran's Treatment Court Project

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  • VETERANS TREATMENT COURT PROJECTIntroduction

  • Introduction

  • PurposeProvide a general overviewWhyWhatHow

  • Background of the projectMy BackgroundThe National Center for Veteran Studies at the University of Utah (NCVS)Directed Research

  • Intended audienceAssumptionsLegal CommunityJudges, prosecution and defense attorneysService Providers

  • Overview

  • How to use this courseChaptersFormatVideo and PDF slideshowDesign PurposeCrash course

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  • JUST WHAT IS A DEPLOYMENT?One soldiers perspective

  • Personal Deployment ExperiencePre-mobilization (3 months)Short leaveCamp Bucca (9 months)MissionDemobilizationReunionReintegration

  • Saying Goodbye

  • Pre-mobilization training

  • Gas Chamber

  • Pepper Spray

  • Short leave home

  • Camp Bucca (9 months)

  • Living Quarters

  • Responding to IDF

  • Friends

  • Missing Family

  • Christmas

  • Travel

  • Mid-tour leave

  • Opportunities to do good

  • Preparing to come home

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  • CHAPTER IWho are Veterans

  • Topics CoveredGeneral overview of military structureWho makes up the military communityThe military justice systemWhen does one become a Veteran

  • A general overviewMilitary Structure

  • Military StructureDepartment of DefenseUnited States Army (USA)United States Navy (USN)United States Marine Corp (USMC)United States Air Force (USAF)Department of Homeland SecurityUnited States Coast Guard (USCG)

  • Military StructureArmy1775Active Duty: 522,388Reserve: 202,000National Guard: 352,000Mission: The Armys mission is to fight and win our Nations wars by providing prompt, sustained land dominance across the full range of military operations and spectrum of conflict in support of combatant commanders.Sources: www.todaysmilitary.com & www.army.mil & http://open.dodlive.mil/data-gov/demographics/

  • Military StructureNavyEstablished: 1775Active: 337,690 Reserve: 61,891Mission: The mission of the Navy is to maintain, train and equip combat-ready Naval forces capable of winning wars, deterring aggression and maintaining freedom of the seas.Sources www.todaysmilitary.com & http://open.dodlive.mil/data-gov/demographics/ & www.navy.mil

  • Military StructureMarine CorpsEstablished: 1775Active: 184,000Reserve: 42,602MissionThe Marine Corps shall be organized, trained, and equipped to provide fleet marine forces of combined arms, together with supporting air components, for service with the fleet in the seizure or defense of advanced naval bases and for the conduct of such land operations as may be essential to the prosecution of a naval campaign. - 10 U.S.C. 5063

    Sources www.todaysmilitary.com & http://open.dodlive.mil/data-gov/demographics/

  • Military StructureAir ForceEstablishedActive: 352,000Reserve: 109,622Guard: 160,700Mission: The mission of the United States Air Force isto fly, fight and win...in air, space and cyberspace. Sources www.todaysmilitary.com & http://open.dodlive.mil/data-gov/demographics/ & www.af.mil

  • Military StructureOfficer RankCommissioned officerWarrant officerEnlisted RankLower enlistedNon-commissioned officer

  • Types of punishment commanders discretionRestriction of dutiesDetention/confinementForfeiture of payReduction in rankExtra duties

  • Court Martial OffensesSex OffensesPerjury and False StatementsAssault and related offensesEscape and related offensesHomicideDesertionDisobedienceTheft OffensesRobberyFraud OffensesConduct unbecoming an officerAlcohol and drug offenses

  • Military DischargeAdministrative HonorableMeets or exceeds the requirementsFull benefitsGeneralSome form of non-judicial contentUnder Other Than Honorable ConditionsSignificant departure from military conductLose most benefitsJudicial ProcessBad ConductPunitive dischargeNearly all benefits lostDishonorableCan only be given through a General Court Martial for serious offenses (i.e. murder, rape and desertion)Source: http://www.eielson.af.mil/news/story.asp?id=123117744

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  • OverviewPart IRecent Combat DeploymentsPart IIReactions to op-tempoTroop issues stemming from OEF/OIF

  • OEF/OIF Operational Tempo (op-tempo)Part 1: Recent Combat Deployments

  • Stressors from OEF/OIFRisk of death or injuryWitness death of buddiesKill others in combatConstant fear of threatProlonged separation Sexual TraumaMore severe physical traumaTBIPrior traumatic eventPTSDSubstance AbuseSuicideReunion/Reintegration issuesCausePossible EffectSources: Mental Health Effects of Serving in Afghanistan and Iraq, available at http://www.ptsd.va.gov/public/pages/overview-mental-health-effects.asp & Returning From the War Zone: A guide for Military Personnel, PDF guide available at http://www.ptsd.va.gov/public/reintegration/guide-pdf/SMGuide.pdf

  • Common reactionsTrouble sleeping, overly tiredStomach upset, trouble eatingHeadaches and sweating when thinking of the warRapid heartbeat or breathingExisting health problems become worseExperiencing shock, being numb, unable to feel happyBad dreams, nightmaresFlashbacks or frequent unwanted memoriesAngerFeeling nervous, helpless or fearfulFeeling guilty, self-blame, shameFeeling sad, rejected, or abandonedAgitated, easily upset, irritated, or annoyedFeeling hopeless about the futureCommon Physical ReactionsCommon Mental and Emotional ReactionsSource: Returning From the War Zone: A guide for Military Personnel, PDF guide available at http://www.ptsd.va.gov/public/reintegration/guide-pdf/SMGuide.pdf

  • Common reactions, cont.Trouble concentratingEdgy, jumpy and easily startledBeing on guard, always alert, concerned too much about safety and securityAggressive driving habitsAvoiding people or places related to the traumaToo much drinking, smoking, or drug useLack of exercise, poor diet, or health careProblems doing regular tasks at work or schoolBehavioral ReactionsBehavioral ReactionsSource: Returning From the War Zone: A guide for Military Personnel, PDF guide available at http://www.ptsd.va.gov/public/reintegration/guide-pdf/SMGuide.pdf

  • My StoryI gave the briefings about reunion/reintegrationEffects from aboveSlamming door at law schoolFelt strong and like I didnt need helpHand to hand with brothersHoneymoon and then troubleConnecting with other vets

  • What about those that leave the military?2002 20091 million troops left OEF/OIF46% went to the VA for services48% percent that went in for care have mental health problems (220,800 troops)Source: Mental Health Effects of Serving in Afghanistan and Iraq, available at http://www.ptsd.va.gov/public/pages/overview-mental-health-effects.asp

  • Why dont vets reach out for help?Concern over being seen as weakConcern about being treated differently Concern that others would lose confidence in them Concerns about privacy They prefer to rely on family and friends They don't believe treatment is effective Concerns about side effects of treatments Problems with access, such as cost or location of treatmentSource: Mental Health Effects of Serving in Afghanistan and Iraq, available at http://www.ptsd.va.gov/public/pages/overview-mental-health-effects.asp

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  • ALL ABOUT PTSD

  • What is PTSDPosttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is an anxiety disorder that can occur after you have been through a traumatic event.Sources: What is PTSD?, National Center for PTSD, USDVA, available at http://www.ptsd.va.gov/public/pages/handouts-pdf/handout_What_is_PTSD.pdf & What is PTSD? from http://www.ptsd.va.gov/public/pages/what-is-ptsd.asp

  • Likelihood of getting PTSDHow intense the trauma was or how long it lastedIf you lost someone you were close to or were hurtHow close you were to the eventHow strong your reaction wasHow much you felt in control of eventsHow much help and support you got after the event

    Sources: What is PTSD?, National Center for PTSD, USDVA, available at http://www.ptsd.va.gov/public/pages/handouts-pdf/handout_What_is_PTSD.pdf & What is PTSD? from http://www.ptsd.va.gov/public/pages/what-is-ptsd.asp

  • Onset of PTSDCan be immediateMonthsYears30% of individuals develop chronic symptomsSources: What is PTSD?, National Center for PTSD, USDVA, available at http://www.ptsd.va.gov/public/pages/handouts-pdf/handout_What_is_PTSD.pdf & What is PTSD? from http://www.ptsd.va.gov/public/pages/what-is-ptsd.asp

  • Symptoms of PTSDReliving the eventAvoiding situations that remind you of the eventFeeling numbFeeling keyed up (also called hyperarousal)Sources: What is PTSD?, National Center for PTSD, USDVA, available at http://www.ptsd.va.gov/public/pages/handouts-pdf/handout_What_is_PTSD.pdf & What is PTSD? from http://www.ptsd.va.gov/public/pages/what-is-ptsd.asp

  • Problems associated with PTSDDrinking or drug problems.Feelings of hopelessness, shame, or despair.Employment problems.Relationships problems including divorce and violence.Physical symptoms.Sources: What is PTSD?, National Center for PTSD, USDVA, available at http://www.ptsd.va.gov/public/pages/handouts-pdf/handout_What_is_PTSD.pdf & What is PTSD? from http://www.ptsd.va.gov/public/pages/what-is-ptsd.asp

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  • TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURYAll About TBI from Combat

  • What is TBI?Traumatic brain injury (TBI) occurs from a sudden blow or jolt to the head.TBI is the injury, not the symptomsSimilar to a concussionMild,

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