Click here to load reader

UNFORMATTED DRAFT FOR CONTENT REVIEW ONLY 512CE168-4684-4855-9CD9... · PDF file 5.4 VISION SUMMARY 45 5.5 ESTIMATED CAPITAL, OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE COSTS 47 6 IMPLEMENTATION

  • View
    1

  • Download
    0

Embed Size (px)

Text of UNFORMATTED DRAFT FOR CONTENT REVIEW ONLY 512CE168-4684-4855-9CD9... · PDF file 5.4...

  • UNFORMATTED DRAFT FOR CONTENT REVIEW ONLY

  • Parks and Recreation Master Plan

    2   

  • Town of Pittsboro

    3   

    CONTENTS  5 LONG-RANGE VISION 04

    5.1 GUIDING PRINCIPLES 05 5.2 CONCEPTUAL LONG-RANGE VISION 10 5.3 ELEMENTS OF THE LONG-RANGE VISION 13 5.4 VISION SUMMARY 45 5.5 ESTIMATED CAPITAL,

    OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE COSTS 47 6 IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY              50 

    6.1 ADDITIONAL PARKS PLANNING STAFF AND PARKS AND RECREATION STRATEGIC PLAN 51

    6.2 DEVELOPMENT OF A 25-YEAR FUNDING PLAN 51 6.3 UPDATE OF SUBDIVISION REGULATIONS 53 6.4 SHORT-TERM ACTION PLAN 56

     

  • Parks and Recreation Master Plan

    4   

    5.0 LONG-RANGE VISION

    Pittsboro faces a common challenge, and a unique opportunity. The challenge is to grow from a small, quaint town of 4,500 people – to a municipality of over 60,000 people – without sacrificing the charm, values, assets, and character that residents hold so dear. Very few communities in the United States have done this successfully; most end up repeating the same mistakes as every other community, resulting in unsustainable development patterns and suburban sprawl. Pittsboro has the opportunity to do it right the first time. Surrounded by thousands of acres of undeveloped land, the Town can form and shape its growth in a manner which is sustainable, resilient, and livable.

    The Town’s public realm – including its parks, trails, streets, civic spaces, and natural areas – has the potential to form the framework for a livable, resilient, and sustainable community. As stated in the Existing Conditions Analysis, the Town has a tremendous opportunity to create a world class public realm that meets the needs of existing and future residents; protects natural resources; creates an interconnected network of bikeways and trails; and generates multiple economic, social, and environmental benefits.

    The purpose of this chapter is to define a long-range vision for the Town’s public realm, based on residents’ priorities, current trends, principles of healthy communities, and best practices in parks and recreation planning. The vision will provide a decision-making framework for meeting parks and recreation needs; a long-range vision for an integrated public realm; and a land-use vision for connectivity, parks, open spaces, and quality of life.

  • Town of Pittsboro

    5   

    5.1 GUIDING PRINCIPLES

    There are no state or national standards that define the “most appropriate” vision for the public realm or response to residents’ needs and priorities; each community must decide what facilities and programs to provide based on community values, ideology, preferences, and finances. In the absence of standards, best practices and guiding principles can form the foundation for Pittsboro’s parks and recreation system. Following are several examples from national experts:

    The Excellent City Parks System

    First, Peter Harnik of the Trust for Public Realm stated that there are seven measures of an excellent city park system:

    1. A clear expression of purpose

    2. Ongoing planning and community involvement

    3. Sufficient assets in land, staffing, and equipment to meet the system’s goals

    4. Equitable access

    5. User satisfaction

    6. Safety from physical hazards and crime

    7. Benefits for the city beyond the boundaries of the parks (http://cloud.tpl.org/pubs/ccpe_excellentcityparks_2006.pdf)

    The Integrated Public Realm

    Second, a parks system should be planned within the context of the larger public realm, rather than as stand-alone sites. Parks, greenways, civic spaces, natural areas, and historic and cultural areas should be connected by complete streets, trails, and sidewalks. Utility corridors and drainage swales should be designed to accommodate bicyclists and pedestrians as part of an interconnected network. And stormwater treatment ponds should also be designed as public parks. Yale University’s Alexander Garvin notes that “the public realm is our common property. It is the fundamental element in any community – the framework around which everything grows” (Garvin, 2013, p. 14). Figure 5.1 is a schematic diagram illustrating a typical community public realm system.

  • Parks and Recreation Master Plan

    6   

    Figure 5.1 The Public Realm

    Healthy Communities

    Third, there is broad consensus – and compelling research and scientific evidence – that a well- planned and maintained public realm contributes to healthier communities. Various organizations have established specific principles and policies for designing communities to generate health benefits. For example, the American Planning Association’s Healthy Communities Policy Guide states that the design of a community “has a direct effect on the health of its residents. Land development patterns, zoning ordinances, and land use classifications impact walkability, access to key services like healthy food, and access to transportation options. An understanding of how the built environment affects public health is a vital component in the creation of vibrant, active spaces, and places that have a strong positive impact on an individual’s health. It is also critical for planners to use this understanding, and the guide generally, as the standard for creation of good public policy.”1 Specific healthy community policy outcomes related to parks, recreation, and the public realm include:

                                                                 1 American Planning Association. (2017). Healthy Communities Policy Guide. Retrieved from  https://www.planning.org/policy/guides/adopted/healthycommunities/ 

  • Town of Pittsboro

    7   

     Compact urban areas and complete neighborhoods that meet the daily needs of all people within comfortable walking or bicycling distance of their homes.

     Redevelopment of suburban areas to make them more walkable and bikeable through plans, regulations, and incentives that encourage more compact development forms.

     Communities designed so that physical activity is a part of everyday activities and is the easy choice.

     Prioritization of funding for infrastructure that helps communities build more compact, walkable neighborhoods, and provides robust transit and active transportation options.

     Engagement of local residents in planning for more walkable and bikeable urban environments, including place-based health strategies that facilitate the design of healthy communities and healthy housing for people of all ages and abilities.

     Development of trail systems and other publicly accessible community amenities in urban, suburban, and rural areas that enable residents to participate in robust exercise.

     Adoption of placemaking strategies and policies that advance equitable, healthy designs for public spaces in order to create safe and comfortable places with a sense of community for people of all ages and abilities, regardless of their mode of transportation choice.

     Development of effective and efficient public transportation networks at the local and regional scale that are supported by location-efficient development practices, such as Transit Oriented Development, affordable housing, and functional public space.

     Policies that provide options to all people, especially those at higher risk for poor health outcomes, for access to: affordable housing; safe and convenient transportation; safe and healthy places for work, life, and play; a healthy environment, especially clean air and water; health care; social interaction; and opportunities for inclusion and culture.

     Incentives to attract other organizations to provide community recreation facilities in areas not served by public recreation centers in order to improve opportunities for physical activity in underserved communities.

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) produced a complementary evidence-based guide to building healthy communities, the highlights of which are summarized below:

    Physical Activity:

    1. Protects against heart disease

    2. Protects against cancer

    3. Reduces likelihood of depression

    4. Reduces occurrence of other diseases such as osteoporosis, gall bladder disease, and strokes

  • Parks and Recreation Master Plan

    8   

    Healthy Community Design:

    1. Promotes physical activity

    2. Improves air quality

    3. Lowers risk of injuries – auto

    4. Increases social connectedness – sense of community

    5. Reduces effects of climate change

    6. Provides more contact with nature

    Components of Healthy Communities:

    8. Mixed land use

    9. Transportation alternatives

    10. Higher density

    11. Good pedestrian and bike infrastructure

    12. Affordable housing

    13. Community centers – activity centers – public squares

    14. Access to green spaces and parks2

    Similarly, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation compiled a ranking of health-related policies based on the degree by which they’re scientifically supported. Policies are assessed in terms of their effect on factors that drive health outcomes.3 Scientifically-supported policies direct

Search related