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  • UCL IOE Press catalogue Autumn 2017 TrenthamBooks

    IOE_New Titles Catalogue Autumn 2017_4p.indd 1 25/08/2017 15:55

  • UCL IOE PRESS AND TRENTHAM BOOKS

    2 For more news and inspection copy requests go to www.ucl-ioe-press.com

    ‘[This book] would not only have given me a sense of what I had missed at school, but also, as a future teacher, some idea of what a good secondary education could, and even should, be about. It would not just be of interest to those hoping to go to university, but to any 18- or 22-year-old, as part of growing up and gaining a grasp, which I lacked, of the promise and excitement of the world I was about to be a citizen of.’ – From the Foreword by Professor Michael Young

    ‘What knowledge do our children need to know and why? How will they acquire the reason and imagination to ask: What is right, what is beauty, and what is truth? This book brings these profound questions back to the centre of educational enquiry where they belong. We all need to read it.’ – Professor Elizabeth Rata, School of Critical Studies in Education, University of Auckland

    The blurring of the distinctions between pedagogy and curriculum, and experience and knowledge, has resulted in a generation of teachers who are confused about the part that each of these plays in the education of children. Schools may still teach through subjects, but there is little consensus about what constitutes a subject and what they are for. The aim of this book is to contribute to a more robust rationale for, and understanding of, what schools should teach – the curriculum. This is not to dismiss the signifi cance of pedagogy, how children learn or the personal knowledge and experiences they bring to the classroom. Rather, to become a successful teacher depends upon understanding the respective roles of each. But the curriculum – what to teach – is logically prior to how to teach it. There is no more important question in education.

    ‘A highly accessible exploration of the relationship between social-realist approaches to knowledge production and ways of making such knowledge available through school subjects. Readable and thought-provoking.’ – John Beck, Emeritus Fellow, Homerton College, Cambridge, and former Chief Inspector of the Inner London Education Authority

    September 2017, 172 pages, 234 x 156mm, £19.99/$32.95 Paperback 978-1-78277-217-0 Kindle 978-1-78277-220-0 PDF 978-1-78277-218-7

    What Should Schools Teach? NEW Disciplines, subjects, and the pursuit of truth Edited by Alex Standish and Alka Sehgal-Cuthbert Foreword by Michael Young

    W h

    at S h

    o u

    ld S

    ch o

    o ls Teach?

    A lex S

    tand ish &

    A lka S

    ehgal C uthb

    ert (ed s)

    ISBN 978-1-85856-795-2

    9 781858 567952

    UCL Institute of Education Press

    20 Bedford Way

    London

    WC1H 0AL

    www.ucl-ioe-press.com

    ‘In the wake of the hysteria of school jihadi brides and terrorist sons, this timely and well researched book “lifts the veil” on the mythology of “bad Muslim mothers”, with powerful stories of love and educational commitment against the odds.’ — Heidi Safi a Mirza, Professor of Race, Faith and Culture, Goldsmiths, University of London

    ‘…a rare and compelling insight into the views of Muslim mothers about their children’s education … an essential read for all professionals who work in education.’ — Sameena Choudry, Founder of Equitable Education

    This book brings the voices of Muslim mothers into the discourse on parent–school relations. What they say is essential reading for teachers, student teachers, sociology of education students, policy-makers and those working with families.

    Suma Din’s study gives voice to over 50 women from a wide range of African, Arab and Asian backgrounds, all social classes, some of them immigrants but many of them born in the UK. They speak about the hijab, choice of schools, religious festivals, the curriculum, the Prevent strategy, sex and relationship education and much else.

    The book sheds light on their identities, experiences and challenges as they support their children through state schools in Britain.

    ‘The fi ndings of her study are of great importance, not just to policymakers but also Muslim communities in general … highly recommended for teachers, parents, policymakers and researchers.’ — Professor Tahir Abbas, Senior Research Fellow @RUSI

    Suma Din is a writer, researcher and educator who has worked with parents in the Adult Learning sector. She has over two decades’ experience in the voluntary sector, supporting women and children’s projects and interfaith work.

    Disciplines, subjects, and the pursuit of truth Edited by Alex Standish & Alka Sehgal Cuthbert

    What Should Schools Teach?

    IOE_What Should Schools Teach_2p.indd 1 20/08/2017 11:57

    IOE_New Titles Catalogue Autumn 2017_4p.indd 2 25/08/2017 15:55

  • UCL IOE PRESS AND TRENTHAM BOOKS

    For more news and inspection copy requests go to www.ucl-ioe-press.com 3

    ‘The relevance of Machiavelli to current FE leadership is made horribly clear in this ingenious, fresh and challenging collection of essays. Political theory is used to devastating but useful effect to open up a space in which it is possible to think about power and the principal differently.’ – Stephen J. Ball, Distinguished Service Professor of Sociology of Education, UCL Institute of Education, London

    The sequel to Further Education and the Twelve Dancing Princesses, this book is similarly playful – but deadly serious in intent. Using Machiavelli’s contested treatise The Prince as a metaphorical guide, each contributor takes a different perspective to interrogate leadership, agency and professionalism in FE. The book’s scope is as wide as the sector’s, and covers adult education and FE systems in the UK, Ireland and Australia. A must-read for anyone who cares about how and where the FE sector is being led.

    ‘This is a deeply refreshing and important contribution to the leadership literature of FE, written from the perspective of voices seldom heard. If read widely and taken seriously, this book could revolutionize FE leadership discourse, professionalism and practice.’ – Dr Lynne Sedgemore CBE, Former FE college principal, Chief Executive of the 157 Group (2008–15) and Centre for Excellence in Leadership (2004–8)

    ‘This book shines light on the dark arts of political street fi ghting in colleges. Machiavelli is the prism through which you will learn about how power between governments and colleges, and management and teachers, is exercised, resisted, exercised and resisted again. While the book shows just how brutal the exercise of power can be in the college sector, it also tells of resistance, courage, and hope. This is a book for all students of education. It is gripping reading.’ – Leesa Wheelahan, William G. Davis Chair in Community College Leadership, University of Toronto

    September 2017, 248 pages, 234 x 156mm, £24.99/$41.95 Paperback 978-1-85856-844-7 Kindle 978-1-85856-847-8 PDF 978-1-85856-845-4

    The Principal NEW Power and professionalism in FE Edited by Maire Daley, Kevin Orr and Joel Petrie

    Trentham Books

    T h

    e P rin

    cip al

    E

    d ited

    by M aire D

    aley, K evin O

    rr and Joel P

    etrie

    Power and Professionalism in FE

    Edited by Maire Daley, Kevin Orr and Joel Petrie

    UCL Institute of Education Press

    20 Bedford Way

    London

    WC1H 0AL

    www.ucl-ioe-press.com

    Trentham Books

    ISBN 978-1-85856-844-7

    9 781858 568447

    ‘The relevance of Machiavelli to current FE leadership is made horribly clear in this ingenious, fresh and challenging collection of essays. Political theory is used to devastating but useful effect to open up a space in which it is possible to think about power and the principal differently.’ — Stephen J. Ball, Distinguished Service Professor of Sociology of Education, UCL Institute of Education

    This collection examines how power is exercised and experienced in the Further Education sector. The sequel to Further Education and the Twelve Dancing Princesses, this book is similarly playful, but deadly serious in intent.

    Using Machiavelli’s celebrated and contested treatise The Prince as a metaphorical guide, the contributors each take a different perspective to interrogate leadership, agency and professionalism in FE. The scope of The Principal is as wide as the sector, with chapters on adult education and the FE systems throughout the UK and in Ireland and Australia. The writers share a fi erce commitment to FE and this book is a must-read for anyone who cares about how and where the FE sector is being led.

    ‘This book shines light on the dark arts of political street fi ghting in colleges. Machiavelli is the prism through which you will learn about how power between governments and colleges, and management and teachers, is exercised, resisted, exercised and resisted again …’ — Leesa Wheelahan, William G. Davis Chair in Community College Leadership, University of Toronto

    ‘Just when I was wondering what more damage politicians could possibly do to the vital FE sector, this book arrives … Together these 25 authors offer the sector the democratic practices needed for a journey of hope.’ — Frank Coffi eld, Emeritus Professor, UCL Institute of Education

    Maire Daley is the former Programme