Tuesday, February 1, 2005

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The February 1, 2005 issue of the Brown Daily Herald

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  • THE BROWN DAILY HERALD

    BY ROBBIE COREY-BOULETMETRO EDITOR

    As Rhode Island Education CommissionerPeter McWalters prepares to rule Friday onwhether to approve state intervention atProvidences troubled Hope High School,

    one local politician says hewants city leaders to thinklike visionaries as they tryto turn conditions at the

    school around.Ward 7 City Councilman John Igliozzi

    forwarded a proposal to local communityand educational leaders in December,calling for the city to demolish Hopes cur-rent building and sell its 18 acres of sur-rounding property. The state could thenuse the profits to construct three small,independent charter schools, he said.

    This plan entails the formation of pub-lic-private partnerships with Brown,Johnson and Wales University and theRhode Island School of Design. These pri-vate institutions which Igliozzi calledthe cream of the crop in their respectivedisciplines would each design a cur-riculum and operate one of the charterschools, overseeing approximately 400 to500 students, Igliozzi said.

    Brown would manage a general educa-tion high school, RISD would develop an

    arts program and Johnson and Waleswould control a school to specialize invocational training.

    Both RISD and Johnson and Wales con-tacted Igliozzi after receiving his proposal,and he said he hopes to meet with theseschools in the coming weeks.Administrators at Johnson and Wales havebeen very receptive, he said, while RISDPresident Roger Mandle has been willingto listen. Igliozzi said he is hoping Brownwill contact him to schedule a meeting,though the University has yet to do so.

    So far, Brown has been a little reluctantto engage, Igliozzi said.

    Mark Nickel, director of the BrownNews Service, said the University has nottaken a position on Igliozzis proposal.

    Brown should be more than happy toparticipate, Igliozzi said. Such an effortwould underscore a larger commitment toimproving educational conditions inProvidence as well as bolstering the cityseconomic growth, he said.

    Mandle told The Herald that RISD hasbeen actively involved in education effortsat Hope for a number of years and hasmet with McWalters to discuss ways toramp up our investment of people to helpsolve the Hope situation.

    But, he said, RISD will probably not

    choose to oversee a charter school.We just are not in a position to take

    over the management of Hope HighSchool in any respect, Mandle said. Wecan be allies, we can be supporters, but wecannot manage any or all of Hope HighSchool.

    Mandle added that he has been intouch with administrators at Brown and atJohnson and Wales concerning Igliozzisplan. He said he believes they share RISDsposition regarding the proposal.

    I know that Brown is already activelyinvolved with Hope in a number of ways,he said. Were all trying to do what wecan.

    Public-private partnerships wouldgreatly benefit the Providence school dis-trict, which currently serves approximate-ly 28,000 students, Igliozzi said.

    It is imperative that these childrensee proper education in order to continuethe financial and economic health of thewhole state of Rhode Island, he said.

    Igliozzi said he agrees with many com-munity leaders who contend that theProvidence School Departments attemptsto address Hopes problems internallyhave not produced satisfactory results.

    F E B R U A R Y 1 , 2 0 0 5

    www.browndailyherald.com

    T U E S D A Y

    195 Angell Street, Providence, Rhode IslandEditorial: 401.351.3372 Business: 401.351.3269 News tips: herald@browndailyherald.com

    TODAY TOMORROW

    mostly sunny36 / 17

    mostly sunny37 / 21

    Ivy Roomclosed untilWednesdayThe Ivy Room, Browns popular vegetar-ian dining option, will be closed untilWednesday.

    A maintenance problem thatrequires workers to drill into the estab-lishments walls is the cause of the tem-porary closure, according to an e-mailforwarded to The Herald by AnnieHatch 06, a supervisor at the Ivy Room.

    Until Wednesday, many students vegetarians included are willing tohold their breaths and perhaps evenventure to the Gate or Josiahs.

    The Ivy Room is a critical part of mylife, said Whitney Snyder 08, a vegetar-ian. But I guess Ill have to find differ-ent options for now.

    Representatives of Brown DiningServices were unwilling to comment onspecific reasons for the closure.

    -Stephen Narain

    Rush extendedto six weeksHouses want more time tomeet prospective membersBY ALEX BARSKSENIOR STAFF WRITER

    Rush period for fraternities and co-edhouses has been extended from five to sixweeks this year to allow prospectivemembers greater flexibility in choosinghousing. Rush began Friday with the firstfraternity party of the semester, at PhiKappa Psi, and will last until March 8,when bids and signed room contracts forfraternity, sorority and program housesare due to the Office of Residential Life.

    We wanted to give people more timeso that they dont feel pressured abouthaving to decide so quickly, said DanielaAmores 05, Greek Council vice chair andmember of Kappa Alpha Theta. Nowthey have more flexibility in choosingwhether to join a house or to enter thehousing lottery with their friends.

    During the rush period each house isallowed to hold five formal events, whichare registered with Greek Council threeon weekdays, which are mandatory non-alcoholic, and two on weekends.

    Greek Council regulates the dates andtimes of these events so they dont overlapand so rushes have the opportunity toattend open houses and parties held byseveral different houses, Amores said.

    I think the extra weeks going to have abeneficial effect because it allows us tospread out rush a bit more. Its usually ahectic month. This takes a lot of pressureoff of everybody, said Maxine Jackson05, president of Zeta Delta Xi, a co-ed fra-ternity.

    It gives us another week to have moreunofficial events at the house, to get toknow the people whove been by quite abit. Itll become more about getting toknow them better, rather than gettingpeople in the door, so that we can make agood decision, she said.

    Jamie Sholem 06, president of Sigma

    see RUSH, page 5

    City councilman wants Hope High split into charter schools

    see HOPE, page 4

    DONT MONKEY AROUNDMichal Zapendowski 07: Whosdumber? Bush or the Radical-LeftBush-bashers?

    O P I N I O N S 7

    SPORTSEXTRA

    Volume CXL, No. 5 An independent newspaper serving the Brown community since 1891

    WINTER SEASON SPECIAL8-PAGE PULL -OUT

    I N S I D E

    Some Class F parties move back to loungesBY STEPHANIE CLARKFEATURES EDITOR

    After the nearly complete removal of ClassF parties from fraternity houses at thebeginning of last semester, more fraterni-ties are taking steps to enforce Universitypolicy and state law more diligently in orderto bring their parties back to WristonQuadrangle.

    The stricter enforcement of fire codes,which began last semester, caused manyClass F parties that were formerly held infraternity house lounges to be moved tocampus spaces such as Sayles Hall or LeungGallery. Better preparation and more dili-gent party management have enabledsome Class F parties to move back intolounge spaces.

    A Class F party is one that serves alcoholand charges admission. These events gen-erally attract more attendees than othertypes of parties.

    While the Universitys policy has notchanged significantly since the beginningof the fall semester, fraternities are findingways to follow the strict occupancy rules intheir smaller lounge spaces. Phi Kappa Psithrew a successful Class F party in SearsHouse Friday night, according to formerpresident and current social chair XanderBoutelle 05.

    By preparing thoroughly, increasingsecurity and keeping a strict head countduring the party, the fraternity was able tothrow an in-house Class F party in accor-dance with all Rhode Island law as well asUniversity policy, Boutelle said. TheDepartment of Public Safety was a big helpin managing the crowd and keeping thingsunder control, he said. In the past, DPS onlycame to fraternity parties in problem situa-tions, whereas officers are now available asa source of support to the fraternity if need-ed, according to Boutelle.

    The primary reason Class F parties weremoved to other campus buildings was a lax-ity in enforcing occupancy limits. Partyattendance cannot legally exceed the post-

    ed occupancy limit at any given time,which is around 125 in most fraternityhouses. When throwing any type of party,Its every houses responsibility to makesure the party is kept at capacity, said ChrisGuhin 05, Greek Council Chair and a mem-ber of Alpha Delta Phi.

    The brothers of Phi Kappa Psi did notmake as much money on Friday night asthey have with previous Class F parties,because they had to turn away a large num-ber of people at the door, Boutelle said. Butit was by far worth it to have (the party) inthe house, even with the lower revenue, hesaid.

    According to Boutelle, as long as stu-dents adopt an energetic and professionalattitude towards throwing parties, they willcontinue to thrive. Fridays party made useof a coatroom so partygoers would not haveto stand outside in the cold while waiting toenter. It is this sort of innovative approachthat will enable Class F parties to remain in

    fraternity houses, Boutelle said.Many fraternity and sorority parties are

    small and invitation-only. Alpha Epsilon Piorganizers usually prefer these to largerClass F parties, said AEPi president RobLazerow. Its more fun for us to throwsmaller parties with our friends, he said.Theyre easier to manage.

    AEPi held its annual Class F party BodyChemistry earlier this year in Sayles Hallfor the first time, a change that necessitatedsome extra planning, Lazerow said.

    The fraternity is planning on having theparty according to schedule next year aswell. If were able to throw it in our build-ing, thats our preference, Lazerow said,but if they are unable to do so, they willrefine planning strategies from this yearand hold it in a campus building again.

    In the meantime, the fraternity will con-tinue to hold invitational parties that dont

    Juliana Wu / Herald

    Fraternities such as Alpha Epsilon Pi continue to throw invitational cocktail parties in their lounge.

    see CLASS F, page 5

    METRO

  • Editorial Phone: 401.351.3372

    Business Phone: 401.351.3260

    Jonathan Ellis, President

    Sara Perkins, Vice President

    Ian Halvorsen, Treasurer

    Daniel Goldberg, Secretary

    The Brown Daily Herald (USPS 067.740) is published Monday through Friday during the aca-

    demic year, excluding vacations, once during Commencement, once during Orientation and

    once in July by The Brown Daily Herald, Inc. POSTMASTER please send corrections to P.O. Box

    2538, Providence, RI 02906. Periodicals postage paid at Providence, R.I. Offices are located at 195

    Angell St., Providence, R.I. E-mail herald@browndailyherald.com. World Wide Web:

    http://www.browndailyherald.com. Subscription prices: $179 one year daily, $139 one semester

    daily. Copyright 2005 by The Brown Daily Herald, Inc. All rights reserved.

    THE BROWN DAILY HERALD, INC.

    C R O S S W O R D

    THIS MORNINGTHE BROWN DAILY HERALD

    TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2005 PAGE 2

    ACROSS1 Imminent7 Sapporo sashes11 Turnpike sight14 Rotary phone

    user15 Farm storage

    area16 Latin I word17 She played 43-

    Across19 Lake maker20 Mountain nymph21 Sushi fish22 __ carotene23 Payment method24 She played 43-

    Across27 Big London

    landmark28 Lee and

    Teasdale29 43-Across

    creator34 More affluent37 Writer __ Rogers

    St. Johns38 Pub spigot40 River past Notre

    Dame41 Most sage43 Show that

    premiered onBroadway in1905

    45 __ salts47 Word before mot

    or vivant48 She played 43-

    Across51 Pool table

    material55 Spills the beans

    (on)56 Abner adjective57 Impish fairy58 Sch. with a

    Providencecampus

    59 She played 43-Across

    62 Put on63 Not new64 Murder on the

    __ Express65 School subj.66 Diversify67 Magnetic

    induction units

    DOWN 1 For a specific

    purpose2 Jeweled crown3 President after

    Grant4 God of Islam5 Requirement6 Arid7 Basketry

    material8 Idol and Joel9 Under the

    weather10 Mayday!11 Academy

    students stint12 Valuable violin13 Neither a friend

    nor acountryman?

    18 Be dead serious22 Stiff drink24 Sea, to Sartre25 Spoil26 Up and about27 Like trombone

    music29 Knockout punch

    target30 1501, to a 13-

    Down31 Attacking

    32 Hebrew alphabetopeners

    33 The Ravenmonogram

    35 Bambis aunt36 Stimpys cartoon

    buddy39 Full of small

    stones42 Rocky peak44 Kind of poodle46 Martin of Route

    66

    48 Not refined49 Slugger Hank50 Lightheaded51 Cannes

    conclusion52 Do very well53 Climbing vine54 Bedouin homes57 Unadulterated59 Popular family

    wheels60 Big-house link61 Com preceder

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    H A M M A T L A S C L O TE Q U I L E E C H R I L EF U L L L E N G T H M O V I ET A L K I N T O Y O Y O S

    N E O L A R KI D T A G L E E R P M SN A R R O W W I D T H S H O ED R A T A A R O N T A B UI N D E P T H A N A L Y S I SA S E R E O S A X E L S

    M I R O W A NA P R O N K I C K S O F FG O O D T I M E C H A R L I EE R L E R O Y C E T E A SS T E M V I S A S A G T S

    By Alan Olschwang(c)2005 Tribune Media Services, Inc. 02/01/05

    02/01/05

    ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:

    xwordeditor@aol.com

    Chocolate Covered Cotton Mark Brinker

    Jero Matt Vascellaro

    Penguiner Haan Lee

    Coreacracy Eddie Ahn

    Homebodies Mirele Davis

    Raw Prawn Kea Johnston

    M E N USHARPE REFECTORY

    LUNCH Fried Fish Sandwich withTartar Sauce, Parslied Rice, FreshVegetable Artichoke Melange,Chocolate Cake with White Frosting,Cherry Tarts, Grilled Chicken Sandwich.

    DINNER Spanish Steak, Sticky Rice,Ginger Sugar Snap Peas & Carrots,Whole Beets, Cheese Biscuit Bread, IceCream Sundae Bar.

    VERNEY-WOOLLEY DINING HALLLUNCH Vegetarian Spinach &Mushroom Soup, Chicken & Rice Soup,Beef Stew, Tomato Quiche, MexicanSuccotash, Cherry Tarts.

    DINNER Vegetarian Spinach &Mushroom Soup, Chicken & Rice Soup,Orange Turkey, Vegan BBQ Tempeh, RicePilaf with Zucchini, Broccoli Cuts, ItalianVegetable Saute, Cheese Biscuit Bread,Chocolate Cake with White Frosting

    W O R L D I N B R I E FAllawi calls for unity,promises inclusion forSunnis

    THE WASHINGTON POST

    BAGHDAD, Iraq A day after Iraqsfirst free election in half a century,interim Prime Minister Ayad Allawicalled on his countrymen to uniteand promised to reach out to thecountrys alienated Sunni Arabminority.

    Perhaps as early as Tuesday, the

    commission will begin releasingresults. But it will take at least 10days to know the entire outcome,said Adil Lami, a top official with theIndependent Electoral Commission.

    Sensing victory, the United IraqiAlliance has attempted to reach outto Sunni leaders in past weeks, butmany Sunnis, in sentiments oftenexpressed bluntly, said they fearedthe alliance would relegate them tosecond-class status and serve as acover for the interests of the Islamicgovernment in predominantlyShiite Iran.

    T O D A Y S E V E N T SSPRING SEMESTER ADDRESS7:30 p.m. (Salomon 101) President Simmons will speak onthe state of the University.

    MOVIE SCREENIING: BLACK IS,BLACK AINT7:00-9:00 p.m. (Smith-Buonano106) Part of Black History Month, spon-sored by the Third World...