The Paddler ezine issue 21 January 2015 sup cover

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The International paddling magazine for recreational paddlers, canoeists, kayakers, stand up paddlers, rafters. Read expedition features on white water, sea kayaking, expedition kayaking, open canoeing, SUP, river running, creeking and recreational paddling. Canoeing magazine, kayaking magazine, SUP magazine, sea kayak magazine, kayak, canoe, watersports, paddles and paddling.

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  • Fighting breast cancerSTANDUPfor the CURE

    KayakPaddlerRegularPaddler SaltyPaddler SUPPaddler CanoePaddler

    ThePaddlerezine.comThePaddlerezine.comInternational digital magazine for recreational paddlersIssue 21 Dec 20

    14

    Adventure part twoCORRANSDusi MARATHON

    By Ian SmithMAGICALfirst WAVES

  • ThePaddler 4

    Juanito de Uguarteremembered

    Marianita, why like this? Juanitos seemingly serious voice made me turn. Afew of us were gathered around a fire on the shore of the Futaleuf river,enjoying a traditional Chilean asado. The Futa community is tightly knit weare all whitewater gypsies from around the world who spend season afterseason on its magical waters, hollering as we go past each other on the river,either guiding rafts, safety kayaking or simply enjoying the whitewater in ourkayaks. Juanito was one of us, and has been for more than a decade. Buthowever much we all shared the love for the mesmerizing waters of theFutaleuf, Juanito would never cease at every opportunity to make us gonorth. Man, there is no place like Peru. If you want to paddle real white water,you have to come to Cusco. The Apurmac is the shiiiit, man! Then he would

    laugh and so would we. That is what Juanito did to the world around him. Hecarried so much happiness and positivity within himself that it was impossibleto not get smitten. He also carried his beautiful homeland in his heart and

    soul, generously sharing the love for his home with all of us.

    Words by Mariann Sther Photos by Seth Ashworth

    Main photo left:Juanito de Uguarte poses for a portrait during the Red Bull First Descent:Michoacan project, in Uruapan, MI, Mexico, on 24 November, 2013

    Photographer: John Rathwell / Red Bull Content Pool

    ThePaddler 5

  • ThePaddler 4

    Juanito de Uguarteremembered

    Marianita, why like this? Juanitos seemingly serious voice made me turn. Afew of us were gathered around a fire on the shore of the Futaleuf river,enjoying a traditional Chilean asado. The Futa community is tightly knit weare all whitewater gypsies from around the world who spend season afterseason on its magical waters, hollering as we go past each other on the river,either guiding rafts, safety kayaking or simply enjoying the whitewater in ourkayaks. Juanito was one of us, and has been for more than a decade. Buthowever much we all shared the love for the mesmerizing waters of theFutaleuf, Juanito would never cease at every opportunity to make us gonorth. Man, there is no place like Peru. If you want to paddle real white water,you have to come to Cusco. The Apurmac is the shiiiit, man! Then he would

    laugh and so would we. That is what Juanito did to the world around him. Hecarried so much happiness and positivity within himself that it was impossibleto not get smitten. He also carried his beautiful homeland in his heart and

    soul, generously sharing the love for his home with all of us.

    Words by Mariann Sther Photos by Seth Ashworth

    Main photo left:Juanito de Uguarte poses for a portrait during the Red Bull First Descent:Michoacan project, in Uruapan, MI, Mexico, on 24 November, 2013

    Photographer: John Rathwell / Red Bull Content Pool

    ThePaddler 5

  • ThePaddler 6

    On this very day some of us had been paddling together on the Futa, others, like Juanito, had shown up for the asado in the evening. Hepaddled down from Cave Camp to join us after work and would be returning to work again early morning byfoot. He would not miss an asado with friends even if he had to solo all the 35 kilometres of whitewater thatFutaleuf consists of and walk the same length back to get to work early next morning. To Juanito this wasnatural he took nobody for granted and was never scared of showing it.

    We had just opened a beer each when his voice caught me off guard. Upon turning around and seeing hismischievous smile, I also started laughing. Si, hermanito, para la Pachamama", I dutifully replied and poured asmall part of my freshly opened beer onto the ground. It was a ritual he introduced me to many years ago,when we were still in our early twenties and after just met on the shores of the Futaleuf.

    He told me there should always be a small sacrifice to the beautiful Mother Earth, to appreciate her love andto show gratitude for what she gives us: life and Juanito was so full of it. He had the ability to walk into aroom or paddle into an eddy and illuminate it with his joy for life, his stoke and charisma. He loved his life,and he loved the path he had chosen to follow.

    ThePaddler 7

  • ThePaddler 6

    On this very day some of us had been paddling together on the Futa, others, like Juanito, had shown up for the asado in the evening. Hepaddled down from Cave Camp to join us after work and would be returning to work again early morning byfoot. He would not miss an asado with friends even if he had to solo all the 35 kilometres of whitewater thatFutaleuf consists of and walk the same length back to get to work early next morning. To Juanito this wasnatural he took nobody for granted and was never scared of showing it.

    We had just opened a beer each when his voice caught me off guard. Upon turning around and seeing hismischievous smile, I also started laughing. Si, hermanito, para la Pachamama", I dutifully replied and poured asmall part of my freshly opened beer onto the ground. It was a ritual he introduced me to many years ago,when we were still in our early twenties and after just met on the shores of the Futaleuf.

    He told me there should always be a small sacrifice to the beautiful Mother Earth, to appreciate her love andto show gratitude for what she gives us: life and Juanito was so full of it. He had the ability to walk into aroom or paddle into an eddy and illuminate it with his joy for life, his stoke and charisma. He loved his life,and he loved the path he had chosen to follow.

    ThePaddler 7

  • ThePaddler 8

    Some years back we were sitting under another starry skybasking in the light from another fire. I was headingout early morning to run the Rio Pascua in southernPatagonia, while he would stay behind to surf anewly discovered wave that he had baptized ElPistola.

    Nothing would make him smile more than surfingthis wave in those days, perfecting his freestylemoves. Just before going to bed Juanito quietlyhanded me a little plastic water-gun. I smiled whileclosing my hand around it, but Juanito was in hisserious mood. It was his lucky talisman and he toldme he always kept it in his lifejacket, My friend, fillthis up with water from the Pascua and it will keep yousafe, so you come back to us.

    As it happened, I took the worst swim of my life onthe Pascua. Upon returning to Juanitos company onthe Futa we shared a bottle of Pisco and celebratedlife and the magic of his lucky water-gun. In manyways this shows the essence of who he was: a deeplyembracing soul with a caring heart for peoplearound him. He was always more worried aboutothers on the river than himself.

    While he always had an immense appetite for lifeand loved being with his family and friends, he wasalso a very driven and dedicated athlete. His pathwas clear and he knew where he wanted to go. Hewanted to become as good as possible and to loveevery step of it. It was not always easy for him totravel out of South America, as visas sometimeswere tricky to obtain for a Peruvian.

    However, after having paddled for years on theFutaleufu with many of the big names from theOttawa Valley in Canada, he finally got a job workingon the Ottawa River two years ago. I remember hismessages were ecstatic during that first season hetruly loved the river and the people he got to paddleand hang out with.

    In later years he had been getting more recognitionfor paddling challenging whitewater with projectslike the Amazon Express project and Red BullsMichoacan project in 2013. Thus this year he becamea fully sponsored athlete and a proud member ofTeam Jackson with Jackson kayaks. His drive to excelin all aspects of kayaking was always inspiring, fromhis slalom competitions around the world in theearly 2000s to big wave freestyle competitions andextreme creek racing.

    ThePaddler 9

    As he himself simply put it, The onlythings that give meaning to my life arethe sports I practice

  • ThePaddler 8

    Some years back we were sitting under another starry skybasking in the light from another fire. I was headingout early morning to run the Rio Pascua in southernPatagonia, while he would stay behind to surf anewly discovered wave that he had baptized ElPistola.

    Nothing would make him smile more than surfingthis wave in those days, perfecting his freestylemoves. Just before going to bed Juanito quietlyhanded me a little plastic water-gun. I smiled whileclosing my hand around it, but Juanito was in hisserious mood. It was his lucky talisman and he toldme he always kept it in his lifejacket, My friend, fillthis up with water from the Pascua and it will keep yousafe, so you come back to us.

    As it happened, I took the worst swim of my life onthe Pascua. Upon returning to Juanitos company onthe Futa we shared a bottle of Pisco and celebratedlife and the magic of his lucky water-gun. In manyways this shows the essence of who he was: a deeplyembracing soul with a caring heart for peoplearound him. He was always more worried aboutothers on the river than himself.

    While he always had an immense appetite for lifeand loved being with his family and friends, he wasalso a very driven and dedicated athlete. His pathwas clear and he knew where he wanted to go. Hewanted to become as good as possible and to loveevery step of it. It was not always easy for him totravel out of South America, as visas sometimeswere tricky to obtain for a Peruvian.

    However, after having paddled for years on theFutaleufu with many of the big names from theOttawa Valley in Canada, he finally got a job workingon the Ottawa River two years ago. I remember hismessages were ecstatic during that first season hetruly loved the river and the people he got to paddleand hang out with.

    In later years he had been getting more recognitionfor paddling challenging whitewater with projectslike the Amazon Express project and Red BullsMichoacan project in 2013. Thus this year he becamea fully sponsored athlete and a proud member ofTeam Jackson with Jackson kayaks. His drive to excelin all aspects of kayaking was always inspiring, fromhis slalom competitions around the world in theearly 2000s to big wave freestyle competitions andextreme creek racing.

    ThePaddler 9

    As he himself simply put it, The onlythings that give meaning to my life arethe sports I practice

  • Grateful to be a paddlerBy Christian Wagley

    As with so many of us working to make theworld a better place, many times its the badthings that drive me to action. Whether itspollution in our local rivers, elected officialswho favour dirty industries, or the globalchallenge of climate change, whats wrong inthe world often evokes the most passion.

    Yet the paddling community is made-up of mostlycaring, kind, and thoughtful people who favour positiveaction. We want good things for our families,communities, and the special places where wepaddle especially actions that protect our favouritewaterways or build community.

    With the holiday season upon us, that makes me thinkof all the good things that I and probably many otherpaddlers are grateful to have in our lives. Im refiningmy own gratitude practice by reminding myself ofhow paddling brings so much good into my life. Afterall, if were out paddling, that means were breathingfresh air, stretching our muscles, and exploring thelarger world.

    Im grateful that I have favourite places to paddle herealong the northern coast of the Gulf of Mexico.Theres an urban waterfront where I can marvel atlarge ships in the port, and explore the ballast stonealong the shoreline left by wooden sailing ships over acentury ago. My favourite remote paddle is along anisolated bay shoreline where pines and palmettosstretch along the shore, seagrass beds are lush, andthrough the clear waters I see an abundance of fish,squid, and other marine life.

    Im grateful for the way that paddling connects mewith other people who care about nature andcommunity. Some of the best people I know areregular paddlers, who find the same connection withnature and relaxation that I seek. We are socialcreatures, and Im grateful that through paddling I havemore good people in my life.

    Im grateful for how briskly paddling my kayak loosensmy shoulders and makes my heart beat fast. I feel theendorphins surging, and my body gets stronger as itslimits are tested.

    Im grateful for how paddling brings me experiencesthat I could never have in any other way. I can quietlyfloat beneath a tree where a bald eagle feasts on afish, and watch a dolphin glide beneath me.

    Im grateful for how paddling is so easy on the waters Ilove. I leave behind nothing but a gentle wake thatquickly fades away.

    Im grateful that time on my kayak simplifies my life. Ina world in which the course of civilization tendstoward more complication, paddling keeps megrounded in the simplicity that I value.

    The holiday season can itself be a source ofcomplication as a frenetic pace and excessive spendingon gifts can detract from the religious and spiritualfocus. Be sure to get out on the water this holidayseason if you can. Whether you do or not, bringgratitude into the season by recognizing and givingthanks for the many wonderful things that paddlingbrings to our lives.

    ThePaddler 12

    Leslie

    Kolovich

    For more information on howyou can participate whereveryou may be on the Planet visitwww.supradioshow.com/wpftp

    Stay tuned for my weeklypodcast of The Paddlers

    Planet with my guest hostChristian Wagley on

    www.supradioshow.com,

    Where we are Standing Upfor the Planet!

    Photo: Joan Vienot

    To advertise email: ads@thepaddlerezine.com or call +44 (0)1480 465081 ThePaddler 13

    The Linville River lies tucked away in the Linville Gorge Wilderness and has long been called The Grand Canyon of the East. The forbidding nature of the terrain has made resource extraction impossible, and for some, like Ty Caldwell, that is a calling like none other. Land only Mother Nature can touch. Who could possibly pass that up?

    Standard Full Cut FlowDistribution: www.systemxeurope.com

  • Grateful to be a paddlerBy Christian Wagley

    As with so many of us working to make theworld a better place, many times its the badthings that drive me to action. Whether itspollution in our local rivers, elected officialswho favour dirty industries, or the globalchallenge of climate change, whats wrong inthe world often evokes the most passion.

    Yet the paddling community is made-up of mostlycaring, kind, and thoughtful people who favour positiveaction. We want good things for our families,communities, and the special places where wepaddle especially actions that protect our favouritewaterways or build community.

    With the holiday season upon us, that makes me thinkof all the good things that I and probably many otherpaddlers are grateful to have in our lives. Im refiningmy own gratitude...