The Call Is Places - Guthrie Theater Mel Brooks¢â‚¬â„¢ parody Young Frankenstein pays homage to the 1931

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  • The Call Is Places

    Frankenstein – Playing with Fire Sept 15 – Oct 27

    2018–2019 SUBSCRIBER NEWSLETTER

    Wurtele Thrust Stage

  • WELCOME

    The idea for Frankenstein came to 18-year-old Mary Shelley in a dream. After reading a volume of ghost stories with Percy Shelley and Lord Byron and attempting to pen ghastly tales of their own, Mary awoke one night from a chilling vision of a scientist bringing a “hideous phantasm of a man” to life. That striking image was the impetus for her novel, which was published in 1818 and kept alive through stage and film adaptations for the past 200 years.

    But her ghost-story-turned-cultural-phenomenon isn’t the only notable anniversary. We’re also heralding the 30th anniversary of Barbara Field’s haunting Frankenstein – Playing with Fire script. This brilliant adaptation was commissioned by the Guthrie under the artistic direction of the late Garland Wright and opened in July 1988 following a five-month national tour. Barbara’s work and artistry are woven into the fabric of the Guthrie’s history, and I’m thrilled to once again examine the questions Mary Shelley raised two centuries ago.

    The riveting and deeply personal catechism between Frankenstein and his Creature draws us in from the first question — “Do you dream?” — and never lets us go. What follows is an examination of the ethical limits of science and an intense grappling with the age-old quandary: Just because we can do something, does it mean we should?

    Thank you for joining us at the top of the 2018–2019 Season — our 56th and counting. I hope you enjoy the show and return to experience more incredible stories on our stages.

    Yours,

    From Artistic Director Joseph Haj

    Dear Friends,Frankenstein – Playing with Fire Sept 15 – Oct 27, 2018 Wurtele Thrust Stage

    Noises Off Oct 27 – Dec 16, 2018

    McGuire Proscenium Stage

    A Christmas Carol Nov 13 – Dec 29, 2018 Wurtele Thrust Stage

    The Great Leap Jan 12 – Feb 10, 2019

    McGuire Proscenium Stage

    As You Like It Feb 9 – March 17, 2019 Wurtele Thrust Stage

    Cyrano de Bergerac

    March 16 – May 5, 2019 McGuire Proscenium Stage

    Metamorphoses April 13 – May 19, 2019 Wurtele Thrust Stage

    Guys and Dolls June 22 – Aug 25, 2019

    Wurtele Thrust Stage

    Floyd’s July 27 – Aug 25, 2019

    McGuire Proscenium Stage

    Visit guthrietheater.org for additional productions and

    play descriptions.

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    SE A

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    PHOTO: JOSEPH HAJ (KERI PICKETT) 2 \ GUTHRIE THEATER

  • CREATURE

    VICTOR

    KREMPE/OLD MAN

    FRANKENSTEIN

    ELIZABETH

    ADAM

    DIRECTOR

    SCENIC DESIGNER

    COSTUME DESIGNER

    LIGHTING DESIGNER

    SOUND DESIGNER/COMPOSER

    DRAMATURG

    RESIDENT VOICE COACH

    MOVEMENT DIRECTORS

    FIGHT DIRECTOR

    INTIMACY CONSULTANT

    STAGE MANAGERS

    ASSISTANT STAGE MANAGER

    ASSISTANT DIRECTOR

    NYC CASTING CONSULTANT

    DESIGN ASSISTANTS

    Elijah Alexander*

    Ryan Colbert*

    Robert Dorfman*

    Zachary Fine*

    Amelia Pedlow*

    Jason Rojas*

    Rob Melrose

    Michael Locher

    Raquel Barreto

    Cat Tate Starmer

    Cliff Caruthers

    Carla Steen

    Jill Walmsley Zager

    Jonathan Beller Beth Brooks

    Aaron Preusse

    Lauren Keating

    Chris A. Code* Jamie J. Kranz*

    Jane E. Heer*

    Tracey Maloney*

    McCorkle Casting, Ltd.

    Ryan Connealy (lighting) Lisa Jones (costumes) Reid Rejsa (sound)

    Frankenstein – Playing with Fire by Barbara Field (from the novel

    by Mary Shelley)

    Creative Team

    *Member of Actors’ Equity Association

    Cast in alphabetical order

    The Guthrie gratefully recognizes Steve Thompson & Ron Frey and Kendrick B. Melrose as Executive Producers; Patricia & Peter Kitchak and Louise W. Otten as Producers; and Tyrone & Delia Bujold as Associate Producers.

    Setting The North Pole and various stops in a voyage of memory. It is the summer solstice — the last day or the first day, depending on the point of view.

    Run Time Approximately 2 hours, 10 minutes with one intermission.

    Understudies China Brickey (Elizabeth), John Catron* (Victor/Adam), Steven Epp* (Frankenstein/Krempe/Old Man), Jason Rojas* (Creature)

    Understudies never substitute for performers unless announced prior to the performance.

    Acknowledgments Commissioned and originally produced by the Guthrie Theater and presented by special arrangement with Dramatists Play Service, Inc., New York.

    Barbara Field wishes to acknowledge the dramaturgical expertise of Michael Lupu, whose assistance was invaluable when the play was written 30 years ago.

    Delta Air Lines is the official airline of the Guthrie Theater.

    3 \ GUTHRIE THEATER

  • THE PLAY

    At the North Pole during the summer solstice, Frankenstein and his Creature meet after a years-long chase. Frankenstein wants to avenge the destruction of his family; the Creature wants to avenge his abandonment. Their temporary and wary truce takes the form of a question-and-answer catechism that encompasses topics people have wrestled with since God created Adam. As Frankenstein marvels at the achievements of his creation and the Creature demands answers from his creator, memories from their disparate pasts are conjured and entwined.

    A young, ambitious Victor pursues knowledge and pushes the boundaries of science, ultimately creating and giving life to his Adam, whom he immediately rejects as a monster. Adam doesn’t know what it means to be a monster, but his painful education among humanity soon teaches him. Even though he is an outcast, he has an unbreakable connection to Victor that will forever test the bounds of love, responsibility, life and death.

    Synopsis

    CHARACTERS

    Frankenstein, a scientist

    Creature, Frankenstein’s creation

    Victor, a memory of Frankenstein as a young man

    Adam, a memory of the newly made Creature

    Elizabeth, Victor’s betrothed

    Krempe, Victor’s professor at Ingolstadt

    Old Man, a memory from the Creature’s past

    “If an astonishing power were suddenly placed in your hands, what would you do with it?”

    – Victor to Krempe in Frankenstein – Playing with Fire

    PHOTO: SCENIC DESIGN SKETCH BY MICHAEL LOCHER 4 \ GUTHRIE THEATER

  • THE WRITERS

    Novelist Mary Shelley The only daughter of writers William Godwin and Mary Wollstonecraft, Mary Shelley was born in London on August 30, 1797. She married poet Percy Bysshe Shelley in 1816. Two years later, she anonymously published her most famous novel, Frankenstein. After her husband’s death in 1822, Shelley devoted herself to publicizing his writing, including Posthumous Poems (1824), Poetical Works (1839) and his prose works.

    In addition to Frankenstein, Shelley wrote six other novels, including Matilda (1959), Valperga (1823), The Fortunes of Perkin Warbeck (1830), Lodore (1835) and Falkner (1837), as well as a novella, mythological dramas, stories and articles, various travel books and biographical studies. The Last Man (1826), an account of the future destruction of the human race by a plague, is often considered her best work. History of a Six Weeks’ Tour (1817) recounts the continental tour she and Percy took in 1814 following their elopement and summer spent near Geneva in 1816.

    In 1848, she began to suffer the first symptoms of a brain tumor. She died in London on February 1, 1851, having asked to be buried with her mother and father. Her son and daughter- in-law had Shelley’s parents’ bodies exhumed and buried them together in the churchyard of St. Peter’s Bournemouth in England.

    Playwright Barbara Field Barbara Field has created work that has been seen across the United States, Canada and Europe. She served as playwright- in-residence at the Guthrie Theater from 1974 to 1981 and crafted a number of pieces, including translations and adaptations.

    Novel adaptations for the Guthrie include Camille by Alexandre Dumas and Frankenstein – Playing with Fire, a response to Mary Shelley’s novel. An adaptation of Great Expectations commissioned by the Seattle Children’s Theatre later played at the Guthrie and traveled the country on an eight-month tour. A revival of Great Expectations won a Los Angeles Drama Critics Circle Award. Her adaptation of A Christmas Carol has been part of theater seasons for the Guthrie, Actors Theatre of Louisville and Kansas City Repertory Theatre.

    Field is a founding member of the Playwrights’ Center in Minneapolis, and a book of seven of her plays, New Classics from the Guthrie Theater, was published in 2003 by Smith & Kraus. She is also the author of two anthologies: Collected Plays, Volume One (2008) and Collected Plays, Volume Two (2014).

    “ I busied myself to think of a story … One which would speak to the mysterious fears of our nature and awaken thrilling horror — one to make the reader dread to look round, to curdle the blood and quicken the beatings of the heart. If I did not accomplish these things, my ghost story would be unworthy of its name.”

    – Mary Shelley, on her hopes for writing the ghost story that would become Frankenstein

    “ When [former Guthrie Artistic Director] Garland Wright asked me to create this adapta