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February 26, 2014 edition of the Sooke News Mirror

Text of Sooke News Mirror, February 26, 2014

  • C O M M U N I T Y N E W S M E D I A

    Black PressWednesday, February 26, 2014Agreement#40110541

    NEWSM I R R O R

    Editorial Page 8

    Entertainment Page 11

    Sports/stats Page 24

    APPETITE FOR ART

    Art and food paired for charity

    Page 11

    SOOKE

    7x2.5oliver katz

    3.125x1.2Dimock

    Classifieds 21 75

    Britt Santowski photo

    Snow Day!Emily (left) and Ella were out first thing on Saturday morning to build a snowman. Snow stuck in the higher elevations and caused havoc in some areas throughout the weekend and into Monday. Normal seasonal temperatures are expected by mid week.

    Boat launch issues back before councilPirjo RaitsSooke News Mirror

    Its back to the draw-ing board as far as oper-ation of the boat launch is concerned.

    At District of Sooke council on February 24, council decided not to act on the recommen-dations put forth by staff to install a multi-use pay station at the public boat launch at the Prestige hotel. Council instead chose to rehash the issue and hold more public meet-ings and revisit Request for Proposals.

    Currently there is a honour system in place at the boat launch and no enforcement. The neighbour collects the $10 fee from the lock box and submits a per-centage to the district.

    Purchasing a machine would cost $9,500, leasing $2,040/year and renting $3,000/year.

    Councillor Kevin Pearson stated that rushing into purchas-ing a machine was the wrong way to go. He also said they could talk for another year and fumble our way through another fishing season.

    Im not in favour of another RFP, said Pear-son.

    Planner Gerard LeB-

    lanc stated council had rejected two proposals at a October 13, 2013 meeting. At the regular council meeting on Oct. 13 council voted not to spend any more money on the boat launch, specifically for items such as concrete stairs, a fish washing station and an ancillary build-ing.

    Councillor Herb Hal-dane questioned where the February 24, 2014 staff recommendations came from and where was it decided to look at a multi-use pay station.

    If it was done, it was done in a lunchroom, said Haldane.

    The biggest issue, apart from who pays for launching and who doesnt, is parking. Hal-dane stated one of the proponents had park-ing across the street while the district did not have a solution.

    Apparently, the prop-erty in question is not zoned for parking.

    Haldane suggested a zoning amendment.

    Fishermen truly believe it is theirs and they think they have some sort of first rights, said Haldane.

    Councillor Maja Tait said it bothered her to have to charge for launching as federal tax dollars were used to build the boat launch.

    Discussion ensued on an annual fee for Sooke residents.

    Terrance Martin came forward at the public portion of the meeting and stated he was the principle behind one of the RFP submissions. He said it was a mystery why the staff recommenda-tion did not address the running of the boat launch.

    One of the RFP sub-missions would have seen the boat launch operated at a cost of $30,000/year. These proposal were looked at in-camera and were not public information at this point.

    Council agreed that parking and boat launch fees were two separate issues and they had no solution for the parking issue.

    Acting Mayor Rick Kasper said it was time to get off the merry-go-round and it was time for a proper business plan for the boat lau-anch.

    It was clearly stated there would be a boat launch fee, said Kasper. I hope we can come to a decision at little or no cost to the taxpayer.

    Public input will be a necessary ingredient to any decision made by council.

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  • 2 www.sookenewsmirror.com WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2014 - SOOKE NEWS MIRROR2 www.sookenewsmirror.com Wednesday, February 26, 2014 - SOOKE NEWS MIRROR

    MOOCs 101Britt SantowskiSooke News Mirror

    Did you hear? You can now take free

    courses from universi-ties like UBC, Toronto, and even Harvard through this crazy new thing called MOOCs (pronounced very much like a cows calls, ending with a hard-c). MOOCs stands for Massive Open Online Courses.

    And, no, theres no take-this-free-intro-course-and-pay-out-of-the-nose-for-the-real-content-afterwards nonsense. Its straight up learning. For those with the drive and the stamina to do it on their own.

    The common thread for these courses is that they are open aka free. As with any-thing online, everything thrown against the wall (or the screen) is exper-imental. Until some-thing sticks.

    Currently, there are for-profit MOOC pro-viders (like Coursera at coursera.org) and private providers (like ALISON at alison.com). The for-profit business model is based on fund-ing revenue through certification. Proctored exams. Which is a fancy name for monitored exams, where the stu-dent pays for the final certification. But ulti-mately, the courses are free.

    Non-profit providers like edX (edx.org) and MIT OpenCourseWare (ocw.mit.edu) offer online university-level courses at no charge.

    The footer at the edX site sums up their offer-ings nicely.

    EdX offers inter-active online classes and MOOCs from the worlds best universi-ties. Online courses from MITx, HarvardX, BerkeleyX, UTx and many other universi-ties. Topics include biology, business, chemistry, computer science, econom-ics, finance, electron-

    ics, engineering, food and nutrition, history, humanities, law, litera-ture, math, medicine, music, philosophy, physics, science, statis-tics and more. EdX is a non-profit online initia-tive created by found-ing partners Harvard and MIT.

    The open courseware programs are more self-guided. Depending on the course, online resources can include a syllabus, list of read-ings, assignments, exams and video lec-tures. As quoted on their About page, Pro-fessor Dick K.P. Yue, (MIT School of Engi-neering) writes, The idea is simple: to pub-lish all of our course materials online and make them widely

    available to everyone.Interested in aero-

    nautics and astronau-tics? Unified Engineer-ing anyone? Youll find it online at MIT.

    According to the Wall Street Journal (An Early Report Card on Massive Open Online Courses, Oct 8, 2013), the largest MOOC pro-vider has attracted five million students, and nonprofit provider edX had over 1.3 million stu-dents.

    The biggest chal-lenge seems to be course completion. The same WSJ article says that theres a 90 per cent drop-out rate. A more recent article from Bloomberg puts the drop-out rate at a staggering 95 percent (Harvard, MIT Online

    Courses Dropped by 95% of Registrants, by John Lauerman Jan 21, 2014).

    Bottom line here is that if you consider yourself to be one of the few who stands above (or beside or out-side of) the crowd, and if you are interested in expanding your cur-rent knowledge set, the tools are there for those who want.

    Were in the middle (or perhaps the begin-ning) of a paradigm shift here. There are whisperings of having people meet a mini-mum criteria, like a GPA or pre-requisites. If you want to help shape this year-old phenomenon, maybe its time to jump in, feet first with full gusto while its still free.

    Learning for the sake of knowledge

    Britt Santowski photo

    Good eatsMembers of the Sooke Fall Fair Society fill the need for munchies at Seedy Saturday at the Sooke Community Hall on Saturday.

    Join us March 1st for this community event!

    Festivities include official ribbon cutting,

    food and music.

    Plus, you can take a tour of the new Juan de Fuca

    Local Area Services Building!

    The official opening of the Juan de Fuca Local Area Services Building

    takes place March 1st, 2014 from noon until 2 pm.

    This community event takes place at #3 7450 Butler Road, off Otter Point Road

    in the Sooke Business Park.www.crd.bc.ca/jdf

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  • SOOKE NEWS MIRROR - Wednesday, February 26, 2014 www.sookenewsmirror.com 3

    Did You Know? Royal LePage Coast Capital

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    This is a great website that has almost all of our Royal LePage listings, and is very user friendly. Along with this website there will be a monthly magazine style insert in all the local newspapers like the Sooke News Mirror. This insert will have a circulation of 90,000+ and will be distributed from Sooke to Sidney. This is another great tool when trying to sell your house in this complex Real Estate Market.

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    SOOKE NEWS MIRROR - Wednesday, February 26, 2014 www.sookenewsmirror.com 3

    Britt SantowskiSooke News Mirror

    On Thursday, Feb 20, after entering a guilty plea, Catherine Gaye Park of Sooke, was sen-tenced under the Pre-vention of Cruelty of Animals Act, after the SPCA removed some dead cats from her home in May, 2013.

    Parks case, accord-ing to sentencing judge, Honourable Judge Smith, points out how fragile we all are. He gave her a suspended sentence that included two years probation, 40 hours of commu-nity service to be com-pleted in six months, and a five year prohibi-tion on owning any cats and dogs. A suspended sentence means if she does not comply with her sentence, it can be re-addressed by the courts.

    Her story includes a collision of mental health issues, stress-ful life events and increased poverty, which resulted in her killing some of the cats that were in her care, on May 13, 2013. In December, following a BC SPCA investiga-tion, Park was charged under the Prevention of Cruelty of Animals Act.

    After attending court to hear the charges on Jan 9, Park was given six weeks to seek legal council, and was required to return to court on Feb 20 to enter a plea. According to Parks testimony in court, her request for Legal Aid was denied.

    Standing before the judge just after 2 p.m. on Feb 20, Park listened as Crown Counsel S. Salmond reviewed the case against her.

    In presenting the Crowns argument to the judge, Salmond said Park had killed

    several cats on the night in question. He noted she had a large number of cats in her care (over 30), that she was having difficulty in dealing with the ani-mals, and she was not having luck in getting help. At 11 p.m. on May 13, 2013, Parks friend Brad Davies had filed a report with the RCMP, saying Park had gone crazy and was killing cats.

    Continuing his nar-rative, Salmond noted Davies was concerned about Park, as Park told him she had wanted to hurt herself but didnt know how to do it. Davies described Park as a cat rescue lady to the RCMP, and stated what she had done was out of character. Davies speculated she was off her medication, and noted she was drink-ing again after 13 dry years.

    When the RCMP arrived on site, they asked Park how many cats she had killed, to which she replied seven. The RCMP took Park to the Royal Jubi-lee Hospital in Victoria, where she stayed for several days.

    The description pro-vided by Davies was heavily considered by Crown Counsel.

    From there, Park picked up the story.

    Unrepresented, Park stood before the judge. With shaking hands and a voice that some-times wavered, she told the judge her story.

    Park said she had been struggling emo-tionally since the death of her father in April 2012. Her moth-ers dementia had also become more severe. Where her parents had historically helped out with the financing of her animals, the addi-tional funding ceased.

    In early May, Park was not able to afford a trip to visit her mother and because of a lack of funds, Park also stopped taking her medication, medica-tion that assists her with her mental health issues. She considered this an opportunity to wean herself off the drugs.

    Park also deals with a high sensitivity to loud noises, and on the after-noon of the day in ques-tion, after several days off her medication, the sounds became over-whelming. Her dog was barking, the cats were scratching on the screen door, and the phone was ringing incessantly (Park said her mother rang her 17 - 18 times). Park called the SPCA, saying she needed to get rid of her animals to avoid cru-elty charges. She was asking for help, and she knew she was starting to break down.

    At 5 p.m., Park said she called Davies and asked him to bring a pack of cigarettes and a bottle of cider. Then, said Park, she snapped. She started killing the animals.

    She had since sur-rendered all of her remaining domestic pets, including a dog,

    16 indoor cats, and six feral cats. She is on social assistance, and is working with her doc-tor to ensure that her prescription is proper, and to apply for disabil-ity.

    She admitted to being ashamed of what she had done, and says she re-thinks it every day. She also said she is no longer drinking.

    In considering his sentence, Judge Smith acknowledged how Park came to her frag-ile state and how her turning away from her meds and turning towards alcohol all con-tributed to her growing fragility.

    Everything became distorted to you, and you were a very unhealthy person, Judge Smith said. In considering her sen-tence, he was mind-ful of the fact that she acknowledged what she did was wrong, and she fully cooperated with the authorities.

    Besides the sus-pended sentence, Park is to refrain from taking alcohol or uncontrolled substances, and to attend any counselling that is recommended by her probation offi-cer.

    OPEN HOUSE FOR JDF SERVICE BUILDING

    BLUEGRASS MUSIC, hot dogs, Stick coffee and great speeches will all be available on Saturday, March 1 for the grand opening of the Juan de Fuca Services building off on Butler Road. Area director Mike hIcks invites everyone out to tour the new building.

    opEnInG tAkES pLACE beginning at 12 noon.

    AS GEoRGE BUSh would say, MIssion accomplished, said hicks.

    ITS COMING!thE AnnUAL RotARY

    CLUB AUCtIon AnD SpRInG FAIR,on May 3. Seeking booth exhibitors. Call 250-588-1393 or email: [email protected] or check out the web site at: www.sookerotary.com/auction.

    PINk SHIRT Day

    WEAR A pInk shirt today to show you support for anti-bullying campaigns.

    UpSooke

    Thumbs Up

    Park given suspended sentence Police beatattempted robbery

    Early Monday morning the police were called to Village Food Markets to respond to an attempted robbery. A 15-year-old lone male went into the grocery store and, wielding a hatchet, demanded cash. When the cashier asked him to reiterate, the male hit the cash register with the hatchet and left the building without any money. He was followed by staff who kept a safe distance. After getting rid of the hatchet by throwing it into the window of another office building within minutes of leaving Village Market, the young man was arrested and charged with robbery, mischief and possession of a weapon. He is known to police. Staff Sargent Steve Wright emphasized that crimes like this are very rare to Sooke.

    On the evening of Friday, Feb. 21 at around 5:45, three people were being followed on the board walk and contacted the police. Three people, including a 20-year-old from Sidney, were arrested following a pursuit using police dogs. That person is still being held in custody. The other two, one from Sidney and another from Saanich, were also charged and released on a Promise to Appear. Drugs and alcohol were involved.

    One-stop recycling depotResidents of Sooke

    will now have a trans-fer station which will accept all types of recy-clables, garbage, appli-ances, wood and metal scraps.

    Dale Arden is open-ing a recycling transfer station at the site of the old mill on Idlemore Road.

    The town has been screaming for an acces-sible transfer station, said Mike Hicks.

    I saw the need for

    it and I have the prop-erty to do it and all the equipment we need, said Arden. Arden also said the large site is accessible and will be kept tidy.

    The transfer station, across from the Sooke Bottle Depot, will be open on Saturday, March 1.

    Its competitive (price-wise) to any recycling company in North America, said Arden.

    to ALL oF our Canadian athletes who showed incredible sportsmanship during the Sochi olympics. We couldnt be prouder and more honoured to have you represent Canada.

  • 4 www.sookenewsmirror.com Wednesday, February 26, 2014 - SOOKE NEWS MIRROR

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    B.C. Transit Bus Passes, Lottery Centre, Gift Certificates and Canada Postage Stamps We reserve the right to limit quantities Proud member of Sooke Region Chamber of Commerce

    Village Food Markets

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    Black Forest

    Ham .........................................$129

    Bakery Counter

    Apple Pies8" ...................................................

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    Grape Juice341 ml ..................99

    Libert

    GreekYogurt4 pack ............................2/500

    SilkTrue Almond or SoyBeverage1.89L ...........................399

    California Large

    Navel Oranges 1.72/kg ...................78

    Royal City

    CannedVegetables341-398 ml .............89Dare

    BreaktimeCookies250g .........................99Kraft Shake 'n Bake

    CoatingMix113-192g .............

    2/400

    Dole 100% Juice or

    DoleSparklers12 pack ......................499Dempster'sCanadian Century or Multigrain

    Bread600g..........................299

    Heinz

    TomatoPaste156 ml ....................

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    Mac & CheeseDinners150-200g .......................99Wild RootsCoastal Berry Blend

    Trail Mix737g ...........................899

    Quaker Life or Corn Bran

    Cereal425-455g .....................299

    Seafood

    Salad......................................................................................$109Regular or Roasted Garlic

    Hummus .............................................................................$119

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    Potato Patties 1.36 kg .............399Green Giant Simply Steam

    Vegetables 200-250g ............2/300

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    Parmesan Cheese 170g .......299Bailey's

    Coffee Creamer 400 ml .......2/500

    Dairyland

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    Cream 500ml ................................189

    Kashi

    Bars 160-210g ............................2/500Sun ower Kitchen

    Hummus 227g ............................2/500

    Heinz Smart Ones

    Entrees 170-311g ......................2/400Wong Wing assorted

    Asian Side Dishes 400-500g 2/700

    Mexi Snax All-Natural

    Tortilla Chips 225g ..............2/400Blue Monkey

    Coconut Water 520 ml ........2/400

    Summit Carrot, Silk Tru e, Fudge or Cerman Chocolate

    Layered Cakes 6" ........................................ $799Made from Scratch Homestyle White or Brown

    Bread 680g .............................................................. $199Montreal Beef ............................................$169

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    Peanut Butter

    Cookies 12 Pk ....................................................$399

    Cinnamon Scones 6 Pk .....................$369

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    Romaine Lettuce ..............$100Organic!

    Cauli ower ..........................$200Organic!

    Yellow Onions 3lb bag ......$300

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    $6.57/kg ......................298Organic!

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    Sole Fillets ...................$132Fresh

    Oyster Tubs 8 oz .............$499

    Salted or UnsaltedRed Skin Peanuts ............................59NaturalSnack Mix ........................................59400g TubCranergy Mix ...................................$379

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    Bacon 500g ...............................................$499Simply Poultry Frozen Cordon Swiss or Broccoli & Cheese

    Stuffed Chicken 984g .................$299

    Alberta Beef AAATop SirloinGrilling Steaks$11.00/kg ......................$499Fresh with Back Portion

    Chicken Legs $4.39/kg ...................$199Maple Leaf Natural Selections

    Deli Meats 175g ..................................$399Simply Poultry Frozen Strips Nuggets or Burgers

    Breaded Chicken 907g ..............$499

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    Congratulations!to all of our fabulous athletes

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  • SOOKE NEWS MIRROR - Wednesday, February 26, 2014 www.sookenewsmirror.com 5SOOKE NEWS MIRROR - Wednesday, February 26, 2014 www.sookenewsmirror.com 5

    One of the last recruits into the BC Provincial Police before that venerable force was taken over by the RCMP in 1950, Lew Dempsey finished his distinguished career as an Inspector in the Nelson Subdivision in 1985.

    In July 1993, when our new RCMP Detach-ment building was opened on Church Road under the tenure of Sergeant Wayne Wat-son, Lew and his wife Ioline were among the special guests from afar that gathered together to share reminiscences. While the official cer-emonies took place at the detachment in the afternoon, in the eve-ning the Sooke Com-munity Association hosted a salmon barbe-cue picnic at the Flats in true Sooke fashion. The camaraderie as members - retired and

    serving - shared tales around the campfire, was an event we may never see again.

    Exemplifying the community feeling of policing in Sookes bygone days, the after-noons refreshments had been prepared by Sooke Womens Institute, led by Flora Pinder and Sybil Ban-ner, while the gift of a collage portraying all detachment command-ers in the areas history

    was presented by the Sooke Festival Society.

    When Lew Dempsey was posted here as a Corporal in 1961, he was the lone force, his territory extend-ing from the Colwood/Metchosin border, west to the San Juan valley. It would be more cor-rect to say that Lew and Ioline both served. The couple and their two sons lived at Sookes first police station at Sooke Road and Dren-nan; Ioline looked after the office, took the calls and fed the prisoners. Dick Herrling recalled the Detachment con-sisted of one policeman who very soon earned the respect of the whole community with his fine police work.

    It was a shared sense of responsibility, per-haps bred into the gen-eration that had grown up in the Depression years, that had Lew

    and Ioline working so closely together, and also dedicated to their family time. I recall one sunny winter Sunday, my family going up to skate on Sheilds Lake, and running into the Dempseys who were roasting wieners with their boys in the beau-tiful winter setting. I recall Ioline telling me how she could not relax when Lew was out on call at night, and how she would take a blanket and lie on the kitchen floor to wait for him to come home safely.

    When the Dempseys left Sooke in September 1967, the detachment had grown to three, and he had been promoted to Sergeant. In retire-ment after Nelson, the Dempseys lived at Bal-four and then Castlegar.

    Sookes Lorne Chris-tensen, a dedicated police historian, said, I

    first met Lew through a phone call while I was building a police exhibit at the museum in 2008. He was extremely help-ful with information and artifacts. I enjoyed talking to him so much that I never missed an opportunity to call him back. In 2010 while in the Kootenays, I vis-ited him and found him to be exactly what I expected, a real gentle-man, a wonderful host and I came away know-ing he must have been an awesome police offi-cer.

    Together as they had been throughout their lives, so they were at the end. When Lew passed away last Thursday, it was only hours later that Ioline went to join him.

    Elida Peers, Histo-rian

    Sooke Region Museum

    A bit of policing history in Sooke

    SRHS photo

    Lew Dempsey

    Setting the record straight on remunerationPirjo Raits Sooke News Mirror

    In last weeks front page story (Volunteer fire fighters to be awarded with small sti-pend) there was some misun-derstanding as to what kind of compensation the firefighters received.

    What was not made clear at the meeting and in the article is that the volunteer firefight-ers do not currently receive a stipend and the numbers quoted as $8,500 for train-ing and $6,500 for fire-related calls were from a proposal put forth by the Sooke Firefighters Association to the District of Sooke.

    It was a projection, said Ben Temple of the SFFA, we would like to see compensa-

    tion like this.He said council had rejected

    that proposal. That is when council came up with the pro-posal to put $25,000 into the 2014 budget for honorariums for volunteer firefighters.

    The volunteer firefight-ers received $116,784 in 2013 which includes remuneration for duty officers ($24,786) first response duty crews($24,786) and relief workers wages/remuneration ($15,606).

    Duty officers are paid when there are no career firefighters on duty, for the hours between 6 p.m. and 7 a.m.

    This is in order to guaran-tee a response in the middle of the night, said Temple. He explained that they work on four-day shifts and get com-pensated for being available.

    Volunteer firefighters are not paid when they respond to a call out.

    We also have a two-man duty crew from 10 p.m. to 5 a.m. for calls that are not a major emergency, said Tem-ple. Those are paid shifts, those individuals are working to guarantee a minimum level of staffing.

    Support service volunteers do not attack fires but they do provide some essential ser-vices to the fire crews.

    They do things that need to be done, explained Tem-ple.

    Acting Mayor Rick Kasper stated the remuneration for relief worker wages would rise to $30,000 in 2014. The five-year financial plan shows this figure to rise to $60,778

    by 2018.Volunteer firefighters

    receive training and basic uniforms at no cost to them-selves. They are not compen-sated for items such as gas, lost wages or other out of pocket expenses.

    The annual contract pay-ment to the Volunteer Fire-fighters Association has gone from $30,000 Dec 31, 2011 to $37,038. Jan 1, 2014, and vol-unteer firefighters control those funds, stated Kasper via email. A base amount of $500 will be available for any volunteer firefighter who attends 66 hrs of train-ing which includes attending practices and other hands on learning events starting this year.

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  • 6 www.sookenewsmirror.com WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2014 - SOOKE NEWS MIRROR

    Pirjo RaitsSooke News Mirror

    Official Community Plans are written to be the vision of a commu-nity. They present a long tern vision, estab-lish goals and objec-tives and reflect a com-munitys values. Its the foundation on which planning and develop-ment rely.

    Otter Points Offi-cial Community Plan is something just a little different. While it con-tains all of the usual bylaws, zonings and policies, it also con-tains an addendum comprised of the his-tory of Otter Point.

    Arnie Campbell said when they first began reviewing the OCP, they found the history to be out of date and Juan de Fuca planner June Klassen approached Campbell about taking on the project of updat-ing the history. Camp-bell, is the former presi-dent of the Otter Point and Shirley Resident Ratepayers Association (OPSRRA). He enlisted the help of Elida Peers

    and they began the two year journey.

    They put their heads together and started compiling the history of the area and in the process they discov-ered little bits of his-tory they didnt know existed.

    They talked to people who still remembered the region in their life-time and as a result a impressive booklet emerged. They scoured the archives at the Sooke Region Museum and they researched facts and fiction.

    They either cor-rected wrong informa-tion or gave us new stuff the museum was unaware of, said Campbell.

    Did you know that the St. Rose of Lima Catholic Church isnt the first Catholic church in the area? asked Campbell.

    There was a St. Xavier Catholic Church on the corner of Kemp Lake and Otter Point Roads, kitty-corner to the present firehall. It was there in the 1960s but it never lasted more

    than a decade.As the logging indus-

    try faded, so did the need for a church. It became a teacherage and then a private resi-dence.

    There was a horse race track on the Poirier Ranch and they found a map from 1894 showing its location.

    The man who Kemp Lake is named after was a squatter on Crown land and there was a railway that ran from Tugwell Road to Robinson Road then to Poirier Lake onwards to DeMamiel Creek before it ended at the Sooke River. The railway hauled logs to Cooper Cove.

    They also found a company drilled for oil at Muir Creek. They went down 1,200 feet without discovering any crude.

    And then there are the accounts of Emily Carr...

    Those are just some of the stories and bits of history included in the booklet. The book-let will be presented to those who contributed

    to it at a small private reception on February 26.

    It took two years to complete and it is not a document which will sit on the shelf gather-ing dust. It is meant to be a document that can be reopened and added to and will be part of the OCP.

    Arnie Campbell has written and edited the OPSRRA newsletter for many years and he will now be handing over the task to Marika Naga-saka. Hell continue to be involved in smaller

    and smaller ways as he eases himself into some kind of retirement.

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  • Britt SantowskiSooke News Mirror

    If youve driven along East Sooke Road recently you might have seen some land clearing and a sign reading: Site of the new East Sooke Fire Hall. A new fire hall is getting underway, and targeted operational date is in early 2015. The new re hall will be located on East Sooke Road, east of Raglan Place.

    This fire hall has been long in the mak-ing. There have been ongoing efforts from successive fire commis-sioners to replace the existing fire hall, but the necessary condi-tions came together in 2013 to make the dream a reality. Some of these conditions included the sale of land, which Brian White of the East Sooke Fire Commission said came at a very satisfactory price. An anonymous $40,000 donation moved things along nicely as well. White said many in the community also stepped up, reflect-ing a real community effort. Former Juan de Fuca area director Brian Henson contrib-uted land clearing and Ramsay Milne helped with the burning of the brush and shrub. The CRD has also provided significant support.

    According to White, the impetus behind this fast action came last spring, when an inspec-tor from the Fire Under-writers Survey (FUS) came to the East Sooke Fire Hall and asked why they still operate from a fire hall that was inade-quate way back in1994.

    A CRD document dated February 2013 (Proposed East Sooke Fire Hall) addresses the need for a new fire hall, as the existing one was significantly below standards. It was deemed antiquated and undersized, and did not meet current building code require-ments. Its proximity to a community park also posed safety concerns for children playing in the area. Further, it lacked drill and train-ing areas, it could not serve as a post-disaster facility, and expansion or reconfiguring the existing structure was not possible.

    After a successful referendum last sum-mer, at which time East Sooke residents voted 339 to 138 in favour of

    the new fire hall, the focus has been on the planning and design of the hall. A detailed Request for Proposals had nine firms respond.

    David Nairne and Associates were the winning architects, and the decision was made to proceed with an all steel fireproof interior and exterior, because of the enhanced sur-vivability of the build-ing after a major earth-quake or forest inter-face fire. Construction is slated to start in late June. The target date for a fully operational East Sooke fire hall is early 2015.

    Dr. George May, the Chair of the East Sooke Fire Commission, said,

    the fire hall design achieves the tests of affordability, long life, and capacity to sur-vive a major fire and earthquake. We expect this design to meet the needs of East Sooke for a long time to come.

    Besides the obvious benefits of providing a go-to place in case of tsunami or forest fire, said Brian White, the new fire hall will include a built-in water tank loading station for residents of East Sooke. The existing waterline will also be extended, to just before Anderson Cove.

    With notes from Brian White, ESFCF

    SOOKE NEWS MIRROR - Wednesday, February 26, 2014 www.sookenewsmirror.com 7

    East Sookes fire hall speeding alongArchitects rendering of the new fire hall.

    SOOKE NEWS MIRROR - Wednesday, February 26, 2014 www.sookenewsmirror.com 7

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    Port Renfrew Water Service Port Renfrew Sewer Service Port Renfrew Street Lighting Service Wilderness Mountain Water ServiceTake Notice that the annual sitting of the Parcel Tax Roll Review Panel, pursuant to Sections 204 and 205 of the Community Charter will be held at 12:00pm on Wednesday, March 12, 2014 at the Capital Regional District, Room 651, 625 Fisgard Street, Victoria, British Columbia to consider any complaints respecting the parcel tax roll and authenticate the roll in accordance with legislation.The Parcel Tax Roll Review Panel will hear only those complaints or appeals filed in writing with the undersigned at least 48 hours in advance of its sitting.A copy of the complete roll will be available for inspection at the Capital Regional District, 625 Fisgard St., Victoria, BC from 8:30 am to 4:30 pm M-F and the Port Renfrew Post Office, 32 Queesto St. Port Renfrew, BC from 9:00 am to 5:00 pm Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays and 10:30 am to 3:00 pm Thursdays, commencing February 26, 2014.Dated at Victoria, British Columbia, this 26th day of February, 2014.

    Diana E. Lokken, CPA, CMA General Manager, Finance & Technology Dept. Capital Regional District

    Notice ofParcel Tax Roll Review Panel2014

  • 8 www.sookenewsmirror.com Wednesday, February 26, 2014 - SOOKE NEWS MIRROR8 www.sookenewsmirror.com WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2014 - SOOKE NEWS MIRROR

    EDITORIAL Rod Sluggett PublisherPirjo Raits EditorBritt Santowski ReporterThe Sooke News Mirror is published every Wednesday by Black Press Ltd. | 1A-6631 Sooke Road, Sooke, B.C. V9Z 0A3 | Phone: 250-642-5752 WEB: WWW.SOOKENEWSMIRROR.COM

    How to reach us:

    Phone 250-642-5752; fax 250-642-4767

    Rod Sluggett [email protected]

    Harla Eve [email protected]

    Pirjo Raits [email protected]

    Britt Santowski [email protected]

    Rod SluggettJoan Gamache [email protected]

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    [email protected]

    Harla Eve, [email protected] Sluggett

    General:

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    2010 WINNER

    Launching a solution is difficult

    Council is still trying to find a resolution to the mess at the public boat launch. Local fishers feel they shouldnt have to pay for using it as their tax dollars went into building it.

    An annual local users card has been suggested, which would give locals a discount on parking and launching. In many other marinas around the area a yearly decal is purchased and displayed on the vehicle parking in the lot. But the issue is not a fee for locals but the parking. If the designated parking spaces at the hotel are full, then those who launch their boats have to park elsewhere and elsewhere is on the highway. This leads to congestion, and a dangerous situation for pedestrians walking along West Coast Road. The launch should never have been built where it is.

    So what is the solution? The neighbouring property owners have been dealing with the boat launch fee collection and they have done it very well. Why not let them continue to do so? People are already crossing over to use their fish washing station at no cost. It has already been stated that the boat launch fees are not a money maker, so why nickle and dime the district to death. It would be a lot cheaper than the $30,000 cost which was apparently in an RFP. Strike an agreement/contract with Jocks Dock and be done with the whole business. They already have more in place as far as fishing amenities than the district does. The district doesnt need the little bit of money from boat launching and working together would easily solve this issue, and it would save the Sooke taxpayer some money.

    It isnt rocket science and it doesnt have to be so complicated. Council is never going to please everyone nor should they try. Just do the best for the most and stick with your decisions. Its time this issue went away... but we will still have the parking to contend with unfortunately.

    FEATURE LETTER

    As new residents of Sooke, we have taken an interest in your local ways and news, and have nothing but good to say about this beauti-ful town, except perhaps some of its reporters seem to indulge in spreading misinformation spe-cifically marijuana-related news as is our interest as medical marijuana patients.

    Attacks on medical marijuana patients and their current plight is not only hurtful and belittling, but Mr. Fletcher seems to be making his stories up as he goes along. Where did he get his information? And how did he calculate the specific num-ber of medical marijuana patients in any given area? By his own confes-sion, these numbers are not known to anyone except Health Canada. Is Mr. Fletcher privy to private health information of this provinces peo-ple? How does he know that half of the 38,000 patients live in B.C.? Sensationalism or propaganda? His words are sarcastic and by his own admissions baseless, since Otta-was bungled medical pot scheme conceals the location of licensed growers from provincial and local governments. Except Mr. Fletcher?

    First of all, we, as Canadians have been given the right to grow our own herbal medicine and we take it seriously. We can now (until April 1) control our own health, by grow-ing organically and carefully choos-ing our seeds for strength and char-acteristics suited to our individual medical needs. We take an interest in our medicine and oppose corporate

    approach akin to big pharma. Now we live in fear of police raids on our homes, private medical information out there for public consumption, humiliation and ostracism. How has that made it any safer? For who?And who is Mr Fletcher to decide what a genuine condition is? And yes, Mr. Fletcher, marijuana is a good medicinal remedy for your beloved pets too.

    The RCMP Inspector is going to go after all of them? When in his-tory have your medical records and private information been publicly displayed and challenged by police forces?

    Mr. Fletchers mentions of pris-ons and motor cycle gangs are com-pletely irrelevant to the medical mar-ijuana issue and is simply sensation-alism and fear mongering without fact.

    So. Now, The police and fire department have proposed an amnesty or grace period, allowing people to disclose their location and have it properly dismantled without penalty, to help deal with the vol-ume. All of the equipment that was hard won by months of saving for a better light system to increase our medication? Security for our homes? We didnt need security until Health Canada sent out our information for all of the world to see. And promises, that as patients, we would never have to deal with public knowledge of our conditions. This new system Health Canada has set up is done so that only the elite and those akin to big pharma will be considered for

    licensing. Mr. Fletchers insulting comments

    are just adding to the confusion about medical marijuana and Marc Emerys posted information which offers patients scientific studies and new research.

    Dana Larsons Sensible BC cam-paign far from ill-conceived or fail-ure with 200,000 signatures, shows that a common sense approach to marijuana is warranted. In regards to medical compassion centres, and their pricing ... just another reason why patients need the right to grow their own medicine.

    We are not criminals, we are just grandparents who live a very mod-est life. And, for the most part, the 38,000 patients Mr. Fletcher refers to, are simply that patients.

    So, in the end, people like Mr. Fletcher, who prefer to bury their collective heads in the ground, fol-lowing the party line, instead of any real study or reporting of the astounding and mounting scientific evidence regarding the benefits of marijuana, will perpetuate the real farce, that he accuses the medi-cal marijuana community of in his biased and uninformed view.

    Good luck and good health to you Mr. Fletcher. Lets hope the police dont come to your home with boots and batons looking for your pre-scription of choice any time soon.

    Diane PenyigeStop Reefer Madness Canada

    Sooke

    Insulting comments irk pot patients

    OUR VIEW EDITORIAL CARTOON

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    Housing attainable for everyone

    I was reading in your February 19 (page B8) issue about Housing ends Homelessness, and ending it by 2018.

    I find this ridiculous and absurd. We could end homelessness now if the Catholic church (profit $170-billion 2013) and the top 10 businesses in excess of $38-trillion yes tril-lion dollars decided to do so. Instead it always falls on the taxpayer, by donations to charities. Sure the rich donate too, but only enough to get their exemptions.

    We allow ourselves, in these so called times of economic crisis, to let politi-cians, corporations and churches gain financial wealth, while others go without.

    Our schools keep receiving cutbacks making our kids the second worst taught in the country. Classes are too big. Teachers (as well as most public employees) are under-paid while government business executives continue to make unre-alistic bonuses.

    In fact, it would cost around $20-billion to end homelessness world-wide.

    My question is why dont the governments do it then?

    Andrew Ferguson

    Sooke

    Not too late for marijuana reforms

    Rally in Victo-ria. Thank you so much to everyone that made it to the rally at the pro-vincial Legislature on February 11. It was so inspiring to see hun-dreds of our support-ers gather from Victoria to Dawson Creek - and everywhere in between - to stand shoulder to shoulder in front of the Legislature. It was a powerful reminder of the strength of our movement and our ongoing dedication to sensible marijuana pol-icy reform.

    Another step back-wards. Tens of thou-sands of Canadians depend on medical marijuana every day. Yet the upcoming changes to the medical marijuana program will price many patients out of the market for their medicine. Anyone that cant afford medical marijuana through the new system will either have to suffer without their medicine or turn to the black market.

    Essentially, the Harper government is creating criminals out of otherwise law-abid-ing citizens and placing many of them at seri-ous risk.

    Medical users do not deserve to be criminal-

    ized or pushed into the black market because they cant afford their medicine at market rates.

    More drug law hypocrisy. The pro-vincial government has decided to move forward with reform to liquor laws. Even though alcohol abuse kills approximately 100,000 Canadians every year, our politi-cians promote relaxed liquor laws while refus-ing to stand up for hun-dreds of thousands of British Columbians who support marijuana reform. Were not nec-essarily against the new liquor regulations, but it is utter hypocrisy to increase access to alco-hol while also arresting more and more mari-juana users each year. Marijuana is safer than alcohol, so why is the B.C. government driv-ing us to drink? Thats why we need to keep fighting!

    Every action we take brings us one step closer to our goal. Its never too late. If you havent had a chance to get involved yet get started today. Every action counts.

    Dana Larsen Sensible BC

    Director

    Stepping in doggie doo

    This is directed toward the people who take their dogs to the Maple Avenue dog

    toilet (I mean park). To those who pick up after your dogs, my dog and I thank you. As to those who dont, I truly hope that you step in it, wearing shoes with a really deep, hard-to-clean tread. Or maybe the ball youre throwing for your dog will land in it, and youll pick it up without looking at it first.

    I have no words at all for the humans (at least two recently) who decided to leave piles of their own and couldnt even be both-ered to step into the bushes.

    Tia LeschkeSooke

    Altering reality

    Corporate thugs mas-querading as Conserva-tive MPs in Ottawa like to dress up party ide-ology as evidence but we should reject this approach in B.C.

    Tom Fletcher wants to continue his diatribe against the BCTF by posing the union as the bad guys in the ongo-ing class war between the BC Liberals and the teachers union. Somehow Fletcher can pan clear evidence and come to a completely opposite opinion to those in the know. The judge who perused the evidence, (still kept hid-den by the Clark gov-ernment), said the BC Liberals acted in bad faith by pushing the

    teachers into a strike position to gain votes. Then the lead govern-ment negotiator swore under oath that the government strategy was to be so unreason-able in negotiations that the BCTF would have to strike putting thousands of parents, employers, kids and teachers into province wide chaos. This is from the families first claims of Premier Clark.

    So, either the judge doesnt know what shes doing or the gov-ernments chief nego-tiator has lied under oath in admitting his goal and the govern-ments goal was to force a province wide shutdown of schools.

    Maybe Tom Fletcher is so far out of it on the right wing that his Conservative soap box doesnt provide a clear view of what many of us can plainly see. The strategy of altering real-ity to suit political goals employed by federal Conservatives is scary and doesnt belong in our province.

    Ted Roberts Sooke

    We asked: Do you volunteer in Sooke? With what organization?

    Yes. I volunteer with Food CHI and the Sooke Fine Arts.

    Jocelyne RoySooke

    Yes. Sooke Food CHI and other food security groups.

    Mary Alice JohnsonSooke

    Yes. The Children's Garden Club, Sunriver Community

    Gardens, and just lending a hand where it is needed.

    Byron ClarkSooke

    Yes. With the Sooke Fall Fair and Shirley Womens Institute, and

    others. I have also don Meals on Wheels. Its a way of life.

    Martha MooreSooke

    letters

    Deliver by mail or hand to our office, or e-mail [email protected] newsmirror.com

    Letters should be 300 words or less, and we may edit for length, tone and accuracy. Please include contact information.

    LettersContd on page 10

    Theres more onlinewww.sookenewsmirror.com

  • Blasting Fletchers opinion

    Regarding Tom Fletchers February 12 column, not only should medical mari-juana be made avail-able to patients in need, but adult recreational use should be regu-lated too. Drug policies modeled after alcohol prohibition have given rise to a youth-oriented black market. Illegal drug dealers dont ID for age. So much for protecting the children.

    Throwing more money at the prob-lem is no solution. Attempts to limit the supply of illegal drugs while demand remains constant only increase the profitability of drug trafficking. For addic-tive drugs like heroin, a spike in street prices leads desperate addicts to increase criminal activity to feed desper-ate habits. The drug war doesnt fight crime, it fuels crime.

    Taxing and regulat-ing marijuana, the most popular illicit drug, is a cost-effective alter-native to never-ending drug war failure. As long as marijuana distri-bution is controlled by organized crime, con-sumers will continue to come into contact with hard drugs like meth-amphetamine, cocaine and heroin. Marijuana prohibition is a gate-way drug policy.

    Robert Sharpe, MPA

    Common Sense for Drug Policy

    Washington, DC

    The world and pollution

    John Kerry, Secre-tary of State for the U.S.A. says on TV that the pollution of the atmosphere is out of control. He says this is why we are having all the bad weather condi-tions around the world.

    We have to stop put-ting all those C02s into the air. The scientists have been telling us for years, but the govern-ments dont seem to want to listen. In China the air is so bad you cant see three feet in front of you and they wear masks.

    Last month we had a lot of form the weather people said a lot of it was smog from China.

    So, why is the govern-ment of Canada and B.C. pushing to sell oil, coal and gas to China to created more pollu-tion? The writing is on

    the wall, we have to stop now. So we would like an answer from the B.C. Liberals, from Christy Clark Premier as to why they are not

    going to cut back on polluting the air.

    Dont forget when true oil, coal and gas is gone, its gone. Its not a renewable resource. The oil companies say we have enough oil for a couple of decades. Well, thats only 20 years.

    I suppose we will get a letter back, but it will say nothing, just smoke and mirrors, and not the answer we want, saying they will stop. They wills at we need jobs, but at what cost? Send the oil east where they are importing it. Gingrich agrees with Kerry that we have to stop (releasing) the car-bon into the air, in the U.S.A. The Americans are warning us, but I dont see the Govern-ment of Canada saying anything.

    Gordon Wille Stewart

    Sooke

    10 www.sookenewsmirror.com Wednesday, February 26, 2014 - SOOKE NEWS MIRROR

    letters

    Britt Santowski photo

    three-year-old Gavin scoots around in a bluetooth controlled go-cart, made by troy, Alex and rowan at the electronic display table at the eMCs Open House held on thursday, February 20.

    10 www.sookenewsmirror.com Wednesday, February 26, 2014 - SOOKE NEWS MIRROR

    Accommodations ............................................................49Accounting ........................................................................50Appliances .........................................................................51Arena Seaparc ................................................................120Art (Galleries & Supplies) .............................................51Automotive.................................................................52-59Bakery ................................................................................60Barbers (Hair Cutting & Styling) .................................60Beauty ..........................................................................60-61Bicycles ..............................................................................61Blasting/Drilling ................................................................62Brewing ..............................................................................62Business Services ............................................................62Cabinet Makers ...............................................................62Camping ............................................................................62Carpets (Cleaning) ..........................................................62Car Wash ..........................................................................63Cement Finishing.............................................................64Chamber of Commerce ................................................64Child Care see DaycareChimney Sweeps .............................................................64Chiropractors ..................................................................65Churches ...........................................................................10Cleaning Services .................................................65 &122Coffee House ...................................................................65Community Associations Services ........................65-66Community Contacts.................................................MAPComputers .......................................................................67Concrete ........................................Inside Back Cover, 64Construction ..............................................................63-70Corner Store see GrocerCounselling .......................................................................71Counter Tops ...................................................................71Dance Studio ....................................................................71Day Care ...........................................................................71Decks .................................................................................72Dentist ...............................................................................73District of Sooke ............................................................... 4Drafting & Design (Building) ........................................73Driving School .................................................................73Drywall ..............................................................................73Electrical/Contractors ....................................................74Emergency Numbers ................................................. 4Employment......................................................................74Excavating....................................................................75-78Farm Supplies ...................................................................79Fax ............................................................. Front Cover, 83

    Fencing ...............................................................................79Financial Services ............................................................80First Nations ....................................................................80Fishing Charters ..............................................................81Fitness ................................................................................82Flowers & Florists ...........................................................82Garbage Bins ....................................................................85Garbage Disposal ......................................................83-84Garage Doors ..................................................................83Garden Centre ................................................................85Gift Stores ........................................................................86Glass ...................................................................................86Golf Course .....................................................................86Government .....................................................................86Grocery .............................................................................87Gutters ..............................................................................87Hardware .................................. Outside & Inside CoverHauling ...............................................................................87Health ................................................................................87Health Foods ....................................................................87Hot Water Tanks see Plumbing SuppliesInsurance ...........................................................................88Janitorial ............................................................................88Jewelry ...............................................................................88Kayaks ................................................................................89Landscape Architects ....................................................89Landscape & Lawn Care ..........................................89-92Landscape Supplies ...................................................91-92Lawyers ........................................................................92-95Legion see Royal Canadian LegionLiquor ................................................................................96Locksmiths ........................................................................96Marinas/Marine ..........................................................96-97Masonry.............................................................................98Massage .......................................................................98-99MLA see GovernmentMotorcycle (Sales & Service) ......................Back CoverMoving & Storage ............................................................99Music ................................................................................100Natural Gas ....................................................................100Newspaper .....................................................................100Notary Public .................................................................101Optician ...........................................................................102Optometrists .................................................................102Paint ................................................................Inside CoverPainting ................................................................... 102-103Parks & Recreation .......................................................120

    Pest Control ...................................................................103Pets ......................................................................... 104-105Pharmacy ................................................... Cover, 106-107Physiotherapists .............................................................108Pizza ........................................................................ 108-110Plumbing (Service & Supplies) .................................. 111-114Pre-school .......................................................................114Printing ............................................................................114Professional Listings .......................................................7-8Propane Services ...........................................................115Pubs see RestaurantsPumps ..............................................................................116Real Estate ............................................................. 116-119Recreation ......................................................................120Renovations ....................................................................120Rentals (Equipment) .....................................................120Residential Listings ....................................................11-47Restaurants & Pubs ............................................. 121-122Restorations ...................................................................122Roofing ................................................................... 123-124Royal Canadian Legion ................................................124Saw Mills ..........................................................................125Schools ..............................................................................10Seafood ............................................................................125Sea Cadets ......................................................................126Security ............................................................................125Septic Services ...............................................................126Sewing ..............................................................................127Shopping ..........................................................................128Signs .................................................................................129Sooke Band see First NationsSpa ....................................................................................129Sporting Goods .............................................................129Storage.................................................................... 130-131Surveyors ........................................................................131Tattoo ..............................................................................132Taxi ...................................................................................132Tires ........................................................................ 132-133Towing .............................................................................133Travel ................................................................................133Tree Service ...................................................................134Tutoring ...........................................................................135Veterinary Services .......................................................135Welding ...........................................................................135Windows (Blinds, Curtains, Glass) ............................136

    INDEX

    2014 SOOKE LIONS

    CLUB

    $5

    BUSINESS DIRECTORY

    FOR SOOKE, EAST SOOKE, JORD

    AN RIVER & PORT RENFREW

    w w w . s o ok e l i o n s p

    h o n e b o ok . c o m

    Phone: 778-425-4420 Fax: 778-425-443

    8 Email: [email protected]

    SOOKE Home hardware6626 Sooke Rd 25

    0-642-6366

    sookehomehardware.com

    see ad next page

    hardwareHome

    Sooke River Hotel

    Castle Beer & Wine Store

    Licensed Liquor Store ..250

    -642-5055

    9am - 11pm

    Yens Kitchen ...............250

    -642-3111

    4pm - 9pmOPEN SEVEN

    DAYS A WEEK

    6309 Sooke Road, Sooke, B

    C

    #4000-6660 Sooke

    Rd

    250-642-5229

    OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK

    UNTIL 10PM

    Pharmacist Always Av

    ailable

    Canada Post Outlet

    1-6649 Sooke Road, PO Box 313, Sooke V9Z 1G1

    www.sookecopycentre.comemail:[email protected]

    It appears that there were some errors in the index in this years Directory Please cut this out and put it in its place.

    ARE YOU INTERESTED IN LEARNING MORE ABOUT THE PROPOSED

    DEVELOPMENT OF PLAYING FIELDS IN SUNRIVER ESTATES?

    SUNRIVER PLAYING FIELDSCommunity Information Meeting

    To do that, please attend a Community Information meeting where District of Sooke staff and representatives from Sunriver Estates will outline the proposed location and layout of playing fi elds in Sunriver Estates. The meeting will include:

    A presentation by District staff (at 7:30 pm) Plans, displays & sketches A question and answer period Questionnaire and comment sheets

    BE A PART OF SHAPING YOURCOMMUNITY COME AND

    GIVE YOUR INPUT!

    Hosted By:The District of Sooke

    (250) 642-1634Email: [email protected]

    Tuesday, March 4, 20147:00 pm

    Sunriver Sales Centre2350 Sunriver Way

    e Sooke Harbourside Lions say ank You to all our guests who attended A Taste of BC. It was a successful evening and thanks to your generosity we raised over $6000 for local organizations, projects and charities.A huge thank you to everyone who contributed items for our very successful Silent Auction. is is a critical part of our fund raising and your generosity is most appreciated.A special thank you to the establishments of Sooke for their generous donations of food which completed our tasting event: 4 Beaches B&B, 4 Beaches Catering, Andy the Pizza Man 2 for 1, Cathys Corner Cafe, EMCS Culinary Arts Program, Jennys Old Country Fare, Little Vienna Bakery Cafe and Marketplace, River Road Specialty Chocolate, Sooke Harbour House, Stick in the Mud Co ee House, Stickleback West Coast Eatery, Steeped Tea by Laurie Spence, Stone Pipe Grill, Village Food Market, Tugwell Creek Honey Farm & Meadery and Esha Elliott of deVine Vineyards.Finally words of gratitude to Paul McTavish who manned the beer garden, Janet McTavish who en-tertained us and Reta Vasey of EMCS who helped us throughout the planning and event day.It was a wonderful evening! ank you ALL.

    e Sooke Harbourside Lions say ank You to all our

    Thank you!

    Taste of BCFOOD & WINE

    CHECK US OUT

    ON

    LIONS

    SOOKE

    Harbourside

    SaturdayFeb. 8th7 - 9:30 pmEMCS Community School - tickets $30SHOPPERS, PEOPLES, LITTLE VIENNA& PEMBERTON HOLMES

    PLUS... Beer, Beverages& Locally Made Appetizers!

  • Britt SantowskiSooke News Mirror

    Maybe youve heard of wine pairings. This is when a wine is matched with a food, specifically chosen to bring out a certain je ne cest quoi in the food. Or a beer pairing (growing in popularity).

    Leave it to the people of Sooke to pioneer a new genre in the art of pairing. In the name of good taste and good art, and in the spirit of good charity, The Mix by Rics introduces a feast for all of the senses in a unique food-and-art pairing charity evening on March 8. The evening is designed to bring together local visual and culinary art-ists, and is hosted in conjunction with the Sooke Fine Arts Society.

    Named Appetite for Art, this show allows diners to appreciate work by local artists in a gallery style setting at the same time as enjoy-ing the artisan canaps that will be created to accompany the art-work.

    According to the Sooke Fine Arts Face-book page (facebook.com/SookeFineArts/), Accepted artwork will serve as the basis for a series of complimen-tary appetizers created by Chef Siebert, to be displayed alongside the companion piece.

    The idea of this unique pairing came from Dan Houle, assis-

    tant manager at The Mix by Rics and the event coordinator, and it will hopefully be the first in a new annual tra-dition for Sooke.

    The event was inspired by the the talents of Executive Chef Ryan Siebert, who began as the banquet chef about a year ago and put on the execu-tive hat in August.

    Our new executive chef is very talented and creative, said Houle. We wanted to find a way to showcase his talents. We also wanted to gibe back to the community.

    Recognizing the rich art culture of Sooke made it an easy mar-riage, welding together

    food and art in this fun-draising event.

    Appetite for Art is a great way to showcase the fantastic talent that we have right here in Sooke and all for a wor-thy cause, detailed Houle. The town is building a reputation for fine dining as well as fine art, so this seemed like a great way to bring the two together. Our executive chef at The Mix, Ryan Siebert and Sous Chef Adam Guther are both very talented and innovative; I know Ryan and his team are really looking forward to the challenge and we cant wait to see the results.

    According to the Sooke Fine Arts Face-

    book page, 20 per cent commission on all sales will be shared between the Sooke Food Bank and the SFAS Youth Scholarship Fund.

    Appetite for Art has been designed to be as interactive as pos-sible with many artists and the chefs on hand to talk show-goers through their work as well as sommeliers from select B.C. winer-ies, which will be pair-ing fine wines with some of the art.

    The response from Sookes artists for this intriguing event was outstanding, said Cath-erine Keogan, Execu-tive Director of the Sooke Fine Arts Society. The calibre of work submitted really speaks to the wealth of talent in our community, and I do believe the artists are quite excited to see their work echoed in Chef Sieberts culinary creations. With entry by donation, we are delighted this commu-nity collaboration is so accessible to the pub-lic, and we invite every-one to join us for this

    unique experience.Appetite for Art will

    be open to the general public on March 8 from 7-9 p.m. in the grand ballroom at the Best Western Premier Pres-tige Oceanfront Resort. Entry is by voluntary donation to the Sooke Food Bank and the Sooke Fine Arts Youth Scholarship fund. Appetizers (or, as they are known in higher society, canaps) are included in the admis-sion, and will accom-pany the art pieces. The artwork on display at the event will also be on sale with a portion of the proceeds being donated to the chari-ties involved.

    The Mix by Rics will be hosting a VIP gala dinner on the evening, beginning at 6:30 p.m., which will include a three-course dinner as well as a preview of the show itself. For dinner reservations call The Mix by Rics on 778-425-2529 and ask for Dan, Val or Nicky.

    SOOKE NEWS MIRROR - Wednesday, February 26, 2014 www.sookenewsmirror.com 11

    2x2Jake Grant

    Sooke charities get an Appetite for Art

    Veronique Gagnon photo

    One of the appetizers (Tuna Poke) from The Mix by Rics.

    SOOKE NEWS MIRROR - Wednesday, February 26, 2014 www.sookenewsmirror.com 11

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    wishes Sooke Happy Holidays!

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    Free Ultra Car WashValue Card at Suds and Pups

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    Yateman AutomotiveHonesty, Integrity... and service with a smile!

    Call to book appointment

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    JAKE GRANT

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    Additi onal details and informati on is available by contacti ng the Chamber o ce at

    250.642.6112 or via email at [email protected]

    ANNUAL CHAMBER BUSINESS EXCELLENCE AWARDS

    Call for nominationsNominations are now being accepted from the general public.Open to all Sooke