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SELC Career College, 2 nd Floor 321 Water Street, Vancouver BC, Canada, V6B 1B8 TEL: (604) 488-0780 FAX: (604) 608-9260 Revised: May 9, 2018 SELC CAREER COLLEGE STUDENT Orientation and policy manual (Hospitality)

SELC CAREER COLLEGE STUDENT Orientation and policy manual ... · SELC Career College, 2nd Floor 321 Water Street, Vancouver BC, Canada, V6B 1B8 TEL: (604) 488-0780 FAX: (604) 608-9260

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SELC Career College, 2nd

Floor 321 Water Street, Vancouver BC, Canada, V6B 1B8

TEL: (604) 488-0780 FAX: (604) 608-9260

Revised: May 9, 2018

SELC CAREER COLLEGE

STUDENT Orientation and

policy manual (Hospitality)

ii

Revised: May 9, 2018

Table of Contents Mission Statement ........................................................................................................................... 1

Address and Contact Information ............................................................................................... 2

General Office Hours .................................................................................................................. 2

Class Time .................................................................................................................................. 2

Admission requirements by program .............................................................................................. 3

Hospitality Management Diploma Program (2 years) .................................................................... 6

Hospitality Today: An Introduction ............................................................................................ 8

Managing Front Office Operations ............................................................................................. 9

Managing Service in Food and Beverage Operations............................................................... 10

Managing Beverage Service ..................................................................................................... 10

Hospitality Sales and Marketing ............................................................................................... 11

Managing Hospitality Human Resources ................................................................................. 11

Hospitality Facilities Management and Design ........................................................................ 12

Managing Housekeeping Operations ........................................................................................ 12

Contemporary Club Management ............................................................................................. 13

Food Safety: Managing with the HACCP System .................................................................... 14

Planning and Control for Food and Beverage Operations ........................................................ 14

Basic Hotel and Restaurant Accounting ................................................................................... 15

Supervision in the Hospitality Industry .................................................................................... 15

Leadership and Management in the Hospitality Industry ......................................................... 16

Security and Loss Prevention Management .............................................................................. 17

Convention Management and Service ...................................................................................... 17

Hospitality Management: 1 Year-CO-OP ..................................................................................... 18

Hospitality Today: An Introduction .......................................................................................... 20

Managing Front Office Operations ........................................................................................... 20

Managing Service in Food and Beverage Operations............................................................... 21

Hospitality Sales and Marketing ............................................................................................... 21

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Revised: May 9, 2018

Managing Housekeeping Operations ........................................................................................ 22

Planning and Control for Food and Beverage Operations ........................................................ 23

Basic Hotel and Restaurant Accounting ................................................................................... 23

Supervision in the Hospitality Industry .................................................................................... 24

Hospitality Management: 6 Months- CO-OP ............................................................................... 24

Individual Course Summaries ....................................................................................................... 26

Hospitality Today: An Introduction .......................................................................................... 26

Managing Front Office Operations ........................................................................................... 27

Managing Service in Food and Beverage Operations............................................................... 27

Supervision in the Hospitality Industry .................................................................................... 28

Food & Beverage Management .................................................................................................... 28

Course outlines.............................................................................................................................. 30

Managing Service in Food and Beverage Operations............................................................... 30

Managing Beverage Service ..................................................................................................... 30

Food Safety: Managing with the HACCP System .................................................................... 31

Planning and Control for Food and Beverage Operations ........................................................ 31

School Policies .............................................................................................................................. 32

SELC Career College Admission Policy and Procedures......................................................... 32

Postponement Policy ................................................................................................................. 33

Attendance Policy ..................................................................................................................... 34

Leave of Absence / Vacation Policy ......................................................................................... 35

Code of Conduct and Dismissal Policy .................................................................................... 35

Bullying and Abuse Policy: .......................................................................................................... 37

Health and Safety Policy ........................................................................................................... 39

Work Experience Policy – Co-op Placement............................................................................ 40

Policy for repeating Modules .................................................................................................... 42

Dispute Resolution and Grades Appeal Policy ......................................................................... 43

Refund and Withdrawal Policy ................................................................................................. 45

Privacy Policy ........................................................................................................................... 46

English Only Policy .................................................................................................................. 47

iv

Revised: May 9, 2018

Cheating and Plagiarism Policy ................................................................................................ 48

Finances ........................................................................................................................................ 52

Vancouver Information ................................................................................................................. 53

Public Transportation .................................................................................................................... 54

Planning Trips ............................................................................................................................... 56

Car Rentals ................................................................................................................................ 57

Health and Dental Care ................................................................................................................. 57

Medical Care ............................................................................................................................. 57

Walk-In Clinics ......................................................................................................................... 58

Dental Care ............................................................................................................................... 58

Mental Health............................................................................................................................ 59

Phone Information ........................................................................................................................ 59

Cell Phone Options ................................................................................................................... 60

Contract Notes .......................................................................................................................... 60

Calling Home or Overseas ........................................................................................................ 61

Things to see and do in and around Vancouver ............................................................................ 62

Stanley Park .............................................................................................................................. 62

Vancouver Art Gallery .............................................................................................................. 62

Granville Island ......................................................................................................................... 62

Vancouver Aquarium ................................................................................................................ 62

English Bay ............................................................................................................................... 62

Grouse Mountain ...................................................................................................................... 63

Capilano Suspension Bridge ..................................................................................................... 63

Robson Street ............................................................................................................................ 63

Granville Street ......................................................................................................................... 63

Yaletown ................................................................................................................................... 63

Beaches ..................................................................................................................................... 63

Historic Gastown ...................................................................................................................... 64

Whistler ..................................................................................................................................... 64

Vancouver Island and Gulf Islands ........................................................................................... 64

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Victoria ..................................................................................................................................... 64

Vancouver Trolley Hop-On-Hop- Off Tour ............................................................................. 65

Bloedel Conservatory................................................................................................................ 65

Museum of Anthropology ......................................................................................................... 65

Science World ........................................................................................................................... 65

Movie Theatres ......................................................................................................................... 65

Craigslist ....................................................................................................................................... 66

Local Hostels ............................................................................................................................ 66

Local Places of Worship ........................................................................................................... 67

North American Practices ......................................................................................................... 67

Canadian People........................................................................................................................ 68

Tipping and Taxes..................................................................................................................... 68

Laws and Regulations ............................................................................................................... 68

Tax Refund for Visitors ............................................................................................................ 69

Public Holidays ......................................................................................................................... 69

Canadian Facts .............................................................................................................................. 70

1

Revised: May 9, 2018

Mission Statement

Providing an environment where student success is the key component in

achieving the highest standards set forth by SELC Career College. Our goal is to

provide students with current up-to-date classroom facilitation and co-op

placement training to provide them with the job-ready skills needed to succeed in

today’s competitive environment.

The SELC Career College Team

2

Revised: May 9, 2018

General School Information

Address and Contact Information

SELC Career College

321 Water Street, 2nd floor, V6B 1B8

Vancouver - British Columbia – Canada

Phone: (604) 488-0780

Fax: (604) 608-9260

Email: [email protected]

Website: selccareercollege.com

WhatsApp: SELC Canada (604 722-8640)

LINE: selccanada

Kakao: selccanada

24-hour Emergency Contact Number: 604 773-7507

General Office Hours

Monday to Friday: 8:30 am – 9:30 pm

Class Time

Program Day(s) Time

Hospitality Management (6 months) (Daytime) Tuesday, Thursday 9:00 am – 4:30 pm

Hospitality Management (6 months) (Daytime) Friday 9:00 am – 3:30 pm

**Hospitality Management (6 months) (Evening) Monday to Friday 5:00 pm – 9:30 pm

Hospitality Management (1 year) (Daytime) Monday, Wednesday 9:00 am – 4:30 pm

Hospitality Management (1 year) (Daytime) Friday 9:00 am – 3:30 pm

*Hospitality Management (1 year) (Evening) Monday to Friday 5:00 pm – 9:30 pm

*Hospitality Management (2 year) (Evening)

Food and Beverage Management

Monday to Friday

TBA

5:00 pm – 9:30 pm

TBA

* Hospitality Management 1 & 2 years – Evenings is scheduled to begin April 2, 2018.

** Hospitality Management 6 months – Evenings is scheduled to begin June 25, 2018.

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Revised: May 9, 2018

Admission requirements by program

Hospitality Management Diploma Program

Applicants must be 19 years of age or older;

Applicants must have completed a minimum of high school diploma;

An interview to determine suitability to the program;

Proof of medical insurance;

Completed application form to the College;

Paid non-refundable enrolment and registration fee;

Signed registration agreement form;

Admission test and oral interview with a passing exam score for international students.

In lieu of our admissions test, students may submit test scores from the following:

TOEFL (paper based): 530

TOEFL (IBT): 65

IELTS: 5.5

LPI Level 5 with essay 25

TOEIC: 605

Or has successfully reached the Upper Intermediate Level at SELC English Language

Centre.

(Program admission requirements may not be waived by the student or the institution)

Hospitality Management Program – 1 Year

Applicants must be 19 years of age or older.

Applicants who wish to qualify as Domestic Students must provide proof of their legal status as

Canadian citizens or permanent residents,

Grade 12 Diploma or Applicants must have successfully completed 200 hours of work in the

general Hospitality/Food & Beverage industry (written evidence is required).

Applicants must complete and submit an admissions form to the college.

Applicants must pay $250.00 for domestic students and $350.00 for international students as a

non-refundable enrolment and registration fee.

Applicants must read and sign to the effect that they have understand and agree with the college’s

policies and procedures, as well as any updates or inserts and the enrolment and registration

agreement.

Admission test with a passing grade for international students (oral interviews will only be

conducted if score between 60 and 69%)

Admission test is only required for students who have not completed their last two years of high

school in countries where English is an official language.

Applicants must provide proof of medical insurance.

In lieu of our admissions test, students may submit test scores from the following:

4

Revised: May 9, 2018

TOEFL (paper based): 530

TOEFL (IBT): 65

IELTS: 5.5

LPI Level 5 with essay 25

TOEIC: 605

Or has successfully reached the Upper Intermediate Level at SELC Language Centre.

(Program admission requirements may not be waived by the student or the institution)

Hospitality Management Program 6 months – (Co-op)

Applicants must be 19 years of age or older.

Applicants who wish to qualify as Domestic Students must provide proof of their legal status as

Canadian citizen or permanent resident,

Grade 12 Diploma or Applicants must have successfully completed 100 hours of work in the

general Hospitality/Food & Beverage industry (written evidence is required).

Applicants must complete and submit an admissions form to the college.

Applicants must pay $250.00 for domestic students and $350.00 for international students as a

non-refundable enrolment and registration fee.

Applicants must read and sign to the effect that they have understand and agree with the college’s

policies and procedures, as well as any updates or inserts and the enrolment and registration

agreement.

Admission test with a passing grade for international students (oral interviews will only be

conducted if score between 60 and 69%)

Admission test is only required for students who have not completed their last two years of high

school in countries where English is an official language.

Applicants must provide proof of medical insurance.

In lieu of our admissions test, students may submit test scores from the following:

TOEFL (paper based): 530

TOEFL (IBT): 65

IELTS: 5.5

LPI Level 5 with essay 25

TOEIC: 605

Or has successfully reached the Upper Intermediate Level at SELC Language Centre.

(Program admission requirements may not be waived by the student or the institution)

Food and Beverage Management Program

Applicants must have successfully completed 400 hours of work in the Hospitality/Food &

Beverage industry (written evidence is required) or, provide proof of high school graduation

(Grade 12 or equivalent)

Applicants must be 19 years of age or older

5

Revised: May 9, 2018

All applicants (international and domestic) must complete a language assessment test in order to

determine eligibility for the program. Applicants must obtain a minimum of 70% on this test in

order to be eligible for the program.

There is an interview component to the assessment that will determine an applicant’s suitability to

the program. If an applicant is not deemed suitable for the program, their application may be

denied.

Applicants must complete and submit an admissions form to the college.

Applicants must pay $250.00 for domestic students and $350.00 for international students as a

non-refundable enrolment and registration fee.

Applicants must provide a copy of the highest diploma or degree that they have completed. They

must also submit a transcript for the above diploma/degree. All necessary documents must be

provided in a hardcopy format. All submitted documents become the property of the college.

Applicants must read and sign to the effect that they have understood and agree with the college’s

policies and procedures, any updates or inserts and the enrolment and registration agreement.

International applicants must provide proof of medical insurance.

In lieu of our admissions test, students may submit test scores from the following:

TOEFL (paper based): 530

TOEFL (IBT): 65

IELTS: 5.5

LPI Level 5 with essay 25

TOEIC: 605

Or has successfully reached the Upper Intermediate Level at SELC Language Centre.

(Program admission requirements may not be waived by the student or the institution)

6

Revised: May 9, 2018

Hospitality Management Diploma

Program (2 years)

Outline

Brief Program

Description

These courses provide the crucial link between academia and the

global hospitality industry. They give students the applied, real-world

knowledge employers seek. The courses prepare students for entry-

level and upper-level hospitality management positions, as well as

specific technical and supervisory job skills employers’ demand.

Career Opportunities Banquet Server, Cocktail Server, Food And Beverage Server, Room

Service Server, Bartender, Cafe Barista, Dining Room Supervisors,

Greeter, Hospitality Coordinator, Host/Hostess, Hotel Manager,

Hotel General Manager, Supervisor, Bell Hop, Hotel Receptionist,

Concierge, Front Desk Agent, Housekeeping Cleaner, Building

Maintenance, Maintenance Supervisor, Transportation Ticket Agent,

Reservation Agent, Travel Clerk, Tour Guide, Cruise Ship personnel.

Required Textbooks

'Hospitality Today: An Introduction,' 'Managing Front Office

Operations,' 'Managing Service in Food and Beverage Operations,'

'Managing Beverage Service,' 'Hospitality Sales and Marketing,'

'Managing Hospitality Human Resources,' 'Hospitality Facilities

Management and Design,' 'Managing Housekeeping Operations,'

'Contemporary Club Management,' 'Food Safety: Managing with the

HACCP System,' 'Planning and Control for Food and Beverage

Operations,' 'Basic Hotel and Restaurant Accounting,' 'Supervision in

the Hospitality Industry,' 'Leadership and Management in the

Hospitality Industry,' Security and Loss Prevention Management' and

'Convention Management and Service.'

Other Materials May vary per specific Work Experience requirements.

Program Duration

960 instructional hours and 960 hours of work experience, spread

over 24 months.

Homework Hours

480 Hours.

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Revised: May 9, 2018

Delivery Methods

Classroom (Instructor led); workshops (Food Safe, Serving it Right)

Additional

Instructional Methods

Co-Op Work Experience

Learning Objectives &

Outcomes

Students master the management and operational skills that make

hospitality and F&B properties thrive.

Student Progress/

Assessment Methods

Grades are composed of 4 elements: Final Examination, Assignments

and Quizzes, Class Participation, and Attendance. Course Outlines

will be provided first day of class. The final exam will consist of 100

multiple choice questions. Students who pass the final exam with a

score of 70% will receive a course certificate. Those who pass with a

score of 90% or higher, will receive a certificate that notes they

passed “with honours.”

Attendance

Expectations

Students will maintain a minimum of 80% attendance.

Graduation

Requirements

Maintain a 70% average on each of the 16 individual course

final exams; complete all exams, quizzes and assignments, as

well as participate in all discussions and activities

Successfully complete the Co-Op Placement components

Maintain a minimum of 80% attendance throughout the

duration of the program

Food Safe

Serving it Right

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Revised: May 9, 2018

Individual Course Summaries

HOSPITALITY TODAY: AN INTRODUCTION

Brief Course

Description

This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the many entities

that make up the hospitality industry, as well as an overview of today’s

hot issues, including ethical challenges and management concerns.

There are numerous examples, exhibits, and statistics give students an

up-to-date look at the dynamic hospitality field. The module reflects

new industry trends, management practices and the effect of technology

and social media on various aspects of hospitality. Some current topics

are: boutique/lifestyle hotels, Airbnb, global distribution systems, event

technology, emotional labour and Internet advertising.

Learning

Objectives/Outcomes

Understanding how service makes the difference. Describe the scope of

the travel and tourism industry in the changing world. Cite

opportunities for education, training, and career paths and development

in the hospitality industry. Detailing hospitality organizations:

restaurants, hotels and management. Understanding how hotels are

organized and managed. Explain the organization of club management.

Introducing students to the meeting industry. Floating resorts: the cruise

line business. Describe the process of managing and leading hospitality

enterprises. Manage human resources and manage labour trends.

Understand the marketing of the hospitality industry. Detail how

management companies manage hotels. Understand how franchising

big business in hospitality is. Explain ethics in hospitality management.

Managing Front Office Operations

Brief Course

Description

This course presents a systematic approach to front office procedures by

detailing the flow of business through a hotel, from the reservations

process to check-out and account settlement. The course also examines the

various elements of effective front office management, paying particular

attention to the planning and evaluation of front office operations and to

human resources management. Front office procedures and management

are placed within the context of the overall operation of a hotel.

Learning

Classify hotels in terms of their ownership, affiliation, and levels of

service. Describe how hotels are organized and explain how functional

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Revised: May 9, 2018

Objectives/Outcomes areas within hotels are classified. Summarize front office operations

during the four stages of the guest cycle. Discuss the sales dimension of

the reservations process and identify the tools managers use to track and

control reservations. List the seven steps of the registration process and

discuss creative registration options. Identify typical service requests that

guests make at the front desk. Explain important issues in developing and

managing a security program. Describe the process of creating and

maintaining front office accounts. Identify functions and procedures

related to the check-out and account settlement process. Discuss typical

cleaning responsibilities of the housekeeping department.

Managing Service in Food and Beverage

Operations

Brief Course

Description

This course provides students with practical skills and knowledge for

effective management of food service operations. It presents basic service

principles while emphasizing the importance of meeting and, whenever

possible, exceeding the expectations of guests.

Learning

Objectives/Outcomes

Define "moments of truth" and identify staff members needed in a food

service operation. Summarize typical restaurant server and bus person

duties. List and discuss the tasks that banquet servers and room service

attendants perform. Describe the duties of beverage servers and

bartenders. Identify legal restrictions and liability issues affecting the

service of alcoholic beverages. Explain how to tell when guests are

intoxicated, and outline the steps to take when stopping alcohol service to

them. Describe the importance of the menu to food service operations and

explain how it is planned and designed. Identify procedures and issues

involved with purchasing, receiving, storing, issuing, and controlling food

service operation supplies and equipment. Summarize design, decor, and

cleaning issues for food service operations.

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Revised: May 9, 2018

Managing Beverage Service Brief Course

Description

This course lays the groundwork for a basic understanding of beverage

service by explaining the beverage service process, describing the types of

positions commonly found in beverage operations, and focusing on such

beverages as beer, spirits, and wine. Included in the course are instructions

on responsible alcohol service, supervisory techniques, and procedures for

entry-level beverage service positions.

Learning

Objectives/Outcomes

Outline the process of beverage service. Describe the major types of

beverages establishments serve. Identify major beverage staff positions

and their responsibilities. Explain how establishments standardize brands,

abbreviations, and recipes for drinks. Describe how establishments ensure

safety and security for their staff members and guests. Identify the rituals

and procedures associated with beverage service. Explain how to serve

alcohol responsibly, recognizing legal restrictions, signs of intoxication,

and methods of intervention. Describe leadership styles and how to apply

them. Describe supervisory responsibilities such as communication,

human resource management, managing time, delegating tasks, and

controlling stress. Identify the basic ingredients of beer, how it is made,

stored, handled, and served.

Hospitality Sales and Marketing

Brief Course

Description

This course is designed to provide students with a solid background in

hospitality sales and marketing. The main focus is on practical sales

techniques for selling to targeted markets.

Learning

Objectives/Outcomes

Distinguish marketing from sales and identify trends that affect marketing

and sales in the hospitality industry. Identify and describe the key steps of

a marketing plan. Summarize the duties and responsibilities of positions

typically found in a hotel marketing and sales office. Describe the five

steps of a presentation sales call. Explain the basics of effective telephone

communication and describe various types of outgoing and incoming

telephone calls related to the marketing and sales function. Describe

internal marketing and sales. Explain the role of advertising, public

relations, and publicity in reaching prospective guests. Summarize how

hospitality properties are meeting the needs of business travelers. Explain

how hospitality properties are meeting the needs of leisure travelers.

Describe travel agencies and the travelers they serve.

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Revised: May 9, 2018

Managing Hospitality Human Resources

Brief Course

Description

This course presents a systematic approach to human resources

management in the hospitality industry. Students will analyze

contemporary issues and practices, as well as employment laws that have

an impact on the way people are managed.

Learning

Objectives/Outcomes

Describe the EEOC and distinguish between EEO laws and affirmative

action. Define "disability," and describe the Americans with Disabilities

Act (ADA) and its implications for human resource managers at

hospitality operations. Explain the importance of job analysis and job

design. Apply methods for forecasting labor demand, identify the

advantages and disadvantages of internal and external recruiting, and

explain the functions of a computer-based Human Resource Information

System (HRIS). Describe the importance of the selection process, explain

how managers use application forms and pre-employment tests as

selection tools, and identify the types of selection errors and biases

managers must overcome when screening job applicants. Explain the

purpose of an orientation program, distinguish between a general property

orientation and a specific job orientation, and identify specific

socialization strategies and approaches. Identify and explain the stages of

the training cycle, and describe various training methods. Describe the

functions of performance appraisals, describe commonly used methods of

appraising performance, and identify legal issues relating to performance

appraisals.

Hospitality Facilities Management and Design

Brief Course

Description

Provides hospitality managers and students with information they need to

know to manage the physical plant of a hotel or restaurant and work

effectively with the engineering and maintenance department.

12

Revised: May 9, 2018

Learning

Objectives/Outcomes

Identify a number of important roles played by hospitality facilities, the

two primary categories of facility operating costs, the components of each

category, and various factors that affect those costs. Describe several types

of maintenance, state the goals of maintenance management systems, and

describe computerized and Internet-based facilities management. Identify

the basic facilities-related concerns associated with guestrooms and

corridors, public space, recreation and exterior areas, back-of-the-house

areas, and the building's structure and exterior. Describe sustainability and

its role in the overall business strategy of a hospitality operation, and state.

Some of the principal measures facilities managers can take to minimize

and manage waste. Describe how to reduce occupational injury rates in the

hospitality industry and outline how building design and maintenance

affect safety. Outline water usage levels and patterns in the lodging

industry, and describe the basic structure of water and wastewater systems.

Explain various aspects and components of electrical systems, cite

important considerations regarding system design and operating standards,

and identify elements of an effective electrical system and equipment

maintenance program.

Managing Housekeeping Operations

Brief Course

Description

This course is designed to provide students with the principles of

housekeeping management as they apply specifically to the hospitality

industry.

Learning

Objectives/Outcomes

Identify the role of housekeeping in a hospitality operation. Explain how

to follow environmentally sound procedures for sustainable housekeeping.

Describe how to plan and organize the work of the hospitality

housekeeping department. Explain the role executive housekeepers play in

managing such human resource concerns as diversity, turnover,

recruitment, selection, training, scheduling, and motivation. Explain how

to manage inventories for linens, uniforms, guest loan items, machines and

equipment, cleaning supplies, and guest supplies. Describe how an

executive housekeeper budgets and controls expenses. Identify important

security concerns and the role that the members of the housekeeping

department play in creating a safe and secure property. Trace the flow of

laundry through an on-premises laundry and describe the function of each

machine.

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Revised: May 9, 2018

CONTEMPORARY CLUB MANAGEMENT

Brief Course

Description

This course introduces the student to the complex world of private club

management. The module reflects on “Effective Communication for Club

Managers” which covers common communication challenges; speaking,

writing and listening; important workplace communication issues,

technology and communication. As well an overview of facility

management responsibilities at a private club, sustainability, building

projects and quality assessments.

Learning

Objectives/Outcomes

Understanding how a club operates, including food & beverage. Lead a

club effectively. Understand the roles of: board of directors, general

manager and chief operating officer. Understand club communications,

marketing and human resources. Detailed the importance of membership

marketing. Understand the financial management role to keep the club

profitable. Work with club technology. Managing the entertainment in

clubs. Managing the facility management including: golf, fitness, spa,

tennis and aquatics.

Food Safety: Managing with the HACCP System

Brief Course

Description

Presents a systems approach to food safety that answers public health

concerns, reduces sanitation risks, and ensures satisfaction for food

establishment guests, staff members, and owners. Explains how to define

and implement sanitation quality, cost control, and risk reduction

standards in a food service operation.

Learning

Objectives/Outcomes

Define the term control points, and identify the ten control points in the

food service system. Identify the seven HACCP principles, and explain

how they are used to establish a HACCP plan. Explain why the

temperature danger zone (TDZ) is important to food safety, and describe

common causes of food contamination, infections, and intoxications.

Describe the steps that managers should take when handling a food borne

illness complaint. Describe the important personal health and hygiene

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Revised: May 9, 2018

practices necessary in a food establishment, including hand washing.

Describe the menu planning and purchasing control points. Discuss

inventory controls, standards, and procedures at the receiving control

point. Summarize the A-B-C-D scheme of inventory classification,

perpetual and physical inventory systems, and other inventory control

measures. Explain what food service managers should know about the

issuing control point. List special food safety concerns, the riskiest food

products, and measures for reducing risks at the preparing control point.

Planning and Control for Food and Beverage

Operations

Brief Course

Description

Covers the principles and procedures involved in an effective food and

beverage control system, including standards determination, the operating

budget, cost-volume-profit analysis, income and cost control, menu

pricing, theft prevention, labor cost control, and computer applications.

Learning

Objectives/Outcomes

Identify differences and similarities between commercial and

noncommercial food service operations. Distinguish revenue centers from

support centers in hospitality organizations. Explain how control

procedures help managers assess operational results. Determine standard

yields for food products. Calculate standard portion costs and standard

dinner costs for food items on the basis of standard recipes and standard

portion sizes. Describe the importance and function of an operating budget

as a planning and control tool. Explain how a system of food service

control points helps managers carry out critical functions on a daily basis.

Identify factors that food and beverage managers should assess when

purchasing food products. Calculate an inventory turnover rate.

Distinguish a physical inventory system from a perpetual inventory

system.

Basic Hotel and Restaurant Accounting

Brief Course

Description

Provides a basis for understanding hospitality accounting concepts and

procedures, the processing of hospitality financial data, and the flow of

financial information in the accounting cycle that result in the production

of financial statements.

Learning

Explain the fundamental function and purpose of accounting, and

differentiate between bookkeeping and accounting. Explain the purpose of

15

Revised: May 9, 2018

Objectives/Outcomes generally accepted accounting standards, and describe the generally

accepted accounting principles (GAAP) covered in the text. Describe the

proprietorship, partnership, limited liability company, and corporate forms

of business organization and their advantages and disadvantages. Describe

the purpose of the basic financial statements prepared by hospitality

businesses, and explain when they are prepared. Identify the criteria that

determine whether a certified public accountant (CPA) is independent, and

describe the independent CPA's role in the preparation of financial

statements for external users. Describe the purpose of a chart of accounts

and its function in an accounting system. Identify and explain the technical

and long forms of the accounting equation. Identify the five major account

classifications, and describe the categories and common accounts within

each classification. Explain the perpetual and periodic inventory systems

and the bookkeeping accounts and accounting methods used in the

systems.

Supervision in the Hospitality Industry

Brief Course

Description

This course is designed to provide students with the principles of

supervision as they apply specifically to the hospitality industry.

Learning

Objectives/Outcomes

Identify fundamental supervisory responsibilities. Explain the steps that

supervisors can take to speak effectively on the job. Describe how

supervisors work with the human resources department to recruit new

employees. Explain the function of training within an organization and the

supervisor's role in training. Forecast business volume using the base

adjustment forecasting method and the moving average forecasting

method. Distinguish coaching from counseling and disciplining. Identify

the components of a progressive disciplinary program. List important laws

and legal concerns that affect hospitality supervisors. Describe issues

supervisors should be aware of as they assume the role of team leader.

Explain how supervisors can increase employee participation in

department activities.

16

Revised: May 9, 2018

Leadership and Management in the Hospitality

Industry

Brief Course

Description

This course is designed to acquaint students with leadership, management,

and quality issues facing today's hospitality industry. There are areas on

managing organizational change, traditional management roles and styles

versus leadership in the twenty-first century, quality management,

continuous improvement, power and empowerment, communication skills,

goal setting and coaching, high-performance teams, diversity, strategic

career planning, and ethics.

Learning

Objectives/Outcomes

List tips and cautions for organizations that embark on large-scale

organizational change, and describe the four major steps of the change

process. Describe the traditional functions of management (planning,

organizing, coordinating, staffing, directing, and controlling), and explain

why a gap exists between them and the actual behavior of managers.

Describe the dominant contemporary views of leadership. Summarize

William Edwards Deming's 14 points for management and describe his

ideas about leadership and management. Describe Joseph Juran' notions

and definitions of quality and detail the basic elements of quality

management using Juran's approach. Explain the four fundamental steps of

a continuous-improvement process, and identify and describe tools

commonly used in the process. Describe the types and sources of

organizational and personal power, the typical responses to each type of

power, and methods to enhance power and build alliances. Identify seven

myths about communication, outline the communication process, and

describe barriers to effective communication.

SECURITYAND LOSS PREVENTION MANAGEMENT

Brief Course

Description

This course provides a comprehensive introduction to reflect safety and

security issues of current concern within the hospitality industry. The

student will also be introduced to the best practices and guidance related to

risk management in the hospitality workplace. The course will also take a

broader and more global view of the issues, and focusses on identification

and mediation of a variety of safety and security concerns. Finally, the

program will incorporate lectures utilizing social media and professional

student presentations.

17

Revised: May 9, 2018

Learning

Objectives/Outcomes

Identify legal aspects of loss prevention. Be familiar with guestroom

security equipment. Know lodging safety equipment. Be familiar with

security procedures covering guests concerns. Understand departmental

responsibilities in guest and asset protection. Control emergency

management and media relations practices. Know the protection of funds.

Be fully versed in employee safety. Understand the issues related to

Insurance and Risk Management.

CONVENTION MANAGEMENT AND SERVICE

Brief Course

Description

This course provides students with the most current and comprehensive

coverage of the convention and meeting industry. With an in-depth look at

conventions and meeting marketing, selling to groups, and how to service

their business after the sale. Professional business presentations and

lectures will be incorporate into this module. The module is divided into

two components: The first half provides an overview of the industry and

discusses the methods used to reach and market to meeting planners. The

second half provides an in-depth look at how to manage the various

aspects of large group meetings and conventions, including registration;

group room blocks; convention security; the shipping, setting up, and

dismantling of exhibits; and the post-convention meeting.

Learning

Objectives/Outcomes

Understand the changing demographics, millennials. Understand the

increasing influence of meeting planners on a hotel’s sales and servicing

department strategies. Comprehend the development of a marketing plan.

Understand how to negotiate terms and creating the final contracts.

Organize and sell conventions sales. Sell to the association, corporate,

nonprofit and SMERF markets. Sell and advertise the service functions to

meeting planner. To understand how to prepare for the event, and deliver

the requirements of a convention. Full understanding of food & beverage

that is an integral part to the success of the conventions. Deliverables such

as the audiovisual requirements for conventions and meetings. How to sell

exhibits and trade shows. Detailed the procedures for convention billing

and post-convention review.

18

Revised: May 9, 2018

Hospitality Management: 1 Year-CO-OP

Brief Program

Description

These courses provide the crucial link between academia and the

global hospitality industry. They give students the applied, real-world

knowledge employers seek. The courses prepare students for entry-

level and upper-level hospitality management positions, as well as

specific technical and supervisory job skills employers’ demand.

Career Opportunities Entry Level Positions: Banquet Server, Cocktail Server, Food And

Beverage Server, Room Service Server, Bartender, Cafe Barista, ors,

Greeter, Host/Hostess, Bell Hop, Hotel Receptionist, Concierge, Front

Desk Agent, Housekeeping Cleaner, Building Maintenance,

Transportation Ticket Agent, Reservation Agent, Travel Clerk, Tour

Guide, Cruise Ship personnel.

Entry level Managerial to Mid-Management Positions:

Dining Room Supervisor, Shift Supervisors, Hospitality Coordinator,

Catering Coordinator and Hotel/Motel Assistant Manager.

The Benefit the student would derive: Would be prolonged exposure

to the positions available within the entry level Hospitality to Mid-

management levels within the Hospitality Industry.

Required Textbooks

'The Lodging and Food Service Industry,' 'Managing Front Office

Operations,' 'Managing Service in Food and Beverage Operations,'

'Hospitality Sales and Marketing,' 'Managing Housekeeping

Operations,' 'Planning and Control for Food and Beverage Operations,'

'Basic Hotel and Restaurant Accounting,' 'Supervision in the

Hospitality Industry,'

Other Materials

May vary per specific Co-op Placement requirements.

Program Duration 480 instructional hours and 480 hours of co-op placement, spread over

11.2 months.

Homework Hours

120 Hours.

Delivery Methods

Classroom (Instructor Led); workshops (Food Safe, Serving it Right)

19

Revised: May 9, 2018

Additional

Instructional Methods

Co-op Placement

Learning Objectives &

Outcomes

Students master the management and operational skills that make

hospitality and F&B properties thrive.

Student Progress/

Assessment Methods

Grades are composed of 4 elements: Final Examination, Assignments

and Quizzes, Class Participation, and Attendance. Course Outlines

will be provided first day of class. The final exam will consist of 100

multiple choice questions. Students who pass the final exam with a

score of 70% will receive a course certificate. Those who pass with a

score of 90% or higher, will receive a certificate that notes they passed

“with honours.”

Attendance

Expectations

Students will maintain a minimum of 80% attendance.

Graduation

Requirements

Maintain a 70% average on each of the 16 individual course

final exams; complete all exams, quizzes and assignments, as

well as participate in all discussions and activities

Successfully complete the Work Experience components

Maintain a minimum of 80% attendance throughout the

duration of the program

Food Safe

Serving it Right

Students must complete a co-op written report which must be

submitted within one-week of the completion of their co-op

placement. The student must receive a Satisfactory Grade (S)

to continue on receive formal credentials.

20

Revised: May 9, 2018

Individual Course Summaries

HOSPITALITY TODAY: AN INTRODUCTION

Brief Course

Description

This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the many entities

that make up the hospitality industry, as well as an overview of today’s

hot issues, including ethical challenges and management concerns.

There are numerous examples, exhibits, and statistics give students an

up-to-date look at the dynamic hospitality field. The module reflects

new industry trends, management practices and the effect of technology

and social media on various aspects of hospitality. Some current topics

are: boutique/lifestyle hotels, Airbnb, global distribution systems, event

technology, emotional labour and Internet advertising.

Learning

Objectives/Outcomes

Understanding how service makes the difference. Describe the scope of

the travel and tourism industry in the changing world. Cite

opportunities for education, training, and career paths and development

in the hospitality industry. Detailing hospitality organizations:

restaurants, hotels and management. Understanding how hotels are

organized and managed. Explain the organization of club management.

Introducing students to the meeting industry. Floating resorts: the cruise

line business. Describe the process of managing and leading hospitality

enterprises. Manage human resources and manage labour trends.

Understand the marketing of the hospitality industry. Detail how

management companies manage hotels. Understand how franchising

big business in hospitality is. Explain ethics in hospitality management.

Managing Front Office Operations

Brief Course

Description

This course presents a systematic approach to front office procedures by

detailing the flow of business through a hotel, from the reservations

process to check-out and account settlement. The course also examines the

various elements of effective front office management, paying particular

attention to the planning and evaluation of front office operations and to

human resources management. Front office procedures and management

are placed within the context of the overall operation of a hotel.

Learning

Objectives/Outcomes

Classify hotels in terms of their ownership, affiliation, and levels of

service. Describe how hotels are organized and explain how functional

areas within hotels are classified. Summarize front office operations

during the four stages of the guest cycle. Discuss the sales dimension of

21

Revised: May 9, 2018

the reservations process and identify the tools managers use to track and

control reservations. List the seven steps of the registration process and

discuss creative registration options. Identify typical service requests that

guests make at the front desk. Explain important issues in developing and

managing a security program. Describe the process of creating and

maintaining front office accounts. Identify functions and procedures

related to the check-out and account settlement process. Discuss typical

cleaning responsibilities of the housekeeping department.

Managing Service in Food and Beverage

Operations

Brief Course

Description

This course provides students with practical skills and knowledge for

effective management of food service operations. It presents basic service

principles while emphasizing the importance of meeting and, whenever

possible, exceeding the expectations of guests.

Learning

Objectives/Outcomes

Define "moments of truth" and identify staff members needed in a food

service operation. Summarize typical restaurant server and bus person

duties. List and discuss the tasks that banquet servers and room service

attendants perform. Describe the duties of beverage servers and

bartenders. Identify legal restrictions and liability issues affecting the

service of alcoholic beverages. Explain how to tell when guests are

intoxicated, and outline the steps to take when stopping alcohol service to

them. Describe the importance of the menu to food service operations and

explain how it is planned and designed. Identify procedures and issues

involved with purchasing, receiving, storing, issuing, and controlling food

service operation supplies and equipment. Summarize design, decor, and

cleaning issues for food service operations.

Hospitality Sales and Marketing

Brief Course

Description

This course is designed to provide students with a solid background in

hospitality sales and marketing. The main focus is on practical sales

techniques for selling to targeted markets.

Learning

Objectives/Outcomes

Distinguish marketing from sales and identify trends that affect marketing

and sales in the hospitality industry. Identify and describe the key steps of

a marketing plan. Summarize the duties and responsibilities of positions

typically found in a hotel marketing and sales office. Describe the five

22

Revised: May 9, 2018

steps of a presentation sales call. Explain the basics of effective telephone

communication and describe various types of outgoing and incoming

telephone calls related to the marketing and sales function. Describe

internal marketing and sales. Explain the role of advertising, public

relations, and publicity in reaching prospective guests. Summarize how

hospitality properties are meeting the needs of business travelers. Explain

how hospitality properties are meeting the needs of leisure travelers.

Describe travel agencies and the travelers they serve.

Managing Housekeeping Operations

Brief Course

Description

This course is designed to provide students with the principles of

housekeeping management as they apply specifically to the hospitality

industry.

Learning

Objectives/Outcomes

Identify the role of housekeeping in a hospitality operation. Explain how

to follow environmentally sound procedures for sustainable housekeeping.

Describe how to plan and organize the work of the hospitality

housekeeping department. Explain the role executive housekeepers play in

managing such human resource concerns as diversity, turnover,

recruitment, selection, training, scheduling, and motivation. Explain how

to manage inventories for linens, uniforms, guest loan items, machines and

equipment, cleaning supplies, and guest supplies. Describe how an

executive housekeeper budgets and controls expenses. Identify important

security concerns and the role that the members of the housekeeping

department play in creating a safe and secure property. Trace the flow of

laundry through an on-premises laundry and describe the function of each

machine.

Planning and Control for Food and Beverage

Operations

Brief Course

Description

Covers the principles and procedures involved in an effective food and

beverage control system, including standards determination, the operating

budget, cost-volume-profit analysis, income and cost control, menu

pricing, theft prevention, labor cost control, and computer applications.

23

Revised: May 9, 2018

Learning

Objectives/Outcomes

Identify differences and similarities between commercial and

noncommercial food service operations. Distinguish revenue centers from

support centers in hospitality organizations. Explain how control

procedures help managers assess operational results. Determine standard

yields for food products. Calculate standard portion costs and standard

dinner costs for food items on the basis of standard recipes and standard

portion sizes. Describe the importance and function of an operating budget

as a planning and control tool. Explain how a system of food service

control points helps managers carry out critical functions on a daily basis.

Identify factors that food and beverage managers should assess when

purchasing food products. Calculate an inventory turnover rate.

Distinguish a physical inventory system from a perpetual inventory

system.

Basic Hotel and Restaurant Accounting

Brief Course

Description

Provides a basis for understanding hospitality accounting concepts and

procedures, the processing of hospitality financial data, and the flow of

financial information in the accounting cycle that result in the production

of financial statements.

Learning

Objectives/Outcomes

Explain the fundamental function and purpose of accounting, and

differentiate between bookkeeping and accounting. Explain the purpose of

generally accepted accounting standards, and describe the generally

accepted accounting principles (GAAP) covered in the text. Describe the

proprietorship, partnership, limited liability company, and corporate forms

of business organization and their advantages and disadvantages. Describe

the purpose of the basic financial statements prepared by hospitality

businesses, and explain when they are prepared. Identify the criteria that

determine whether a certified public accountant (CPA) is independent, and

describe the independent CPA's role in the preparation of financial

statements for external users. Describe the purpose of a chart of accounts

and its function in an accounting system. Identify and explain the technical

and long forms of the accounting equation. Identify the five major account

classifications, and describe the categories and common accounts within

each classification. Explain the perpetual and periodic inventory systems

and the bookkeeping accounts and accounting methods used in the

systems.

24

Revised: May 9, 2018

Supervision in the Hospitality Industry

Brief Course

Description

This course is designed to provide students with the principles of

supervision as they apply specifically to the hospitality industry.

Learning

Objectives/Outcomes

Identify fundamental supervisory responsibilities. Explain the steps that

supervisors can take to speak effectively on the job. Describe how

supervisors work with the human resources department to recruit new

employees. Explain the function of training within an organization and the

supervisor's role in training. Forecast business volume using the base

adjustment forecasting method and the moving average forecasting

method. Distinguish coaching from counseling and disciplining. Identify

the components of a progressive disciplinary program. List important laws

and legal concerns that affect hospitality supervisors. Describe issues

supervisors should be aware of as they assume the role of team leader.

Explain how supervisors can increase employee participation in

department activities.

Hospitality Management: 6 Months-

CO-OP

Brief Program

Description

These courses provide the crucial link between academia and the global

hospitality industry. They give students the applied, real-world

knowledge employers seek. The courses prepare students for entry-level

and upper-level hospitality management positions, as well as specific

technical and supervisory job skills employers’ demand.

Career Opportunities

Entry level positions that can be attained are: Banquet Server, Cocktail

Server, Food And Beverage Server, Room Service Server, Bartender,

Cafe Barista, Greeter, Host/Hostess, Bell Hop, Hotel Receptionist,

Concierge, Front Desk Agent, Housekeeping Cleaner, Building

Maintenance, Maintenance Supervisor, Transportation Ticket Agent,

Reservation Agent, Travel Clerk, Tour Guide, Cruise Ship personnel.

25

Revised: May 9, 2018

Required Textbooks

'The Lodging and Food Service Industry,' 'Managing Front Office

Operations,' 'Managing Service in Food and Beverage Operations,'

'Supervision in the Hospitality Industry,'

Other Materials

May vary per specific Co-op Placement requirements.

Program Duration

240 instructional hours and 240 hours of co-op placement, spread over

5.6 months.

Homework Hours

60 Hours.

Delivery Methods

Classroom (Instructor Led); workshops (Food Safe, Serving it Right)

Additional

Instructional

Methods

Co-op Placement

Learning Objectives &

Outcomes

Students master the management and operational skills that make

hospitality and F&B properties thrive.

Student Progress/

Assessment Methods

Grades are composed of 4 elements: Final Examination, Assignments

and Quizzes, Class Participation, and Attendance. Course Outlines will

be provided first day of class. The final exam will consist of 100 multiple

choice questions. Students who pass the final exam with a score of 70%

will receive a course certificate. Those who pass with a score of 90% or

higher, will receive a certificate that notes they passed “with honors.”

Attendance

Expectations

Students will maintain a minimum of 80% attendance.

26

Revised: May 9, 2018

Graduation

Requirements

Maintain a 70% average on each of the 16 individual course final

exams; complete all exams, quizzes and assignments, as well as

participate in all discussions and activities

Successfully complete the Work Experience components

Maintain a minimum of 80% attendance throughout the duration

of the program

Food Safe

Serving it Right

Students must complete a co-op written report which must be

submitted within one-week of the completion of their co-op

placement The student must receive a Satisfactory Grade (S) to

continue on receive formal credentials.

Individual Course Summaries

HOSPITALITY TODAY: AN INTRODUCTION

Brief Course

Description

This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the many entities

that make up the hospitality industry, as well as an overview of today’s

hot issues, including ethical challenges and management concerns.

There are numerous examples, exhibits, and statistics give students an

up-to-date look at the dynamic hospitality field. The module reflects

new industry trends, management practices and the effect of technology

and social media on various aspects of hospitality. Some current topics

are: boutique/lifestyle hotels, Airbnb, global distribution systems, event

technology, emotional labour and Internet advertising.

Learning

Objectives/Outcomes

Understanding how service makes the difference. Describe the scope of

the travel and tourism industry in the changing world. Cite

opportunities for education, training, and career paths and development

in the hospitality industry. Detailing hospitality organizations:

restaurants, hotels and management. Understanding how hotels are

organized and managed. Explain the organization of club management.

Introducing students to the meeting industry. Floating resorts: the cruise

line business. Describe the process of managing and leading hospitality

27

Revised: May 9, 2018

enterprises. Manage human resources and manage labour trends.

Understand the marketing of the hospitality industry. Detail how

management companies manage hotels. Understand how franchising

big business in hospitality is. Explain ethics in hospitality management.

Managing Front Office Operations

Brief Course

Description

This course presents a systematic approach to front office procedures by

detailing the flow of business through a hotel, from the reservations

process to check-out and account settlement. The course also examines the

various elements of effective front office management, paying particular

attention to the planning and evaluation of front office operations and to

human resources management. Front office procedures and management

are placed within the context of the overall operation of a hotel.

Learning

Objectives/Outcomes

Classify hotels in terms of their ownership, affiliation, and levels of

service. Describe how hotels are organized and explain how functional

areas within hotels are classified. Summarize front office operations

during the four stages of the guest cycle. Discuss the sales dimension of

the reservations process and identify the tools managers use to track and

control reservations. List the seven steps of the registration process and

discuss creative registration options. Identify typical service requests that

guests make at the front desk. Explain important issues in developing and

managing a security program. Describe the process of creating and

maintaining front office accounts. Identify functions and procedures

related to the check-out and account settlement process. Discuss typical

cleaning responsibilities of the housekeeping department.

Managing Service in Food and Beverage

Operations

Brief Course

Description

This course provides students with practical skills and knowledge for

effective management of food service operations. It presents basic service

principles while emphasizing the importance of meeting and, whenever

possible, exceeding the expectations of guests.

Learning

Objectives/Outcomes

Define "moments of truth" and identify staff members needed in a food

service operation. Summarize typical restaurant server and bus person

duties. List and discuss the tasks that banquet servers and room service

attendants perform. Describe the duties of beverage servers and

bartenders. Identify legal restrictions and liability issues affecting the

28

Revised: May 9, 2018

service of alcoholic beverages. Explain how to tell when guests are

intoxicated, and outline the steps to take when stopping alcohol service to

them. Describe the importance of the menu to food service operations and

explain how it is planned and designed. Identify procedures and issues

involved with purchasing, receiving, storing, issuing, and controlling food

service operation supplies and equipment. Summarize design, decor, and

cleaning issues for food service operations.

Supervision in the Hospitality Industry

Brief Course

Description

This course is designed to provide students with the principles of

supervision as they apply specifically to the hospitality industry.

Learning

Objectives/Outcomes

Identify fundamental supervisory responsibilities. Explain the steps that

supervisors can take to speak effectively on the job. Describe how

supervisors work with the human resources department to recruit new

employees. Explain the function of training within an organization and the

supervisor's role in training. Forecast business volume using the base

adjustment forecasting method and the moving average forecasting

method. Distinguish coaching from counseling and disciplining. Identify

the components of a progressive disciplinary program. List important laws

and legal concerns that affect hospitality supervisors. Describe issues

supervisors should be aware of as they assume the role of team leader.

Explain how supervisors can increase employee participation in

department activities.

Food & Beverage Management

Brief Program

Description

These courses provide the crucial link between academia and the global

food and beverage industry. They give students the applied, real-world

knowledge employers seek. The courses prepare students for entry-level and

upper-level management positions, as well as specific technical and

supervisory job skills employers’ demand.

Career

Opportunities

Banquet Server, Cocktail Server, Food and Beverage Server, Room Service

Server, Bartender, Cafe Barista, Dining Room Supervisors, Greeter,

Hospitality Coordinator, Host/Hostess, Hotel Manager, Hotel Supervisor,

Food and Beverage Manager, Food and Beverage Assistant Manager, Food

and Beverage Controller

29

Revised: May 9, 2018

Required

Textbooks

Textbooks from AHLEI

(American Hotel & Lodging Educational Institute):

'Managing Service in Food and Beverage Operations',

'Managing Beverage Service',

'Food Safety: Managing with the HACCP System',

'Planning and Control for Food and Beverage Operations'

Program

Duration

240 instructional hours over 3 months.

Homework Hours

Depending on student

Delivery Methods

Classroom (Instructor Led)

Learning

Objectives &

Outcomes

Students master the management and operational skills that make F&B

properties thrive.

Student Progress/

Assessment

Methods

Grades are composed of 4 elements: Final Examination (50%), Assignments

and Quizzes (30%), Class Participation (10%) and Attendance (10%). The

final exam will consist of 100 multiple choice questions. Students who pass

the final exam with a score of 70% will receive a course certificate. Those

who pass with a score of 90% or higher, will receive a certificate that notes

they passed “with honours.”

Attendance

Expectations

Students will maintain a minimum of 80% attendance.

Graduation

Requirements

Students must achieve a minimum of 70% on each of the 16 individual

course final exams. Students must also maintain a minimum of 80%

attendance throughout the duration of the program and are expected to

complete all exams, quizzes and assignments, as well as participate in all

discussions and activities in order to obtain their diploma.

30

Revised: May 9, 2018

Course outlines

Managing Service in Food and Beverage

Operations

Brief Course

Description

This course provides students with practical skills and knowledge for

effective management of food service operations. It presents basic

service principles while emphasizing the importance of meeting and,

whenever possible, exceeding the expectations of guests.

Learning

Objectives/Outcomes

Define "moments of truth" and identify staff members needed in a food

service operation. Summarize typical restaurant server and bus person

duties. List and discuss the tasks that banquet servers and room service

attendants perform. Describe the duties of beverage servers and

bartenders. Identify legal restrictions and liability issues affecting the

service of alcoholic beverages. Explain how to tell when guests are

intoxicated, and outline the steps to take when stopping alcohol service

to them. Describe the importance of the menu to food service operations

and explain how it is planned and designed. Identify procedures and

issues involved with purchasing, receiving, storing, issuing, and

controlling food service operation supplies and equipment. Summarize

design, decor, and cleaning issues for food service operations.

Managing Beverage Service

Brief Course

Description

This course lays the groundwork for a basic understanding of beverage

service by explaining the beverage service process, describing the types of

positions commonly found in beverage operations, and focusing on such

beverages as beer, spirits, and wine. Included in the course are instructions

on responsible alcohol service, supervisory techniques, and procedures for

entry-level beverage service positions.

Learning

Objectives/Outcomes

Outline the process of beverage service. Describe the major types of

beverages establishments serve. Identify major beverage staff positions

and their responsibilities. Explain how establishments standardize brands,

abbreviations, and recipes for drinks. Describe how establishments ensure

safety and security for their staff members and guests. Identify the rituals

and procedures associated with beverage service. Explain how to serve

alcohol responsibly, recognizing legal restrictions, signs of intoxication,

and methods of intervention. Describe leadership styles and how to apply

them. Describe supervisory responsibilities such as communication,

31

Revised: May 9, 2018

human resource management, managing time, delegating tasks, and

controlling stress. Identify the basic ingredients of beer, how it is made,

stored, handled, and served.

Food Safety: Managing with the HACCP System

Brief Course

Description

Presents a systems approach to food safety that answers public health

concerns, reduces sanitation risks, and ensures satisfaction for food

establishment guests, staff members, and owners. Explains how to define

and implement sanitation quality, cost control, and risk reduction

standards in a food service operation.

Learning

Objectives/Outcomes

Define the term control points, and identify the ten control points in the

food service system. Identify the seven HACCP principles, and explain

how they are used to establish a HACCP plan. Explain why the

temperature danger zone (TDZ) is important to food safety, and describe

common causes of food contamination, infections, and intoxications.

Describe the steps that managers should take when handling a food borne

illness complaint. Describe the important personal health and hygiene

practices necessary in a food establishment, including hand washing.

Describe the menu planning and purchasing control points. Discuss

inventory controls, standards, and procedures at the receiving control

point. Summarize the A-B-C-D scheme of inventory classification,

perpetual and physical inventory systems, and other inventory control

measures. Explain what food service managers should know about the

issuing control point. List special food safety concerns, the riskiest food

products, and measures for reducing risks at the preparing control point.

Planning and Control for Food and Beverage

Operations

Brief Course

Description

Covers the principles and procedures involved in an effective food and

beverage control system, including standards determination, the operating

budget, cost-volume-profit analysis, income and cost control, menu

pricing, theft prevention, labor cost control, and computer applications.

Learning

Objectives/Outcomes

Identify differences and similarities between commercial and

noncommercial food service operations. Distinguish revenue centers from

support centers in hospitality organizations. Explain how control

procedures help managers assess operational results. Determine standard

yields for food products. Calculate standard portion costs and standard

32

Revised: May 9, 2018

dinner costs for food items on the basis of standard recipes and standard

portion sizes. Describe the importance and function of an operating budget

as a planning and control tool. Explain how a system of food service

control points helps managers carry out critical functions on a daily basis.

Identify factors that food and beverage managers should assess when

purchasing food products. Calculate an inventory turnover rate.

Distinguish a physical inventory system from a perpetual inventory

system.

School Policies

In order to ensure transparency and consistency in the relationship between SELC Career College and our

students, please familiarize yourself with the policies below. These policies guide our interactions with

our students and likewise let students know what our expectations of them are. You are always welcome

to speak with the Student Services Coordinator for clarification on any policy you are unsure of.

SELC Career College

Admission Policy and Procedures Purpose:

To ensure applicants who are accepted into SELC Career College Business Programs have the best

chances to succeed in their studies.

Policy:

We admit qualified students without discrimination with regard to race, color, creed, national or ethnic

origin, marital status, sexual preference, age, religion. Applicants should meet program prerequisites and

have sufficient financial support for his/her study in Canada.

Before entering into any kind of an agreement with SELC Career College, students are provided a copy of

our current Student Manual for their review, which will include the following policies:

I. Tuition and Refund Policy

II. Dispute Resolution/Grade Appeal Policy

III. Dismissal Policy

IV. Admissions Policy

V. Withdrawal Policy

VI. Attendance Policy

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Revised: May 9, 2018

VII. Program Outline

VIII. Work Experience Policy

IX. Language Proficiency Assessment Policy

X. Credit Transfer Policy

Procedures/Steps:

1. All applicants participate in a comprehensive admissions procedure to determine their

likelihood of being successful in the program of choice.

2. Inquiries are referred to who communicates with the candidates. A thorough assessment is

done through this process and students are provided a copy of the Student Manual, which

includes all policies as required by PTIB.

3. Evidence of Admission Requirements is confirmed by Senior Educational Administrator.

4. After receiving evidence that the prospective student meets all of the admission criteria

Marketing Team prepares a Letter of Acceptance and Letter of Support. These are forwarded to

the student for review.

5. The Marketing Team prepares the Student Enrolment Contract.

Procedures/Steps:

6. The Senior Educational Administrator and the student review the contract and the policies that

will affect the student during his/her completion of the program of study.

7. If necessary, the prospective student meets with Accounting to discuss and agree upon

financial arrangements for payment of tuition and other fees.

8. If the prospective student understands their rights and responsibilities, they then sign the

contract.. A copy of the signed contract is provided to the student and the original is placed in the

student file.

Postponement Policy

Please note that CIC regulations have established new study permit conditions requiring all

students to enrol in and actively pursue a course or program of study after arrival in Canada.

If a student would like to postpone their program they must notify the school in writing at least

14 days prior to the original starting date.

Acceptable reasons to postpone a program are as follows:

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1. Sickness or family emergency with valid documentation for either situation (example:

doctor’s certificate, etc.).

2. Visa delay with a copy of the confirmation of the application from CIC.

If the student does not have any proof as to why they would like to postpone their studies at

SELC Career College an administration fee of $150.00 will apply. Students are only able to

postpone once; however, the institution will make the decision as to whether the postponement

will be granted.

If the student does not come for their new start date of the program or requests an additional

postponement without a valid reason, SELC Career College reserves the right to cancel the

program that the student is enrolled in and will immediately report them to CIC Immigration.

Please note, deferrals are not automatic and the institution will make the decision as to whether

the postponement will be granted.

Attendance Policy

SELC Career College recognizes that good attendance is directly related to student success in completing

a program of study. The policy applies to all students who are currently enrolled or are enrolled at any

future time. Students registered for full-time study are scheduled to attend classes for twenty hours each

week.

Students are expected to attend all classes as scheduled. Students who will be absent must contact the

school either by telephone at 604-488-0780 or by email at [email protected] before the time

that they are scheduled to start class. The student is responsible for completing all assignments missed

during the absence. Minimum acceptable attendance is 80%.

Please note:

1. The Student Services Coordinator issues a warning letter to any student who has been absent

for 10% of scheduled classes.

2. The Student Services Coordinator meets with students who have been absent for 15% of

scheduled classes and places student on probation.

3. The Student Services Coordinator meets with students who have been absent for 20% of

scheduled classes and dismisses him/her from study.

4. The Student Services Coordinator sends a dismissal letter via Canada Post or email to any

student who has been absent for 5 consecutive scheduled school days without contacting the

school.

Students having difficulty meeting these attendance requirements should contact their Instructor.

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Leave of Absence / Vacation Policy

*All students must request a leave of absence in writing (using our Vacation Request Form) at least 6

weeks in advance. Approval will depend on the student’s current standing such as: attendance and grade

(minimum 85%), academic performance, length of enrollments etc.

•Maximum of 1 week vacation may be granted to the student. Vacations may only be taken

between the study and co-op part of the program.

•Vacations will not be approved during students study portion of the program. (1 or 2 days may

be considered with instructor approval)

•Requests for a leave of absence due to personal or family health related issues must be supported

by a medical certificate (i.e., doctor’s note). Without proper justification and supporting

documents, these requests will not be considered.

Code of Conduct and Dismissal Policy

SELC Career College expects students to meet and adhere to a code of conduct while completing a

program of study. The list below outlines the code of conduct that all students are expected to follow.

This list is not exhaustive and students should request clarification from the Student Services Coordinator

if they have any questions.

“Student” is defined as including prospective students as well as those currently registered or enrolled in

any SELC Career College programs or activity. The Code of Conduct students are expected to follow

includes:

Attend school in accordance with the Attendance Policy.

Treat all students and staff with respect.

Refrain from any disruptive or offensive classroom behavior. This includes any jokes or

comments that refer in a degrading manner to race, ethnicity, sexuality or religious

orientation.

Dress according to the school’s dress code as outlined in the Student Handbook.

Refrain from cheating or plagiarism in completing class assignments.

Treat school property with respect.

Refrain from bringing weapons of any kind (i.e. knives, guns) to school.

Complete all assignments and examinations on the scheduled completion dates.

Refrain from bringing any alcohol or any prohibited mood altering substances to the

school.

Any other conduct which is determined to be detrimental or damaging to the other

students, staff members or the school.

Any of the following, if substantiated, will result in immediate dismissal without a warning letter or

probationary period:

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Sexual assault.

Physical assault or other violent acts committed on or off campus against any student.

Verbal abuse or threats.

Vandalism of school property.

Theft.

Students who do not meet the expected code of conduct will be subject to the procedures outlined below

which may include immediate dismissal from the school depending on the severity of the misconduct.

Concerns related to a student’s conduct shall be referred to the Student Services Coordinator to process in

accordance with this Policy.

Procedure:

1. All concerns relating to student misconduct shall be directed to the Student Services Coordinator.

Concerns may be brought by staff, students or the public.

2. The Student Services Coordinator will arrange to meet with the student to discuss the concern(s)

within 5 school days of receiving the complaint. If the alleged conduct is of such a serious nature

that an Immediate dismissal may be warranted the Student Services Coordinator will meet with

the student as soon as practicable.

3. Following the meeting with the student, the Student Services Coordinator will conduct whatever

further enquiry or investigation is necessary to determine whether the concerns are substantiated.

4. Any necessary inquiries or investigations shall be completed within 5 school days of the initial

meeting with the student.

5. The Student Services Coordinator will meet with the student and do one of the following:

a) Determine that the concern(s) were not substantiated;

b) Determine that the concern(s) were substantiated, in whole or in part, and either:

i. Give the student a warning setting out the consequences of further misconduct;

ii. Set a probationary period with appropriate conditions; or

iii. Recommend that the student be dismissed from the Institution.

6. The Student Services Coordinator will prepare a written summary of the determination. A copy

shall be given to the student, a copy will be placed in the school’s Student File, and the original

will be placed in the student file.

7. If the student is issued a warning or placed on probation, the Student Services Coordinator and

the student both sign the written warning or probationary conditions and the student is given a

copy. The original document is placed in the student’s file.

8. If the recommendation is to dismiss the student, the Student Services Coordinator of the school

will meet with the student to dismiss him/her from study at the school. The Student Services

Coordinator of the school will deliver to the student a letter of dismissal and a calculation of

refund due or tuition owing, depending on the status of the student’s financial account with the

school.

9. If a refund is due to the student, the head of school will ensure that a cheque is forwarded to the

student within 30 days of the dismissal.

10. If the student owes tuition or other fees to the school, the head of the school will undertake the

collection of the amount owing.

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Bullying and Abuse Policy

SELC Career College has an ongoing commitment to guide students’ behavior towards appropriate and

acceptable social outcomes. The school has a zero tolerance on bullying and abuse.

Definition of Bullying: “Bullying” is defined as any unsought attention which results in physical,

emotional or moral discomfort of any kind. Bullying is repeatedly and persistently ‘hurting’ someone

over time.

Bullying can be in many forms. We consider the following behavior to be bullying:

Type Repeated Examples of:

Physical Hitting, kicking, punching

Pushing, shoving, spitting

Making rude gestures

Taking or damaging something which belongs to someone else

Pressuring others to hand over food, money or something which belongs

to them.

Coercing someone to do something they do not want to

General physical harassment

Verbal Name calling

Teasing

Threatening

Making fun of someone because of their appearance, physical

characteristics or cultural background

Making fun of someone’s actions

General verbal harassment

Social Excluding others from the game or group

Spreading untrue stories about others

Hiding or damaging property

Cyber Abusive texts and emails

Hurtful messages, images or videos

Imitating others online to set them up

Excluding others online

Nasty online gossip and chat

Indirect Standing by – a bystander

Anti-Bully Strategies

Discuss and display our Talk, Walk, Ask, Tell strategy.

Openly talk about bullying – what it is, how it affects us and what we can do about it.

Teach our students skills, which will build their resilience and self-esteem and empower them to

take the responsibility for themselves – and give them the opportunity to practice these skills; the

skills include the ability to communicate, be assertive, negotiate compromise and develop respect

and empathy.

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Use external programs to support the School’s policy (eg. Pink Shirt Day, Training for staff

members from WCB).

Support all students, and parents involved in any ‘bullying’ incidents and investigations with

subsequent affirmation strategies.

Responsibilities of Students

To report if they are being bullied or if they see someone being bullied

To help someone who is being bullied – be an active bystander

To not bully others

To develop resilience

If it happens to me:

TALK – say ‘No!, Stop!, I don’t want you to do that!’

WALK – If they persist in annoying or provoking you walk away and ignore them

ASK – If they still persist, face them and ASK them in a strong voice, “Why are you doing this? I

do not like that. Leave me alone!”

TELL – If they continue, walk away and TELL the first staff member you see. That adult will

then assist you

Do not retaliate with physical or verbal abuse;

Feel confident that an incident can be resolved;

Talk it over openly with your parents and teachers, they can help you make a decision;

Write a description of the events and give it to a staff member.

If it happens to someone else:

Tell the person to stop bullying;

Be a friend to the person being bullied;

Encourage them to inform someone;

Seek help. You can decide to do something about it;

Write a description of the event and give it to a staff member;

Talk it over with your teacher.

Responsibilities of Staff:

To model appropriate behavior at all times

To deal with all reported and observed incidents of bullying

To ensure that students are supervised at all times

To report incidents of bullying that occurs in the classroom

To continue to tell students to be assertive, to be able to negotiate and to compromise

To adopt positive classroom management strategies

Responding to Reported Incidences of Bullying:

When bullying incident is reported or observed on school property, SELC will use the following

sanctions:

Talk to the students involved about the incident and remind them that such behavior in not

acceptable. Comfort the victim and point out how he/she feels

Inform guardian of incident

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Warn the bully of the consequences of further incidences

Inform appropriate staff of the incident

Keep a record of the incident in the student file

If the bully continues, the Student Services Coordinator and Senior Educational Administrator

will speak to the student further. Non-compliance by the student after intensive support may

result in more serious consequences.

Health and Safety Policy

SELC Career College is committed to providing a healthy and safe working and learning environment for

all employees and students. The policy applies to all SELC Career College employees and students.

Procedure for Fire Safety:

1. The Director of Operations ensures that adequate fire suppression equipment is available as

needed throughout the campus and that all fire suppression equipment is inspected by a qualified

inspector at least annually.

2. The Director of Operations ensures that all employees receive training in the operation of the fire

suppression equipment and in the school fire evacuation procedures.

3. The designated institution safety officer is responsible for preparing and posting emergency exit

instructions route maps in each classroom at the campus with the exit from that room specifically

noted in a colored highlight.

4. In the event of a fire emergency, the Office Administrator will dial 911 and advise the fire

department of the location of the school. They will provide details of the type of fire (if known)

and the location of the fire within the campus.

5. The Director of Operations or Receptionist will advise all employees to evacuate the campus.

6. Instructors will escort their students to the start of Cambie Street ensuring that he or she takes the

class list with them. At the start of Cambie Street, instructors will check the students present

against the list of students in attendance that day and will immediately advise the Receptionist if

anyone is missing.

7. The Director of Operations or Receptionist will act as a liaison between fire officials and

students/employees during the emergency. If necessary, the Director of Operations will authorize

school closure.

8. No student or employee will re-enter the campus until the fire officials have authorized re-entry.

Procedure for Earthquake Safety:

1. The Director of Operations ensures that adequate precautions are taken throughout the campus to

ensure that injury due to falling or unstable items during an earthquake is limited. This may

include securing file cabinets to walls and providing lipped shelving for books or binders that are

located at or above head-level.

2. The Director of Operations ensures that all employees receive training in the school earthquake

evacuation procedures.

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3. The designated institution safety officer is responsible for preparing and posting emergency

instructions and exit route maps in each classroom at the campus with the exit from that room

specifically noted in a colored highlight.

4. In the event of an earthquake emergency, all staff and students will take cover and remain under

cover until the shaking stops.

5. When it is deemed safe to do so, the Director of Operations or Receptionist will advise all

employees to evacuate the campus.

6. Instructors will escort their students to the start of Cambie Street ensuring that he or she takes the

class list with them. At the start of Cambie Street, instructors will check the students present

against the list of students in attendance that day and will immediately advise the Front Desk

Administrator if anyone is missing.

7. The Director of Operations or Receptionist will act as a liaison between rescue officials and

students/employees during the emergency. If necessary, the Director of Operations will authorize

school closure.

8. No student or employee will re-enter the campus until the rescue officials have authorized re-

entry.

WORK EXPERIENCE Policy - Co-op Placement

1. SELC Career College provides guidance and relevant assistance to students with co-op

placements in Canada as part of their studies during co-op semesters that will alternate with

academic semesters (the co-op semester will not exceed 50% of the total program hours).

2. SELC Career College ensures that co-op placements provide an opportunity for its students to

enhance the skills learned throughout their program of study.

3. SELC Career College will ensure that co-op placements for its students are with employers who

are committed to introducing students to work related to their field of study.

4. SELC Career College works with co-op host companies to evaluate the student’s performance

during their co-op placement.

Procedure:

1. Co-op placements are sought through networking and direct contact with school staff, the

Placement Agency and/or by the student themselves. *All co-op placements must be paid.

2. When a possible co-op host company is identified, the Co-op Placement Officer or Placement

Agency contacts the potential host to assess the commitment and ability of the company to

enhance the student’s workplace skills. The Co-op Placement Officer or Placement Agency

explains the school’s expectations with respect to joint evaluation of student performance (SELC

Career College Co-op Site Inspection Form).

3. If the co-op host company is approved to accept co-op students, the host’s name and contact

information are entered on the school’s list of co-op host companies.

4. Before the student’s co-op start date, the Co-op Placement Officer or Placement Agency contacts

co-op host companies to discuss a possible placement and training plan. Interviews are arranged

by the Placement Agency or the students themselves.

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5. If the student is successful at the interview, either the Co-op Placement Officer or Placement

Agency will prepare the Student Co-op Placement Agreement Form and Co-op Placement

Agreement and Training Plan form. Either the Co-op Placement Officer or Placement Agency

Co-op Placement Officer meets with the student to sign these documents. The student then has

their co-op host company sign the Co-op Placement Agreement and Training Plan form, returns it

to the Co-op Placement Officer or Placement Agency and copies of the documents given to the

student and placed in the student’s file. The Co-op Placement Officer also advises the student’s

instructor of the placement dates.

6. The Co-op Placement Officer and/or Placement Agency notes the placement dates and plans a

contact schedule which should be done through phone calls to the co-op host company with a

minimum of one site visit within the period of the placement. However, if the student obtains a

co-op placement outside of Vancouver, phone calls will be considered an acceptable form of

evaluation. If the student is placed outside of British Columbia, the co-op host company should

also submit periodical reports of the student’s progress.

7. At the end of the co-op period, the Co-op Placement Officer or Placement Agency contacts with

the co-op host company to conduct an assessment of the student’s performance throughout the co-

op placement (SELC Career College Co-op Placement Host Evaluation form). Conference calls

may be considered acceptable as well. The assessment is designed to include the student’s

performance at the work site related to skills learned throughout the program of study. The

completed assessment is signed by the Co-op Placement Officer and the student’s supervisor

from the co-op host company. A copy of the assessment is given to the co-op host company. The

original assessment is placed in the student’s file.

8. After completion of the co-op placement the student will complete the SELC Career College Co-

op Student Feedback Evaluation form. The form is signed by the student and the Co-op

Placement Officer. The original is placed in the student’s file and the copy is given to the student.

Student Responsibilities:

Students must ensure that they provide the college with accurate and updated contact information,

which includes a telephone number as well as current home and email addresses.

Students must respond to a proposed interview within 24 hours of being notified of an

opportunity.

Students must follow the terms and conditions of the SELC Co-op Application Form.

The Co-op Placement Officer or Placement Agency must be notified at least 24 hours in advance

if a change in time or day is needed in order for the student to attend an interview.

Students who fail to show up for an interview with a prospective co-op host company without any

notification will be dismissed.

Students must be suitably prepared for the interview; this includes both appropriate clothing as

well as having conducted research on the related co-op host company and position.

Students must ensure that the information that they provide to SELC Career College and to the

prospective co-op host company is truthful and accurate; the college is not responsible for

consequences such as job loss if the student has lied on an application or to a co-op host

company.

Students must confirm in writing that they accept a particular co-op placement; however, a verbal

agreement will also be considered binding. This acceptance must be received within 24 hours of

co-op placement being made.

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Students must honour the contract that they sign with the co-op host employer and must complete

the contract dates as they have been agreed upon.

Exceptional Circumstances:

a) In cases where a student is fired from their co-op placement, senior management will investigate

the situation by speaking with both the co-op host company and the student. A report will be

placed both in the student’s file and in a general file for co-op placement dismissals. If the

student was rightfully fired, they will be dismissed from the program and they will receive a

refund in accordance with PTIB bylaws.

If the student was laid off or fired for questionable reasons, they will be permitted to remain in

the program and the relationship between the co-op host company and SELC Career College will

be reviewed.

b) In cases where a student quits their co-op placement, senior management will follow up with the

student as to why they made this decision. A report will be placed in the student’s file and a

decision will be made regarding the validity of the student’s decision. The student will be

dismissed from the program for breach of contract if the decision to leave the job is specious. A

refund will be made in accordance with PTIB bylaws in this case. If the student’s decision is

deemed to be valid, the student will continue with their studies and be assisted in finding another

co-op placement. Given the ongoing evaluations and monitoring done by the Co-op Placement

Officer, Placement Agency and co-op host company, however, a student who is dissatisfied with

their position would already have spoken to management at SELC Career College and every

effort will have been made to rectify the situation before a student makes the decision to quit.

c) In case a student is having difficulties finding a co-op placement, SELC Career College will

coach and provide resources through resumé building and interviewing skills. SELC Career

College will provide students with extra guidance to assist with a co-op placement.

Policy for repeating Modules

Should a student not pass a module he/she will need to repeat and pay a pro-rated rate for the module if

the student wishes to successfully graduate from the program.

Reasons for repeating a module may be one of the following:

Failure to complete one or more elements of the module (attendance, assignments, quizzes,

presentations, exams or similar).

Failure to pass one or more elements of the module (attendance, assignments, quizzes,

presentations, exams or similar).

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Program Module Exam Rewrites

Students in the Hospitality program who do not successfully pass their course final exam will be required

to take a rewrite exam for that course of study. There is no charge for this first rewrite. However, if

students fail the first rewrite, they are required to attempt a second rewrite and must pay a fee of $125.00.

If required, a third subsequent rewrite will cost students $250. Therefore, students have a maximum of

three chances to rewrite the exams. Please see the prices listed below for rewrite exams.

Students who fail the third rewrite are required to retake the course, pay the full course tuition fee, and the

cost of the textbook. Students may retake the course on campus, if it is possible within the courses

schedule. Students must successfully complete the retake course before they are eligible to start the co-op

term.

If the retake course does not occur within the courses schedule, students are required to attend a 6-week

self-study on campus with limited teaching support. The self-study hours must be equivalent to in-class

hours.

After retaking the course, students are still required to take the final exam and successfully pass with

70%.

If a student rewrites for the 3rd

time and fails, students will be required to retake the module in class, if the

rotation allows it, before their co-op starts. If the module doesn’t fall into rotation, before the student

starts their co-op, students are required to attend 6 weeks of self-study on campus with some teacher

support. Regardless of the students’ individual situation, students will pay for the module retake and for

the required new textbooks at a cost.

Dispute Resolution and Grades Appeal Policy

SELC Career College provides an opportunity for students to resolve disputes of a serious nature

and grades appeals in a fair and equitable manner.

The policy applies to all SELC Career College students who are currently enrolled or were

enrolled within the last year.

Hospitality Rewrite Exam Fees

1st Rewrite Free

2nd

Rewrite $125.00

3rd

Rewrite $250.00

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Only grades received on mid-term or final assessments may be appealed. Grades received for

assignments or weekly quizzes may not be appealed.

Procedure for Student Disputes:

1. When a concern arises, the student should address the concern with the staff member most

directly involved. If the student is not satisfied with the outcome at this level, the student should

put his/her concern in writing and deliver it to the Head Teacher. The student who makes the

complaint may be represented by an agent or a lawyer.

2. The Head Teacher will arrange to meet with the student to discuss the concern and desired

resolution within 5 school days of receiving the student’s written concern, or as soon as

practicable.

3. If the Head Teacher is absent or is named in the complaint, the Director of Marketing will be

responsible for making a determination regarding the student’s complaint.

4. Following the meeting with the student, the Head Teacher will conduct whatever enquiries and/or

investigations are necessary and appropriate to determine whether the student’s concerns are

substantiated in whole or in part. Those inquiries may involve further discussion(s) with the

student either individually or with appropriate (institution’s) personnel.

5. The necessary enquiries and / or investigations shall be completed no later than 10 school days

following the receipt of the student’s written concerns. The Head Teacher will do one of the

following within 10 days of receiving the student’s written concerns:

a) Determine that the student’s concerns are not substantiated; or

b) Determine that the student’s concerns are substantiated in whole or in part;

c) Determine that the student’s concerns are frivolous and vexatious.

The student and the institution’s personnel involved shall receive a written summary of the above

determination. A copy of all documentation relating to every student’s complaint should be signed by all

parties. A copy shall be given to the student, a copy will be placed in the school’s Student Conduct File,

and the original will be placed in the student file.

6. If it has been determined that the Student’s concerns are substantiated in whole or in part the

Head Teacher shall include a proposed resolution of the substantiated concern(s).

7. If the student is not satisfied with the determination of the Head Teacher, the student must advise

the Head Teacher within 48 hours of being informed of the determination. The Head Teacher will

immediately refer the matter to the Managing Director. The Managing Director will review the

matter and meet with the student within 5 school days.

8. The Managing Director of the institution shall either confirm or vary the determination of the

Head Teacher. At this point the School’s Dispute Resolution Process will be considered

exhausted.

9. If the issue is of a serious nature the Managing Director of the School may in his/her sole

discretion and cost, engage the services of a third party mediator to assist in the resolution of the

dispute.

10. Final written reasons for determinations offered by the school at each resolution stage will be

given to the student within 45 days after the date on which the student made the complaint.

Procedure for Grade Appeal:

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1. If a student is dissatisfied with the grade received for a mid-term or final course assessment and

can provide evidence that a higher grade is warranted he/she should discuss with his/her

instructor. The instructor will reconsider the grade and, if warranted, assign a different grade.

2. If the student is not satisfied with the outcome of his/her appeal to the instructor, he/she should

submit a written appeal to the Head Teacher.

3. The Head Teacher will obtain a copy of the mid-term or final assessment from the instructor and

will have the assessment re-marked by another instructor.

4. If the assessment achieves a higher grade on re-mark, the higher grade will be assigned to the

student. If the assessment achieves a lower grade on re-mark, the original grade will be retained.

5. If a grade appeal is reviewed by Head Teacher., the grade assigned following the re-mark and

review will be final and cannot be appealed further.

Refund and Withdrawal Policy

1. If the institution receives tuition from the student, or a person on behalf of the student, the

institution will refund the student, or the person who paid on behalf of the student, the tuition that

was paid in relation to the program in which the student is enrolled if:

(a) the institution receives a notice of withdrawal from the student no later than seven days

after the effective contract date and before the program start date;

(b) the student, or the student’s parent or legal guardian, signs the student enrolment contract

seven days or less before the program start date and the institution receives a notice of

withdrawal from the student between the date the student, or the student’s parent or legal

guardian, signed the student enrolment contract and the program start date; or

(c) the student does not attend a work experience component and the institution does not

provide all of the hours of instruction of the work experience component within 30 days

of the program end date.

2. The institution will refund the tuition for the program and all related fees paid by the student or a

person on behalf of the student enrolled in the program if the student is enrolled in the program

without having met the admission requirements and did not misrepresent his or her knowledge or

skills when applying for admission.

3. If a student does not attend any of the first 30% of the hours of instruction to be provided during

the contract term, the institution may retain up to 50% of the tuition paid under the student

enrolment contract unless the program is provided solely through distance education.

4. Unless the program is provided solely through distance education, if the institution receives a

notice of withdrawal from a student:

(a) more than seven days after the effective contract date and

i. at least 30 days before the program start date, the institution may retain up to

10% of the tuition due under the student enrolment contract, to a maximum of

$1,000.

ii. less than 30 days before the program start date, the institution may retain up to

20% of the tuition due under the student enrolment contract, to a maximum of

$1,300.

(b) after the program start date

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i. but before 11% of the hours of instruction to be provided during the contract term

have been provided, the institution may retain up to 30% of the tuition due under

the student enrolment contract.

ii. and after 10% but before 30% of the hours of instruction to be provided during

the contract term have been provided, the institution may retain up to 50% of the

tuition due under the student enrolment contract.

iii. No refund will be granted after 30% of the hours of instruction to be provided

during the contract term have been provided.

5. Unless the program is provided solely through distance education, if the institution provides a

notice of dismissal to a student and the date the institution delivers the notice to the student is:

(a) before 11% of the hours of instruction to be provided during the contract term have been

provided, the institution may retain up to 30% of the tuition due under the student

enrolment contract.

(b) after 10% but before 30% of the hours of instruction to be provided during the contract

term have been provided, the institution may retain up to 50% of the tuition due under the

student enrolment contract.

(c) No refund will be granted after 30% of the hours of instruction to be provided during the

contract term have been provided.

6. If the institution provides the program solely through distance education and the institution

receives a student’s notice of withdrawal or the institution delivers a notice of dismissal to the

student and:

(a) the student has completed and received an evaluation of his or her performance for up to

30% of the hours of instruction to be provided during the contract term, the institution

may retain up to 30% of the tuition due under the student enrolment contract, or

(b) the student has completed and received an evaluation of his or her performance for more

than 30% but less than 50% of the program, the institution may retain up to 50% of the

tuition due under the student enrolment contract.

7. The institution will refund fees charged for course materials paid for but not received if the

student provides a notice of withdrawal to the institution or the institution provides a notice of

dismissal to the student.

8. Refunds required under this policy will be paid to the student, or a person who paid the tuition or

fees on behalf of the student, within 30 days:

(a) of the date the institution receives a student’s notice of withdrawal,

(b) of the date the institution provides a notice of dismissal to the student,

(c) of the date that the registrar provides notice to the institution that the institution is not

complying with section 1 (c) or 2 of this policy, or

(d) after the first 30% of the hours of instruction if section 3 of this policy applies.

9. If an international student delivers a copy of a refusal of a study permit to the institution, sections

1(a), 1(b), 4,7 and 8 of this policy apply as if the copy of the refusal were a notice of withdrawal,

unless:

(a) the international student requests an additional letter of acceptance for the same program

that was the subject of the refusal of a study permit, or

(b) the program is provided solely through distance education.

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Privacy Policy

SELC Career College collects students’ personal information for the following reasons:

To maintain student records as required by PTIB

To maintain student records as required by SABC (accredited schools).

To keep students/graduates informed of activities at the school.

To issue T2202As in accordance with Canada Revenue Agency

Students’ personal information is not used for any other purpose.

For all career training programs:

SELC Career College retains the full student file for a period of seven (7) years following the

student’s withdrawal, dismissal or graduation.

After seven years, the full student record is destroyed using a secure destruction method.

SELC Career College uploads a copy of the students’ contract, transcripts and credential (if any) to an

approved third-party vendor. These records are retained for a period of fifty-five (55) years by the third-

party vendor.

Procedure for student access to the information on file:

1. Students wishing to access the information in the student file must make the request in writing.

2. The Senior Educational Administrator will meet with the student to review the file and will

provide copies of any document the student requests.

3. The student will pay $0.25 per page for the documents copied for him/her.

Procedure for authorizing release of information:

1. If a student wishes to authorize a third party to access information in his/her student file, he/she

must do so in writing.

2. The school will not release information to any person other than people authorized by the student

to access information unless required to do so by legislation, a subpoena, court order or if release

of information is necessary as part of an ongoing police investigation.

English Only Policy Policy:

SELC Career College is committed to providing top quality education to all students, local and

international in the English Language.

English must be spoken at all times on college property and at all college events. The policy applies to all

SELC Career College employees, teachers and students.

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Procedure:

If a teacher or administrative staff member hears a student speaking a language other than English, the

following actions will be taken:

FIRST OFFENCE: Verbal Warning. The student caught speaking his or her own language will

be reminded that they must speak only English on school property.

SECOND OFFENCE: Meeting. The second time a student is heard speaking his or her own

language in college; the student will have a conference/meeting with the Senior Educational

Administrator or Director of Operations to discuss the matter.

THIRD OFFENCE: Suspension. The third time a student violates the English Only Policy, he or

she will be suspended the following day.

Cheating and Plagiarism Policy

This policy is intended to promote and educate students about academic integrity, and to protect the

interests of students, faculty and the College. Cheating and plagiarism are violations of academic integrity

and are considered to be very serious academic offenses. They undermine the legitimacy of the academic

degrees awarded by the College and deny honest students of some of the rewards of their efforts.

1. DEFINITIONS:

1.1 Students’ Original Work:

All students must complete their own original course work and assignments. Unless otherwise

indicated by the teacher, students must assume that any course work or assignment is to be

completed individually and presented using their own original writing, including text, formulas,

diagrams, and calculations.

1.2 Plagiarism:

Plagiarism is submitting or presenting work in a course as if it were the student’s own original

and individual work done expressly for that course when, in fact, it is not. Plagiarism includes,

but is not limited to, the following:

a) Copying in whole or in part from published material, electronic sources or any material

that the student did not originate himself or herself without documenting the source in

accordance with a recognized academic or technical style guide. Plagiarism includes

copying, paraphrasing or summarizing text, information or ideas from sources without

proper documentation.

b) Copying of another student’s course work or assignment. A student who knowingly

permits his or her work to be copied is considered to be as guilty as the plagiarizer.

1.3 Cheating:

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Cheating includes, but is not limited to, the following:

a) Copying of another student’s work. Detection may occur during the test or examination

or during the evaluation of the test or examination. Anyone who knowingly permits his or

her work to be copied is considered to be as guilty as the cheater.

b) Possessing unauthorized material during a test or examination, regardless of whether the

student uses this material. Detection may occur during the test or examination or during

the evaluation of the test or examination.

c) Impersonating another person or being impersonated by another person at any test or

examination, or in connection with any other form of academic work.

d) Forging, altering or falsifying any academic record, or making use of any false record

whether the record is in print or electronic form.

1.4 Cheating and Plagiarism Review Committee:

The Cheating and Plagiarism Review Committee is made up of three members of the department

or discipline in which the offense occurred, with the membership to be determined by the

department or discipline. The Committee must include the teacher concerned or a substitute at the

teacher’s discretion. The Cheating and Plagiarism Review Committee, is responsible for

reviewing contested accusations of cheating and plagiarism offenses and determining if the

accusation of offense is justified or not.

2. Procedures:

At any point in the process the student may request advice and assistance from any member of the

College community e.g. the Student Advocate or another teacher.

At any point in the process the teacher may consult any member of the College community who is not

also on the Cheating and Plagiarism Review Committee e.g. other colleagues or administrators, etc.

2.1 Detecting and Reporting Cheating and Plagiarism:

2.1.1 The penalty for plagiarism or cheating is a grade of zero for that course work or assignment

without the possibility of revising that course work or assignment or preparing an alternate

assignment.

2.1.2 When a teacher has reason to believe that a student has cheated or plagiarized, the teacher

will explain to the student the reasons why the course work or assignment is seen as an academic

offense within ten working days of detecting the offense. If, after consultation with the student,

the teacher determines that cheating or plagiarism did not, in fact, occur then the work or

assignment may be re-marked and a grade assigned.

2.1.3 If, after consulting with the student (or if the student does not respond to the teacher), the

teacher remains convinced that the student cheated or plagiarized, then the teacher must complete

a Cheating and Plagiarism Report Form and submit this form, along with copies of all relevant

evidence relating to the offense, to the Administration’s office within fifteen working days of

detecting the offense or conferring with the student.

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2.1.4 The Administration office will record the offense and related evidence in the student’s file,

notify the student and inform the student of the serious nature of the offense. The office will

acknowledge to the teacher that the offense has been recorded in the student’s file.

2.2 Requesting a Review of a Cheating and Plagiarism Report:

2.2.1 A student who wishes to contest the accusation of offense must complete a Student Appeal

Form indicating why the student believes that the accusation of offense is not justified. This form

must be submitted to the Administration’s office within ten working days of the notification of

the offense. The Administration’s office will forward a copy of the Student Appeal Form to the

teacher and the Senior Educational Administrator in which the offense occurred. The

Administrator will forward the form to the department or faculty Cheating and Plagiarism Review

Committee. (Note: The communication may take place electronically and via internal mail.)

2.2.2 Upon receipt of the Student Appeal Form, the Cheating and Plagiarism Review Committee

will arrange for a review of the accusation of offense and related evidence. The teacher will be

allowed to present the reasons for the accusation of offense and the student will be allowed to

present the reasons for contesting the accusation of offense in person or in writing to a meeting of

the Review Committee. The student may be accompanied by another member of the college (e.g.

the Student Advocate/Teacher) to any meeting with the Cheating and Plagiarism Review

Committee if they so choose.

2.2.3 The meeting and deliberations by the Review Committee must be held in confidence and

completed within ten working days of the receipt of the Student Appeal Form by the Cheating

and Plagiarism Review Committee. If the review request is received later than fifteen working

days after the last day of class of the current semester then the Review Committee may hold its

meetings and deliberations within ten working days after the start of the following semester. In

cases involving graduating students, every effort will be made to complete the process as quickly

as possible.

2.2.4 Following its deliberations and final decision, the Cheating and Plagiarism Review

Committee will inform the Administration’s Office, Senior Educational Administrator, the

teacher and student of its decision in writing within five working days.

2.3 Appeals:

There is no appeal of the Cheating and Plagiarism Review Committee’s decision. However, the

Senior Educational Administrator can require the Committee to review the case again if it is

demonstrated that the committee did not follow procedures.

2.4 Disciplinary Action, Information Provision, and Record Keeping:

2.4.1 If there is no contest of the offense or if the offense is upheld by the Cheating and

Plagiarism Review Committee, then the offense report and related evidence will remain recorded

in the student’s college file until graduation. If the accusation of offense is overturned by the

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Cheating and Plagiarism Review Committee, then the offense report and related evidence will be

removed from the student’s file and destroyed.

2.4.2 If there is a subsequent instance of a cheating or plagiarism offense, the Registrar will refer

the case for disciplinary action to the Senior Educational Administrator or Managing Director.

The disciplinary action may include suspension, expulsion or other appropriate penalties. In the

case of expulsion, appeals can be made to the Managing Director. The Managing Director will

meet with the student and make a final decision on disciplinary action. Any disciplinary action

will be recorded in the student’s file.

2.4.3 It is the responsibility of all faculty members to inform their students of the importance of

this policy and the meaning and consequences of cheating and plagiarism. All course outlines

should include a statement on the importance of this college policy and the consequences of

cheating and plagiarism.

3. Additional Policy on Cheating:

Resource materials for examinations, tests and assignments: Teachers should indicate what resource

materials students are permitted to use during an in-class examination or test prior to the start of the test

and ensure that students understand the consequences of cheating on college examinations and tests.

Teachers should be vigilant about the misuse of electronic devices during in-class examinations and tests.

If students can collaborate on out-of-class examinations or assignments then this should be indicated by

the teacher when the examination or assignment is provided to the students, otherwise students must

complete the examination or assignment individually.

a) Cheating detected during an in-class examination or test: If cheating is detected during an in-class

examination or test, the teacher may follow one of two options:

Option 1.

The teacher removes the examination or test material and any suspect material from the student and

asks the student to leave the examination or test. The teacher will complete a Cheating and Plagiarism

Report Form for this offense following the examination or test, and include copies of the materials in

question. The Cheating and Plagiarism Report Form should briefly but clearly indicate why the

teacher believes the student was cheating during the test or examination and attach copies of relevant

material. In the event of a review, the teacher may introduce new evidence not included in the initial

Report to the Managing Director. If a review or appeal of the accusation of offense overturns the

accusation of offense then the student may be permitted to complete a make-up examination or test as

appropriate.

Option 2

The teacher removes any suspect material from the student and allows the student to complete the test

or examination. After the test or examination, the teacher consults with the student. If the teacher

remains convinced that the student has cheated, the teacher assigns a grade of zero to the test or

examination and completes a Cheating and Plagiarism Report as indicated in Option 1. If the

accusation of cheating is later overturned, the teacher can grade the original test or examination

instead of giving a make-up test/examination.

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b) Cheating detected following an in-class examination or test or in an out-of-class test or

assignment: If cheating is detected following an in-class examination or test or in an out-of-class

test or assignment, then the teacher should complete a Cheating and Plagiarism Report Form for

this offense and include copies of the materials in question. The Cheating and Plagiarism Report

Form should briefly but clearly indicate why the teacher believes the student was cheating and

attach copies of relevant material. If the committee overturns the teacher’s decision, then the

student’s examination or test will be graded or the student will be permitted to complete a make-

up examination or test as appropriate.

Official document requests

All official document requests (graduation certificates, transcripts, letters of attendance) can be

made either through the Front Desk or by online request. If online request is chosen, request a

form by email at: [email protected].

All official documents can take up to two weeks to process. SELC Career College cannot

guarantee that documents will be ready in less time than that.

Each student will receive ONE official graduation certificate and ONE official transcript

upon graduation. If a student loses these documents and needs a replacement, he/she should

contact Student Services at: [email protected]. The price of replacement copies is:

ordinary mail $10.00, express $20.00 per document.

A student will receive an email once the documents are ready. The documents can either be

picked up at SELC or sent to the address that the student has provided.

SELC Career College will not issue graduation certificates or any document to a student who has

not completed his/her program. Thus, if a student is dismissed from SELC Career College, the

student is not eligible for a graduation certificate. Documents are not issued to a student who is

in the process of finishing his/her program. Official documents are only issued to a student who

has actually COMPLETED his/her program.

SELC Career College may hold formal graduation on a quarterly basis. Students will receive an

official invitation from the SEA once they have reached all the graduation requirements for the

program. Students should notify Student Services if they would like to attend graduation.

Finances

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You will need to open a chequing account so that employers can pay you by ‘direct deposit.’ You are free

to open an account at any bank (Bank of Montreal, TD Canada Trust, CIBC, etc.). However, the school

does recommend choosing a major bank as they are more likely to have branches in smaller towns.

TD Canada Trust, 1055 Dunsmuir St. (at Burrard St.) PH: 604-659-

2070

CIBC, 400 Burrard Street, Vancouver, PH: 604-665-1645

Bank of Montreal, 595 Burrard Street, Vancouver, PH: 604-665-6614

Royal Bank of Canada, 1025 W. Georgia St. (at Burrard St. in Royal Centre Mall)

Ph.: 604-665-6191

Social Insurance Number:

Any person hoping to work in Canada must have a SIN. You will need: an application form, your

passport and your study and work permits. SIN cards are obtained at Services Canada, 1st floor at the

Sinclair Centre, 757 W. Hastings Street, Vancouver.

Vancouver Information

The City of Vancouver is separated into a number of districts. Most of the attractions associated with

Vancouver are in these districts. These don't correspond to the legal divisions of the city, but instead are a

convenient way of sub-dividing Vancouver for travelers.

City Centre - the Downtown peninsula includes the West End, Yaletown, Gastown, Chinatown

and Stanley Park.

Kitsilano - the "young urban professional" neighbourhood, which is right next to the Point Grey

neighborhood.

Vancouver South - a mostly residential area, that includes the Kerrisdale, Dunbar, Oakridge and

Marpole neighbourhoods.

UBC - University of British Columbia and the surrounding area.

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East Van - a working class area; Commercial Drive is the bohemian part of town, Main Street is

an up and coming artsy part of the city.

Areas of Greater Vancouver include:

North Shore - the area north of the Burrard Inlet, including District of West Vancouver, City of

North Vancouver and District of North Vancouver.

Burnaby - separate municipality with a number of parks, including three of the larger GVRD

Parks (Central, Burnaby Lake, and Deer Lake). Also contains Metrotown, the largest shopping

mall in British Columbia.

New Westminster - a separate municipality (previously the province's capital). Has a park,

shopping mall (Royal City Mall) and a number of Victorian-style houses in the older parts of

town.

Richmond - a separate municipality with many restaurants and shopping opportunities, and home

to Vancouver International Airport, comprising the larger Lulu Island and Sea Island.

Surrey - Vancouver's largest suburb, easily reached on Translink by taking the Skytrain.

Coquitlam - an emergent suburb Northeast of Burnaby, becoming largely populated by new

Vancouverites and mid-class immigrant residents. Naturally set with local trails, parks, hills,

Coquitlam is the emerald spot of greater Vancouver.

Public Transportation

In Vancouver, there are 3 methods of public transport: Bus, West Coast Express Rail, SkyTrain

and SeaBus.

Planning your trip on public transit: go to www.translink.ca: Trip planner

(604) 953-333

Fare Zone Map

Your fare is determined by your mode of travel, time of day, and how many zones you travel in.

Buses are a one-zone fare, all day, every day, while Sky Train and Sea Bus require a one-, two-,

or three-zone fare, depending on the time of day and number of geographical zone boundaries

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you cross during your trip. After 6:30 p.m. on weekdays and all day Saturday, Sunday, and

Holidays, travel across the entire Metro Vancouver region only requires a one-zone fare. A

single fare is valid for 90 minutes. If you pay cash or use a Fare Saver (no longer sold) on the

bus, you’ll need to purchase a Compass Card or Compass Ticket when you transfer to West

Coast Express Rail, SkyTrain or Sea Bus.

How to Use Your Compass Card

Using your Compass Card is easy. Simply tap in when you start your journey and tap out when

exiting or transferring. Remember, buses are tap in only, so there's no need to tap out when

exiting. When you tap out, the system calculates the fare zones you've travelled and charges you

the correct fare. This applies to all products, including Monthly Passes. Card readers are located

at all West Coast Express Rail, SkyTrain and SeaBus fare gates. In order to pay the lowest fare

and transfer seamlessly across all modes of travel purchase a Compass Card and load it with

Stored Value, a DayPass, or a Monthly Pass.

Visit Compass page at http://www.translink.ca/en/Fares-and-Passes/Compass-Card.aspx to learn

more about all the benefits Compass offers.

You may also buy your Compass Card at Waterfront Station or London Drugs.

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Single Fares & Compass Tickets

Regular Fares Zone Adult Price Concession Price

1 Zone $2.85 $1.80

2 Zone $4.10 $2.80

3 Zone $5.60 $3.80

Weekdays after 6:30 p.m. and all day Saturday, Sunday and Holidays.

Unlimited Travel

Monthly Passes provide unlimited travel on SkyTrain and SeaBus within the number of

zones purchased. Monthly Pass holders must still tap in/out on rail and SeaBus to

ensure they're charged the correct fare. A Monthly Pass of any kind provides unlimited

travel on buses at any time, and across all zones on all modes on weekends, statutory

holidays, and after 6:30 p.m. on weekday evenings.

Monthly Pass Adult Price

Concession

Price *

1-Zone $93 $53

2-Zone $126 $53

3-Zone $172 $53

Planning Trips

Zone Adult Price Concession Price

All Zones $2.85 $1.80

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If you are travelling a long distance as a group, or if you are traveling alone, taking the bus makes a lot of

sense. Vancouver has several bus-friendly transportation options for the traveler for extended trips.

Greyhound Canada Transportation Corp is Canada's largest motor coach transportation company.

It provides transportation for passengers and packages to over 1100 communities, serving

Nanaimo on Vancouver Island, and Squamish, Whistler, and Pemberton, BC.

http://www.greyhound.ca/en/

International Stage Lines: is the Premier Charter Motor coach Company for the Pacific

Northwest, to -anywhere in BC, Alberta, and to all USA destinations. http://www.islbus.com/

Pacific Coach Lines: offers services between Vancouver (Downtown, Vancouver International

Airport and Cruise Ship Terminal) and Victoria, BC via BC Ferries.

http://www.pacificcoach.com/

Via Rail: is Canada's national passenger railroad. It offers year round trains between Vancouver

and Jasper, Edmonton, Winnipeg, Toronto and other major cities in central and eastern Canada.

www.viarail.ca

Car Rentals

When you need a rental car, it's a good idea to consider several factors while making a reservation to help

make your trip more enjoyable. Rates are often a key consideration in the reservation of your car, but

there are other factors that are important to consider as well. You should also consider how quickly you

can obtain your rental car, the vehicle/model and its condition, the convenience of returning your car

rental, the hours of operation and the availability of emergency road service.

There are many different car rentals in Vancouver, such as Enterprise Car Rental, Budget, Alamo, Hertz,

National, Discount and so on. Unless you need your car immediately upon arrival, it is strongly

recommended that you don’t rent your car at the airport, since you will have to pay some “airport fees.”

Tips:

Be sure and fill your car up before you return your car. In most cases you will pay a high

premium if you forget.

Besides needing a valid driver’s license and credit card in the same name, most large agencies

require renters to be at least 25 years old (smaller local companies have a minimum age of 21).

Most rental car agencies accept only major credit cards and do NOT accept debit cards or cash

Many car companies will provide you with an EXTRA KEY if you ask for one.

Be sure you get a MAP and look at it before you take off in your rental car. If you need to ask

questions do so before you leave the agency.

Health and Dental Care

Medical Care

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Health care is expensive in Vancouver and if you are absent from class for health reasons, you are

expected to bring a doctor’s note. Here is some information to assist you should you have a medical

complaint:

Walk-In Clinics

Vancouver has an excellent network of walk in medical health care clinics where you can see a physician

seven days a week without an appointment. Here is a list of the best medical and health care clinics in

Vancouver and the North Shore. Clinic visits cost about C$100.

Ultima Medicentre University Village Medical Clinic Plaza Level, 1055 Dunsmuir St 228-2155 Allison Rd.

Vancouver Vancouver, BC

Ph.: 604-683-8138, Ph.: 604-222-2273

Hours: 8-5 M-F

Yaletown Medical Clinic Granville Medical Clinic 1296 Pacific Blvd. 2578 Granville St.

Vancouver, BC Vancouver, BC

Ph.: 604-633-2474 Ph.: 604-733-4700

Hours: M-F 9-8:30; S-S 10-5:30 Hours: M-F 9:00 Am - 9:00 PM;

Sat-Sun 10:00 AM - 4:00 PM

Kitsilano Medical Clinic Kits Medical Clinic 2689 W. Broadway 206-2678 W. Broadway

Vancouver, BC Vancouver, BC

Ph.: 604-731-9187, Ph.: 604-737-2699,

Hours: M-F 8-8:4; Sat-Sun 9-8:45 Hours: M-F 9-5

Dental Care

East Side Walk-In Dental Clinic - Free pain relief only (extractions, open and drain and antibiotics,

basic restorative work) 455 East Hastings Street, Vancouver, BC Ph.: 604 254 9900

Reach Clinic - 10% reduction in fees; 6 week wait list. Examinations, preventative, periodontal therapy,

restorative, extractions, prosthodontics. 1145 Commercial Drive, Vancouver, BC Ph.: 604 254 1331

UBC - Emergency Clinic - Fillings, extractions, drainage of abscesses. $20-$50. Make appointment 2

working days ahead of time. 2199 Westbrook Mall, UBC, Vancouver, BC Ph.: 604 822 6917

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Mental Health

Moving to another country, no matter for how long, can be very stressful, especially when moving away

from a support network of friends and family. If you feel that you are not coping, feeling anxious,

depressed or any other emotions, then there is a clinic available that offers free counseling.

Surrey Counseling and Education Clinic - Open: Tuesdays 5:30 – 8:30 pm & Wednesday’s 5:30 – 8:30

pm. Two temporary locations: SFU, Burnaby Campus, Maggie Benston Building (T) & SFU Surrey

Campus (W) To book an appointment for an intake interview, please leave a message: SFU Counseling

Referral Line: 778-782-3519

Master’s level Counseling Psychology students provide free counseling in Vancouver as part of their

training. Since this is a training clinic, all counseling sessions are required to be videotaped/observed.

This clinic caters to people who are:

Adolescents, adults, older adults

People from diverse backgrounds

Students (secondary school, post-secondary, mature students)

Some of the issues that can be addressed are:

Grief, loss, and bereavement

Depression, anxiety, and stress

Transitions (school, moving, retirement)

Cultural issues (cultural identity, international students, and acculturation)

Phone Information

Public phones are widely available. A local phone call costs 25 cents. If you

don't have coins, you can dial 0 to call collect (i.e., ask

the person you are phoning to pay for the call). The

cost of a long-distance call from a public phone varies

with the duration and destination of the call.

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CELL PHONE/MOBILE PHONE

If you brought your mobile phone it must be TRI BAND otherwise it will not work on the Canadian and

US networks. If the phone is locked you can try getting it unlocked at a few of the stores around the city

that have ‘phone unlocking’ signs at the door.

There are a few major networks including Fido, Freedom, Solo Mobile, Koodo Mobile, Rogers, Virgin

Mobile and Bell. All of them offer different packages for different needs, as well as pre-paid phone cards

for around $25 - $40 and a choice of options for refilling. These networks have coverage all across

Canada and the US. They also offer the option of text messaging in Canada, the US and internationally.

Wireless Wave has convenient locations and sells five (5) different phone provider options. They have

pre-paid and monthly plans available, including 1 year plans as well. Sometimes it may be cheaper to

purchase a basic phone rather than using your own. You can always sell it when you’re done with it too.

You may be able to negotiate free or discounted prices for SIM cards when signing up for 1 year plans or

if you and your friends all sign up together.

Locations: Pacific Centre

700 West Georgia Street

at Georgia St and Granville St.

Cell Phone Options Contracts with a Monthly Plan:

If you choose a monthly plan, you will pay a flat monthly fee for a given amount of minutes each month.

The total cost for your service each month will also include a 911 service fee, taxes and may include a

monthly service fee to connect you to the network. Please note that if you exceed the amount of monthly

minutes and/or text messages set by the plan then additional fees will be charged.

Prepaid Options (*Note: you will have to provide your own phone!):

7-11, Fido and other phone carriers offer pre-paid phone plans. If you will not be talking very much on

your phone this may be the best option.

Contract Notes

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Remember: If you choose to sign a contract with a company, then don’t forget to ask them how to GET

OUT of the contract. Ask them what you will have to pay if you want to cancel the contract, how much

notice you will need to give them, how you can cancel your contract and so on.

If you think that you are willing to commit to a contract, there are a few things that you may want

to know and consider.

The minimum contract period for cellphone service is usually one year, but can be as long as

three years.

Committing to a contract means that you are obligated to pay for services from that provider for

the amount of time specified on the contract. Breaking a contract is costly (usually $20-$30 per

month remaining on your contract).

Along with a monthly fee for a plan with a set amount of minutes, there may also be monthly fees

for access to the network plus 911 service.

When you commit to a contract, you may receive a phone free of charge, or at a reduced cost.

You can get brand new phones for as cheap as $50 sometimes.

The service provider may include certain features as a bonus or at a reduced cost often for a

limited period of time for committing to a contract.

Make sure that you know how long the contract is for. Ask if you can break the contract and whether you

can change your plan during your contract period. If you are not comfortable with the contract terms, do

not commit. There is a very helpful website:

http://www.cic.gc.ca/epic/site/oca-bc.nsf/en/h_ca02207e.html

that provides information on various topics, like cell phone information; Canadian Consumer Handbook

(your rights as a consumer); privacy and identity protection; scams/fraud and so on.

Calling Home or Overseas

In convenience stores all over the country you will see the walls covered in posters advertising loads of

countries and rates. Look up which country has the most number of minutes to call your country. You can

usually buy $5, $10 or $20 long distance calling cards. This is by far the cheapest way to call home.

NOTE: Use a pay phone, not your cell phone to make the call as you will still be charged on your cell as

well as on the calling card.

Phone Codes:

Almost all of the phone numbers in the large Greater Vancouver area are local calls.

If you're calling from outside North America, you can dial directly to BC phones:

o (00)+ 1, and the number you wish to reach. e.g. 001-778-840-8241 (That number gets

you to Vancouver Corporate Interns office)

If you're calling from within Canada or the United States:

o dial 1 + area code + phone number. It looks like this e.g. 1-604-555-1212 (That number

gets you to BC's telephone number directory information line)

International Calling Cards:

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The best way to make long distance or international phone calls is to purchase a calling card. These can

be bought from most convenience stores (like a 7/11).

www.callingcardsnetwork.com provides information on these prepaid calling cards, and several available

options, and rates.

Things to see and do in and around

Vancouver

There's a range of things to do in Vancouver. Aside from natural beauty, Vancouver has a laid-back

charm that makes it one of the most popular Canadian cities to visit. From museums to hiking trails,

Vancouver has a wide range of activities and attractions for visitors.

Stanley Park Covering 1000 acres, Vancouver's Stanley Park is a downtown sanctuary that

offers city dwellers and visitors a multitude of indoor and outdoor activities. The

park features an 8.8 km (5.5 mile) seawall that runs the perimeter and provides a

perfect flat, paved path for rollerblading, biking, jogging and hiking. In addition, a

petting farm, the Vancouver Aquarium and oodles of other recreational facilities

are in Stanley Park

Vancouver Art Gallery Convenient to Robson Street shopping and right next door to the Fairmont Hotel

Vancouver, the Vancouver Art Gallery features historic and contemporary

international and Canadian art with an emphasis on BC's artistic heritage. Don't

miss the works of Emily Carr, a cherished West Coast artist who depicted the

landscape and villages of the First Nations cultures of BC.

Granville Island Located at the edge of downtown Vancouver, this 37-acre island was once an

industrial area but today is a charming destination for shoppers and culture seekers.

Granville Island features a wonderful public market, many artsy shops and

galleries, a theater, restaurants, a brewery and hotel. Granville Island is open year-

round and is free to visit.

Vancouver Aquarium Visit Canada’s largest aquarium, the Vancouver Aquarium, which houses more

than 70,000 animals in 116,000 sq. ft. of facility space. Open daily, the aquarium

charges an admission but profits go toward supporting its mission to conserve

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aquatic life. Translink Bus and Skytrain public transit operates year-round.

English Bay English Bay is located in the West End of downtown Vancouver. This waterside

neighborhood is at once lively and quaint and a great spot to walk around, shop or

have a drink. The main crossroads are Davie and Denman streets. Don't miss

watching the sun set at the Boathouse Restaurant while enjoying a Bloody Caesar

or a glass of BC wine and dinner at popular Bin 941 on Davie Street.

Grouse Mountain Just a 20 minute drive out of downtown Vancouver, Grouse Mountain is a

year-round destination for people looking for adventure or a just a great view.

Ambitious people can tackle the Grouse Grind - a 2.9 km hike straight up the

face of Grouse Mountain. Grouse Mountain is also a ski hill in winter, with

26 runs that offer a variety of terrain. Other attractions include the Grouse

Mountain Sky ride, ice skating, snowshoeing, helicopter rides, a conservation

centre, a top-of-the-mountain restaurant and more. Capilano Suspension Bridge is only 10 minutes away

and on the same bus route. The two work well together as a day's worth of Vancouver adventure.

Capilano Suspension Bridge The Capilano Suspension Bridge is more than just a bridge; there's actually a whole

park with activities, history and culture. The park is a 20 minute drive outside of

downtown Vancouver. Built in 1889, the Capilano Suspension Bridge stretches 450

feet (137m) across and 230 feet (70m) above Capilano River. The park offers guided

nature tours, the Kids' Rainforest Explorer program and Living Forest exhibit.

Robson Street Robson Street is a popular shopping street in downtown Vancouver that has a

good array of trendy shops for young people, such as American Eagle Outfitters,

Guess, and Bebe, plus more upscale offerings, such as Armani Exchange.

Robson Street is near the Fairmont Hotel Vancouver and also boasts numerous

restaurants, including Milestones, Tsunami Sushi, Joe Fortes Seafood & Chop

House, numerous Indian food restaurants and more.

Granville Street Granville is a popular entertainment and retail district. Scores of bars, dance clubs,

restaurants, hotels, and shops with neon lights and urban gritty vibe are open until

late into the night.

Yaletown

Yaletown is a historic warehouse district on the edge of downtown Vancouver

on False Creek. The area was gentrified in the 1980's and now has a hip, edgy

feel, with a mix of residential, business, office, restaurants, boutiques, cafes,

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services and more. Try visiting Yaletown around noon or in the evening when cafes are open. Don't miss

the Yaletown Brewing Company for a pint. Yaletown is one of the Aquabus stops - a fleet of small

electric ferries that transport people across False Creek and a great way to see and get around Vancouver.

Beaches Vancouver has plenty of access to waterfront with 18 km or 11 mi of beach that will appeal to a range of

visitors. Many of the beaches have boardwalks for cycling or blading, playgrounds, pools, kayak and

windsurf rentals, volleyball courts, bbq ‘s and all of the beaches have lifeguards on duty from late May to

Labour Day. Three beaches are designated "quiet" and amplified music is prohibited

Historic Gastown Gastown is one of Vancouver's oldest districts and boasts many beautiful

refurbished buildings, cobblestone lanes and the world's first steam-powered

clock. People who enjoy slightly more eclectic shopping will enjoy the

designers' shops, artists' studios, galleries plus restaurants and bars. Visitors

should be aware that Gastown borders a part of town that is known for the

presence of drug users and everything that goes along with that. Best to have

a good map and not meander without keeping your bearings.

Whistler Located in the spectacular Coast Mountains of British Columbia, and just

two hours north of Vancouver, Whistler is Canada’s premier, year-round

destination. Consistently ranked the number one mountain resort in North

America, Whistler features two majestic mountains, epic skiing and

snowboarding conditions, four championship golf courses, more than 200

shops, 90 restaurants and bars, accommodations galore, hiking trails, spas

and arguably the best mountain bike park in the world. In short, Whistler

has everything you will ever need to have the time of your life - and so much more.

Vancouver Island and Gulf Islands Vancouver Island and the nearby Gulf Islands is one of the premier travel

destinations in the World. Vancouver Island has a population of over

750,000 and stretches southeast to northwest along the western coast of

British Columbia. The rugged west coast is cut deeply by fjords lined

between high mountains with many communities located along the shores of

protected bays. The eastern plain is rich with timber, farmlands, fishing

streams, villages, and modern cities. Vancouver Island accommodations, BC Outdoor Adventure and

indoor activities are available to suit families, honeymooners, day trippers, couples, singles, boaters, or

seniors looking for winter long stays in our mild climate.

Victoria

Victoria is the Capital City of British Columbia and has a well-earned reputation for its myriad of

beautiful flower gardens, lush green shrubbery and wide variety of fantastic trees of every kind, size and

shape. Canada’s ‘Garden City’ is surrounded by sparkling ocean and

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splendid mountain views and from May to September the downtown streets are brightened by the over-

flowing baskets of flowers hanging from classic antique lampposts. With its distinctive architecture and

natural beauty Victoria is a favourite destination for tourists arriving by ferry from Port Angeles, Seattle

and Bellingham and is a popular stopping point for Alaska-bound cruise ships. The City offers an

abundance of historical and tourist attractions and a full spectrum of entertainment, cinemas, theatres,

pubs, clubs and international and seafood restaurants.

Vancouver Trolley Hop-On-Hop- Off Tour Trolleys that stop at 24 different locations in Vancouver. You can hop on and hop

off at any of these stops, which allows you to go shopping, sample the restaurants

and sight-see Vancouver’s major attractions. Book for two days in advance and

inquire about combo deals being offered.

Bloedel Conservatory Found in Queen Elizabeth Park (Cambie Street and 33rd Avenue). Open seven

days, a 10am to 5pm. This conservatory is home to over 100 species of birds and

is filled with exotic plants as well as those native to Canada.

Museum of Anthropology Located on the University of British Columbia campus (6393 North West Marine

Drive). This museum provides information about and access to cultural objects

from around the world with emphasis on the achievements and concerns of the

First Peoples and British Columbia’s cultural communities.

Science World The big silver ball building east of Downtown (1455 Quebec Street). Open

Monday to Friday from 10am to 5pm and Saturdays, Sundays and holidays from

10am to 6pm. Features a variety of galleries and exhibitions related to science, as

well as a variety of things to make, do and play.

Movie Theatres There are many cinemas in Vancouver, some of which are listed below:

Scotiabank Theatre, 900 Burrard Street, Tel: (604) 630-1407,

http://www.cineplex.com/Theatres/TheatreDetails/Scotiabank-Theatre-

Vancouver.aspx This is the newest theatre located in downtown Vancouver

Pacific Cinematheque, 1131 Howe St, Tel: (604) 688-3456,

http://www.cinematheque.bc.ca The main venue for rep, independent, art-

house, foreign or just plain off-the-wall films. Shows change nightly. Also

has a first-class film-reference library.

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Tinseltown, 88 West Pender, Tel: (604) 806-0799. One of the best and most reasonably priced of

the first-run cinemas.

Festival Cinemas (various locations) – www.festivalcinemas.ca –tickets range from $8.50-$12.

Craigslist

Craigslist is a great resource for finding accommodation, buying or selling items, finding out what events

are coming up, finding services, placing personal adverts, joining communities and participating in

discussion forums. http://vancouver.en.craigslist.ca/

Some things to keep in mind when using Craigslist:

Deal locally with people you can actually meet with – this will help you avoid most of the scams.

NEVER wire funds via Western Union, Money Gram or any other wire service – anyone who

asks you to do so is a scammer and you will probably never see your money again.

Fake cashier cheques and money orders are common and banks will cash them and THEN HOLD

YOU RESPONSIBLE when the fake is discovered.

Craigslist is not involved in any transaction and does not handle payments, guarantee transactions

or offer buyer protection or seller certification.

NEVER GIVE OUT FINANCIAL INFORMATION!!! (Bank account number, SIN number etc).

Avoid deals involving shipping or ‘escrow’ services. ONLY A SCAMMER WILL

GUARANTEE YOUR TRANSACTION.

How to recognize a scam:

Most scams involve one or more of the following:

Inquiry from someone far away, often in another country

Western Union, cashier’s cheque, money order, shipping, escrow service or a guarantee.

Inability or refusal to meet face to face before completing a transaction.

Identity theft is a huge worldwide problem, so NEVER give out your personal details (especially

passport numbers, SIN numbers etc.)

Don’t let these warnings put you off Craigslist entirely. It is a very useful resource to have, but

JUST BE CAREFUL!!

Local Hostels

There are many hostels in Downtown Vancouver that are affordable and close to English Bay College.

Please keep the following advice in mind when you are looking for a hostel to stay at:

Some of the better hostels that can be found in Vancouver City Centre:

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Hostelling International Vancouver Central – 1025 Granville Street. Offers a variety of special

deals. From $26 CAD per night

Hostelling International Vancouver Downtown – 1114 Burnaby Street. Offers a variety of

special deals. From $26 CAD per night.

The Cambie International Hostel – 515 Seymour Street. From $24 CAD. If you purchase a

Cambie card, you’ll get discounted rates.

Go to www.hostelbookers.com for more hostel options.

YWCA – Student Residence – 733 Beatty Street- 604-895-5830

Lord Stanley Suites On the Park (hotel/apartments) – 1889 Alberni Street – 604-688-9299

Local Places of Worship

The city caters to various religious groups and it may be a good place for you to meet new friends in these

places of worship. Some are:

Coastal Church - 1160 Georgia St W, Vancouver, BC V6E 3H7 (Tel: 604-684 8475)

Catholic Ukrainian Church - 550 W 14th Ave, Vancouver, BC (Tel: 604-879 5830)

Ukrainian Orthodox Holy Trinity Cathedral - 154 E 10th Ave, Vancouver, BC (Tel: 604-876

4747)

Vancouver Buddhist Temple – 220 Jackson Avenue, Vancouver (Tel: 604-253 7033)

More places of worship can be retrieved from Yellow Pages online directory: http://www.yellowpages.ca/

North American Practices

Personal hygiene involves those practices performed by an

individual to care for one's bodily health and well-being, through

cleanliness. Motivations for personal hygiene practice include

reduction of personal illness, healing from personal illness, optimal

health and sense of well-being, social acceptance and prevention of

spread of illness to others. Other practices which are generally

considered proper hygiene include bathing regularly, washing

hands regularly and especially before handling food, wearing clean

clothing, brushing one's teeth, besides other practices.

Personal grooming is a form of personal hygiene. Personal

grooming is very important for a positive self-image. The very first

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look of an individual gives an idea how well maintained and well-dignified that person is and what kind

of personality he possess.

If we are well groomed, we look good. If we look good, we feel good. If we feel good, we feel

confident. If we feel confident, it shows, and we get on better in both our professional and social

lives.

HELPFUL HINTS

Canadian People

Canadians are generally very polite, so always try to say please and thank you. Don’t be afraid to say

hello to a stranger and if a stranger says hello to you, don’t be surprised, it’s normal. Try to be positive

when speaking… say hello back…and how are you? You can basically speak to everyone… It’s the way

of life, relaxed, easy going and friendly.

Tipping and Taxes

All prices are exclusive of the Goods and Services Tax (GST) and Provincial Sales Tax (PST) so

if you see a price you will have to add either 7% or 14%. (depending on the province and the

item)

When you eat at a restaurant it is customary to tip 10 - 20% of the bill unless the service is really

bad. When you get the bill you can either write the tip on the credit card stub or if you are paying

cash you leave the tip on the bill tray on the table. You don’t say “add it to the bill” as you do

(e.g. in Germany.)

At a bar it is customary to tip around 15% of the drink order. Either put some money in the tip jar

or say what the tip is.

Laws and Regulations

The drinking and smoking age is 19 years in British Columbia and is strictly enforced. 2 pieces of

ID are required to buy alcohol in most establishments.

There is no smoking in any public places including bars, clubs and restaurants and it is strictly

enforced.

There is no drinking alcohol in non-specified public places and it is enforced.

Alcohol and cigarettes can only be sold at specific liquor stores or kiosks.

All bars and clubs close at 3am or earlier.

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Tax Refund for Visitors

As a non-resident visitor to Canada you can claim a refund for goods and services tax/harmonized sales

tax (GST) you paid on eligible goods and short-term accommodation while visiting Canada. You must

have your receipts stamped by Canada Customs before you check in your luggage at the airport.

To qualify for a tax refund, you have to meet the following conditions:

you are not a resident of Canada at the time you apply for a refund;

you purchased eligible goods for personal use, eligible short term accommodation or both;

you paid GST/PST on these purchases;

you have original receipts (they do not accept photocopies, debit or credit card slips);

you have Proof of Export for the eligible goods you purchased in Canada;

the total of your purchase amounts (before taxes) must be at least CAN$200; each receipt for

eligible goods shows a minimum total purchase amount (before taxes) of CAN$50; and the goods

are removed from Canada within 60 days of the date you bought them.

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Canadian Facts

Full country name: Canada

Area: 9.97 million sq. km

Population: 36.3 million

Capital City: Ottawa

People: British, French, Italian, First Nations, plus significant minorities of Irish, German,

Ukrainian, Dutch, Greek, Polish and Chinese descent

Languages: English, French

Religion: Catholic (45%), Protestant (36%) and minorities from most of the world's major

religions

Government: Constitutional Monarchy

Head of State: Governor General David Johnston (representing Queen Elizabeth II)

Head of Government: Prime Minister Justin Trudeau (Liberal Party)

Major Trading Partners: USA, Japan, EU, China and South Korea