Safety Chapter 14 Mosby items and derived items © 2011, 2006, 2003, 1999, 1995, 1991 by Mosby, Inc., an affiliate of Elsevier Inc

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Text of Safety Chapter 14 Mosby items and derived items © 2011, 2006, 2003, 1999, 1995, 1991 by Mosby,...

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  • Safety Chapter 14 Mosby items and derived items 2011, 2006, 2003, 1999, 1995, 1991 by Mosby, Inc., an affiliate of Elsevier Inc.
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  • Slide 2Mosby items and derived items 2011, 2006, 2003, 1999, 1995, 1991 by Mosby, Inc., an affiliate of Elsevier Inc. Safe Environment This implies freedom from injury with a focus on preventing falls, electrical injuries, fires, burns, and poisoning. The nurse must be aware of potential safety problems and must know how to report and respond when safety is threatened. The responsibility for providing and maintaining a safe environment involves the patient, visitors, and members of the health care team. Both protection and education are primary nursing responsibilities.
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  • Slide 3Mosby items and derived items 2011, 2006, 2003, 1999, 1995, 1991 by Mosby, Inc., an affiliate of Elsevier Inc. Safe Environment Falls The majority of patient falls occur during transfer either to a bedside commode or to a wheelchair. High risk The very young Older adults Individuals who become ill or who are injured Unfamiliar environment and various symptoms and signs associated with the patients diagnosis may also place the individual at risk.
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  • Slide 4Mosby items and derived items 2011, 2006, 2003, 1999, 1995, 1991 by Mosby, Inc., an affiliate of Elsevier Inc. Safe Environment Falls (continued) Gait belts This is an added safety feature in ambulating patients. Apply gait belt securely around patients waist. Walk to the side of the patient, one arm around waist and hand on the belt. Walk on the weaker side. Patient can support him- or herself by leaning or holding onto nurses arm. Nurse should walk with his or her closest leg just behind the patients knee. Walk with knees and hips flexed.
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  • Slide 5Mosby items and derived items 2011, 2006, 2003, 1999, 1995, 1991 by Mosby, Inc., an affiliate of Elsevier Inc. Safe Environment Infants and Children Ensuring the safety of the environment of infants and children requires protection of the child and education of the parents. Accidents involving children are largely preventable, but parents and caregivers need to be aware of specific dangers at each stage of growth and development.
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  • Slide 6Mosby items and derived items 2011, 2006, 2003, 1999, 1995, 1991 by Mosby, Inc., an affiliate of Elsevier Inc. Safe Environment Older Adults Changes associated with aging significantly affect the ability of older adults to protect themselves from injury. Unsteadiness in gait causes falls. Vision changes may affect the ability to see the height of stairs. Vertigo may occur due to disease and/or medications.
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  • Slide 7Mosby items and derived items 2011, 2006, 2003, 1999, 1995, 1991 by Mosby, Inc., an affiliate of Elsevier Inc. Accidental Poisoning Childhood poisoning is one of the major causes of death in children under 5 years of age. The older adult is also at risk. Changes associated with aging interfere with the individuals ability to absorb or excrete drugs. The older adult may share drugs with friends. Changes in eyesight may lead to an accidental ingestion.
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  • Slide 8Mosby items and derived items 2011, 2006, 2003, 1999, 1995, 1991 by Mosby, Inc., an affiliate of Elsevier Inc. Accidental Poisoning Hospitalized patients and those in other types of health care facilities can be at risk for accidental poisoning because there are many poisonous substances in the environment. Cleaning solutions Disinfectants Drugs
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  • Slide 9Mosby items and derived items 2011, 2006, 2003, 1999, 1995, 1991 by Mosby, Inc., an affiliate of Elsevier Inc. Accidental Poisoning Preventing Poisoning Remove toxic agents from areas where poisoning could occur. Toxic or poisonous substances should not be removed from their original containers. Poisonous substances should be labeled conspicuously and stored appropriately. Poison control centers are valuable sources of information when poisoning is suspected or does occur.
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  • Slide 10Mosby items and derived items 2011, 2006, 2003, 1999, 1995, 1991 by Mosby, Inc., an affiliate of Elsevier Inc. Applying Safety Reminder Devices Safety reminder device (SRD) Any one of numerous devices used to immobilize a patient or part of the patients body, such as arms or hands Used for various reasons Patient safety Maintain treatment Prevent wandering Prevent or reduce the risk of falls Restrict movement of an aggressive patient to protect other patients and staff
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  • Slide 11Mosby items and derived items 2011, 2006, 2003, 1999, 1995, 1991 by Mosby, Inc., an affiliate of Elsevier Inc. Applying Safety Reminder Devices Ethical and legal issues surround their use. The focus is on using alternative strategies before SRDs are applied. Patient safety or the safety of others must be the priority reason why an SRD is applied. The use of SRDs can also result in increased restlessness, disorientation, agitation, anxiety, and a feeling of powerlessness. Documentation about the need for the SRDs, the type of device used, and the patient response is crucial.
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  • Slide 12Mosby items and derived items 2011, 2006, 2003, 1999, 1995, 1991 by Mosby, Inc., an affiliate of Elsevier Inc. Skill 14-1: Step 6a(3) Applying safety reminder devices. (From Potter, P.A., Perry, A.G. [2005]. Fundamentals of nursing. [6 th ed.]. St. Louis: Mosby.)
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  • Slide 13Mosby items and derived items 2011, 2006, 2003, 1999, 1995, 1991 by Mosby, Inc., an affiliate of Elsevier Inc. Skill 14-1: Step 6a(4) Applying safety reminder devices. (From Potter, P.A., Perry, A.G. [2005]. Fundamentals of nursing. [6 th ed.]. St. Louis: Mosby.)
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  • Slide 14Mosby items and derived items 2011, 2006, 2003, 1999, 1995, 1991 by Mosby, Inc., an affiliate of Elsevier Inc. Skill 14-1: Step 6b(1) Applying safety reminder devices. (From Potter, P.A., Perry, A.G. [2005]. Fundamentals of nursing. [6 th ed.]. St. Louis: Mosby.)
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  • Slide 15Mosby items and derived items 2011, 2006, 2003, 1999, 1995, 1991 by Mosby, Inc., an affiliate of Elsevier Inc. Skill 14-1: Step 6c(2) Applying safety reminder devices.
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  • Slide 16Mosby items and derived items 2011, 2006, 2003, 1999, 1995, 1991 by Mosby, Inc., an affiliate of Elsevier Inc. Skill 14-1: Step 6c(4) Applying safety reminder devices. (From Potter, P.A., Perry, A.G. [2005]. Fundamentals of nursing. [6 th ed.]. St. Louis: Mosby.)
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  • Slide 17Mosby items and derived items 2011, 2006, 2003, 1999, 1995, 1991 by Mosby, Inc., an affiliate of Elsevier Inc. Skill 14-1: Step 6d(1) Applying safety reminder devices. (From Potter, P.A., Perry, A.G. [2005]. Fundamentals of nursing. [6 th ed.]. St. Louis: Mosby.)
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  • Slide 18Mosby items and derived items 2011, 2006, 2003, 1999, 1995, 1991 by Mosby, Inc., an affiliate of Elsevier Inc. Skill 14-1: Step 7 Applying safety reminder devices.
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  • Slide 19Mosby items and derived items 2011, 2006, 2003, 1999, 1995, 1991 by Mosby, Inc., an affiliate of Elsevier Inc. Skill 14-1: Step 15a Applying safety reminder devices. (From Elkin, M.K., Perry, A.G., Potter, P.A. [2004]. Nursing interventions and clinical skills. [3 rd ed.]. St. Louis: Mosby.)
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  • Slide 20Mosby items and derived items 2011, 2006, 2003, 1999, 1995, 1991 by Mosby, Inc., an affiliate of Elsevier Inc. Skill 14-1: Step 15b Applying safety reminder devices. (From Elkin, M.K., Perry, A.G., Potter, P.A. [2004]. Nursing interventions and clinical skills. [3 rd ed.]. St. Louis: Mosby.)
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  • Slide 21Mosby items and derived items 2011, 2006, 2003, 1999, 1995, 1991 by Mosby, Inc., an affiliate of Elsevier Inc. Skill 14-1: Step 15c Applying safety reminder devices. (From Elkin, M.K., Perry, A.G., Potter, P.A. [2004]. Nursing interventions and clinical skills. [3 rd ed.]. St. Louis: Mosby.)
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  • Slide 22Mosby items and derived items 2011, 2006, 2003, 1999, 1995, 1991 by Mosby, Inc., an affiliate of Elsevier Inc. Skill 14-1: Step 15d Applying safety reminder devices. (From Elkin, M.K., Perry, A.G., Potter, P.A. [2004]. Nursing interventions and clinical skills. [3 rd ed.]. St. Louis: Mosby.)
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  • Slide 23Mosby items and derived items 2011, 2006, 2003, 1999, 1995, 1991 by Mosby, Inc., an affiliate of Elsevier Inc. Hospital/Health Care Environment The hospital environment is a source of potential safety hazards for health care workers. Biologic, chemical, and physical hazards Lasers Blood and body fluids Contaminated needles Radiation Vaccine-preventable diseases
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  • Slide 24Mosby items and derived items 2011, 2006, 2003, 1999, 1995, 1991 by Mosby, Inc., an affiliate of Elsevier Inc. Safe Environment Left-Handed Patient The typical hospital room environment is set up to accommodate the right-handed patient. Left-handed patients may struggle and strain to cope by contorting the body, which creates a risk for injury situation. The discerning nurse will document in the patients record the fact that the patient is left-handed.
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  • Slide 25Mosby items and derived items 2011, 2006, 2003, 1999, 1995, 1991 by Mosby, Inc., an affiliate of Elsevier Inc. Safe Environment Safety Features for the