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REVIEW GAMES Story Sort Vocabulary Words: Arcade Games Study Stack Spelling City: Vocabulary Spelling City: Spelling W ords

REVIEW GAMES Story Sort Vocabulary Words: Arcade Games Arcade Games Study Stack Study Stack Spelling City: Vocabulary Spelling City: Vocabulary

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SPELLING WORDS

SHORT VOWELS

damage gentle injury palace cottage honesty mustard legend clumsy message modify ruffle glimpse

strict dungeon fender fantastic dignity property cannon reconcile hippopotamus lozenge insulation glamorous

VOCABULARY WORDS

apparently fixtures flimsy incident subscribe survive

Vocabulary Words

NEIGHBORHOOD

STEPS

CONCEPT VOCABULARY

(To add information to the graphic organizer, click on end show, type in your new information, and save your changes.)

VOCABULARY WORDS

VOCABULARY WORDSUNIT 1 WEEK 2 – TEST FRIDAY, 8/29

apparently – seemingly; evidently fixtures – things put in place to stay

(like sink and faucet) flimsy – easily torn or broken; not

strongly made; thin incident – something that happens; event subscribe – to give your consent or

approval; support survive – to continue to exist; endure

MORE WORDS TO KNOWUNIT 1 WEEK 2

artist – a person who produces paintings and drawings

precede – go before discourage – prevent by expressing an

unfavorable opinion excitement – a feeling of great enthusiasm unrest – a state of dissatisfaction awkwardly – in a manner that is not graceful

FIXTURES

PATROLMAN

TOUSLED

SUBJECTS AND PREDICATES

Two slim attendants carried the old woman out.

The complete subject of this sentence is Two slim attendants, and the complete predicate is carried the old woman out.

SUBJECTS AND PREDICATES

A sentence must have both a subject and a predicate.

The subject is the part of the sentence that tells whom or what the sentence is about.

SUBJECTS AND PREDICATES

All the words in the subject are the complete subject. The most important word in the complete subject is the simple subject. It may be more than one word, such as Mrs. Williams.

My favorite neighbor lives in a big yellow house. (The simple subject is neighbor.)

SUBJECTS AND PREDICATES

The predicate is the part of a sentence that tells what the subject is or does. All the words in the predicate are the complete predicate.

SUBJECTS AND PREDICATES

The most important word in the predicate is the simple predicate, or verb.

A simple predicate can be more than one word, such as has lived.

My favorite neighbor lives in a big yellow house. (The simple predicate is lives.)

SUBJECTS AND PREDICATES

A fragment is a group of words that lacks a subject or a predicate.

Lived in her house for 60 years. (This fragment lacks a subject.)

SUBJECTS AND PREDICATES

A run-on is two or more complete sentences run together.

Mrs. Williams has a flower garden her roses are beautiful.

She tends her garden in the evening, she sometimes gives me a rose.

SUBJECTS AND PREDICATESDRAW A LINE BETWEEN THE COMPLETE SUBJECT AND THE COMPLETE PREDICATE IN EACH

SENTENCE.

Her house is surrounded by a white picket fence.

Her house / is surrounded by a white picket fence.

Many beautiful flowers grow in the front yard.

Many beautiful flowers / grow in the front yard.

SUBJECTS AND PREDICATESDRAW A LINE BETWEEN THE COMPLETE SUBJECT AND THE COMPLETE PREDICATE IN EACH

SENTENCE.

Mrs. Williams works in her gardens every day during the good weather.

Mrs. Williams / works in her gardens every day during the good weather.

Two huge oak trees tower over her house.

Two huge oak trees / tower over her house.

SUBJECTS AND PREDICATESDRAW ONE LINE UNDER THE SIMPLE SUBJECT AND TWO LINES UNDER THE SIMPLE

PREDICATE.

The neighborhood children paint the white picket fence every year.

The neighborhood children paint the white picket fence every year.

Mrs. Williams rewards us with delicious homemade cookies and pies.

Mrs. Williams rewards us with delicious homemade cookies and pies.

SUBJECTS AND PREDICATESDRAW ONE LINE UNDER THE SIMPLE SUBJECT AND TWO LINES UNDER THE SIMPLE

PREDICATE.

A gigantic tree in her backyard provides the fruit.

A gigantic tree in her backyard provides the fruit.

The extra apples are given to all the people in the neighborhood.

The extra apples are given to all the people in the neighborhood.

SUBJECTS AND PREDICATESIS EACH GROUP OF WORDS A FRAGMENT OR A RUN-ON?

Tells wonderful stories about her childhood.

fragment She grew up in Tennessee she lived

on a small farm. run-on

SUBJECTS AND PREDICATESIS EACH GROUP OF WORDS A SENTENCE, A FRAGMENT, OR A RUN-ON?

Her father taught her everything about farming.

sentence Mrs. Williams has been growing

things ever since. sentence

CHARACTER Characters are the people or

animals who take part in the events of a story.

You can understand the characters by examining their words and actions.

You can also understand characters by the way other people speak about them and act toward them.

CHARACTER

Statements and actions of character

Statements and actions

of other characters

Description of

character

SYMBOL

A symbol is a character, object, or idea that not only has meaning in itself, but also suggests or stands for other meanings. For example, the American flag is a symbol of the country of America. It can also symbolize patriotism.

SYMBOL

Symbols are used when an author wants to convey more than one meaning.

Some symbols are universal (for example, a heart symbolizes love) while others are particular to a specific story.

GREEK AND LATIN ROOTS You can use your knowledge of

Greek and Latin roots to help you determine the meanings of unfamiliar words.

List any unknown words you encounter as you read “Mother Fletcher’s Gift.”

Create a chart showing the unknown word, the root you recognized and its definition, and what you believe is the definition of the unknown word.

Use a dictionary to check your work.