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Project Implementation Report:

Oddar Meanchey Community Forestry REDD+ Project

Climate, Community & Biodiversity Standard

Prepared by:

and

for

The Forestry Administration of the Royal Government of Cambodia

VERIFICATION PERIOD: February 28, 2008 February 28, 2012

Version 5-0 August 26, 2013

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Table of Contents

1 INTRODUCTION & ORIGINAL CONDITIONS IN THE PROJECT AREA 3

2 OVERVIEW OF MONITORING PLAN 5

2.1 ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES OF PROJECT PARTNERS 5

3 MONITORING DATA COLLECTION, STORAGE AND REPORTING 6

4 DRIVERS OF DEFORESTATION IDENTIFIED DURING MONITORING PERIOD 8

5 IMPLEMENTATION STATUS OF PROJECT ACTIVITIES 13

5.1 REINFORCING LAND TENURE 13

5.2 LAND-USE PLANS 16

5.3 FOREST PROTECTION 21

5.4 FUEL EFFICIENT STOVES 26

5.5 LIVESTOCK PROTECTION 26

5.6 AGRICULTURAL INTENSIFICATION 27

5.7 NATURAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT PROJECTS 28

5.8 NTFP DEVELOPMENT 28

5.9 FIRE PREVENTION 29

6 CLIMATE IMPACT MONITORING 30

6.1 NET POSITIVE CLIMATE IMPACTS AND OFFSITE CLIMATE IMPACTS 30

6.2 CLIMATE CHANGE ADAPTATION BENEFITS 35

7 COMMUNITY IMPACT MONITORING 37

7.1 NET POSITIVE COMMUNITY IMPACTS 43

7.2 ASSESSMENT OF NEGATIVE OFFSITE STAKEHOLDER IMPACTS 44

7.3 EXCEPTIONAL COMMUNITY BENEFITS 45

8 BIODIVERSITY IMPACT MONITORING 50

8.1 NET POSITIVE BIODIVERSITY IMPACTS 50

8.2 OFFSITE BIODIVERSITY IMPACTS 53

8.3 EXCEPTIONAL BIODIVERSITY IMPACTS 54

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1 Introduction & Original Conditions in the Project Area

This Project Implementation Report (PIR) has been prepared by Terra Global Capital and Pact

with support from the Forestry Administration of the Royal Government of Cambodia for the

first monitoring period (February 28, 2008- February 28, 2012) of the Oddar Meanchey REDD

Project. This PIR summarizes the monitoring information related to implementation of project

activities and associated climate, community and biodiversity collected during the first

monitoring period. A monitoring plan has been prepared according to the requirements of the

CCB standards, and has been used as the basis for collection of information for this PIR. The CCB

PDD contains all information related to the overall climate, community and biodiversity

objectives of the project and should be referred to as the primary resource for such

information, much of which has not been replicated in this document.

The project is being implemented by the Forestry Administration of the Royal Government of

Cambodia, along with Pact, Terra Global Capital, Childrens Development Association, and

Monks Community Forestry Association, with funding support provided by The John D. and

Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, Danida/DfID/NZAID, US State Department, the Clinton

Climate Initiative, Pact, Terra Global Capital, JICA, and the United Nations Development

Program (UNDP).

This project supports sustainable forest management and livelihood development in Oddar

Meanchey Province by implementing project activities financed through the sale of carbon

credits generated from forest protection and regeneration. The project has secured legal land

tenure for each of the 13 Community Forest groups involved in the project, and is

implementing activities that will create a 30-year income stream to directly enhance household

livelihoods and natural resource management capacity. The project has implemented activities

that seek to maintain and increase carbon stocks in these areas and conserve biodiversity.

The original conditions of the project area are described in detail in Section G1 of the CCB PDD

for the project, available publically on the CCB website. A brief summary of the original

conditions in the project area follows.

The Royal Government of Cambodia and the Forestry Administration, along with Terra Global

Capital, Pact Cambodia and Community Forestry International have developed the first

Cambodian Reduced Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation (REDD) project. The

project involves 13 Community Forestry Groups, comprised of 58 villages, which protect a

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56,050 hectare project area within a total of 63,831 hectares of Community Forests in the

Northwestern province of Oddar Meanchey.

The Oddar Meanchey Province provides an ideal site for the development of a REDD project.

The provinces forests have been under intense pressure from commercial and illegal logging,

forest fire, economic land concessions and encroachment. Oddar Meanchey has lost 2% of its

forests each year from 2002 - 2006, driven by illegal logging, fire, (ex-)soldiers and migrant

settlers moving into the region and clearing forests for agriculture.

The project site is covered by lowland evergreen, semi-evergreen, and dry deciduous forests.

Semi-evergreen forests contain varying percentages of evergreen and deciduous trees, with the

percentage of evergreen trees varying from 30% to 70%. Semi-evergreen forests appear

evergreen throughout the year, despite a frequently high proportion of deciduous trees.

Deciduous forests are comprised of mixed deciduous forests and dry Dipterocarpaceae forests,

both of which drop most of their leaves during the dry season. The majority of forests in the

plains of the Northern provinces are dry-land ecosystems.

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2 Overview of Monitoring Plan

2.1 Roles and Responsibilities of Project Partners

General organizational structure and responsibilities for monitoring of the project are outlined

here. A detailed overview of these responsibilities is included in the CCB PIR.

Pact. Pact is responsible for managing, outsourcing and collecting the results of (1) biomass

inventory measurements, (2) social assessments, (3) recording action activity implementation,

and (4) any other data required to be monitored under this methodology. Pact executed first-

pass quality assurance and quality control (QA/QC) checks on all of the monitoring data

collected. Pact maintains records of all field inventory and social appraisal data sheets and all

other evidence demonstrating the correct execution of project implementation.

Forestry Administration. During these first five years of the project, the FA has been providing

assistance in the annual field inventory measurements, social assessments, and in the review of

the monitoring reports. The FA will be trained to become the responsible party for all

monitoring requirements five years after validation of the project.

Terra Global Capital. Terra Global Capital is responsible for verifying that the required elements

are monitored, overseeing or executing all modeling and calculations, and performing second-

pass QA/QC checks. In addition, Terra Global Capital is responsible for developing the

monitoring reports for the project.

Childrens Development Organization. Childrens Development Organization has assisted in field

inventories, social appraisals and recording project activities.

Community Forestry Federation, Monks Community Forests and the CFMCs. The communities

involved in the REDD project have been collaborating through social appraisals, reporting

natural disasters and challenges related to forest protection to the implementing organization.

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3 Monitoring Data Collection, Storage and Reporting

The project will draw upon multiple data sources and methods for monitoring, reporting and

verification including a household survey, participatory rural appraisals (PRA), biodiversity

assessment, biomass inventory, remote sensing, desktop review and project documentation.

Table 1. Monitoring Data Sources and Methods

Category Method/Data

Source Frequency Reporting Responsibility

Social Assessment

Participatory

Rural Appraisal

(PRA) Every 2 years VCS /

CCB CDA, TGC, Pact

Household

Survey (HHS)

Biomass

inventory

Sample plot field

survey [See SOP] VCS Pact, TGC

Land use land

class (LULC)

change

Remote sensing Every 2 years VCS TGC

Biodiversity

assessment

Field

observation Ongoing CCB CFMCs, Consultant

Project

documentation

Activity

reporting Ongoing

VCS /

CCB

CFMCs, CDA, Pact,

TGC

Periodic social

assessment

Ongoing or

as needed

Potential

Independent Party,

Consultant

Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) developed by TGC and Pact will be used to collect all

data required for VCS. There are three levels of data collection tools including:

Standard operating procedures (SOP)

Protocols

Data collection forms

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The purpose of SOPs and Protocols is to provide a standardized and consistent basis for data

collection, management and reporting. SOPs and protocols are therefore an important aspect

of quality control and assurance.

Mobile handsets have been used as data collection tools to increase efficiency and reduce

transaction costs in data collection, storage and processing, while increasing data quality

assurance and control measures. Though only some data is collected in mobile handsets now,

routine activity data (i.e. patrols) collected will be stored at three sites; the field CFMC level on

hand sets), aggregated at the provincial level in a server administrated by CDA and linked to

another local server administrated by Pact, and a centralized server (administered by TGC)

which hold all VCS data.

The data quality has been maximized and ensured during all aspects of the monitoring process

through quality assurance and quality control (QA/QC) procedures. In monitoring field

inventory data and data analysis, all individuals and institutions involved in evaluating the

quality of analytical data have followed the rigorous QA/QC procedures developed for this

project. These QA/QC procedures included specific criteria to evaluate the quality of analytical

data that has been gathered. The QA/QC procedures have been an absolutely essential part of

monitoring.

Responsibilities and frequencies for monitoring reporting are summarized in Table 2.

Table 2. Monitoring Reporting Responsibilities and Timeline

Report Responsibility Reporting to Timeframe

Verification Report Pact Cambodia / TGC VCS Verifier Every 2 years

Activity Report Pact Cambodia FA Quarterly / Annually

Activity Report CDA / CFN / Monks

CFA

Local Authorities As required

Activity Report CFMC CDA & CFN As required

Biodiversity Report Biodiversity consultant Pact Cambodia & FA Annually after 1st

verification

Evaluation Report Independent evaluator Pact Cambodia & FA Every 3 years

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4 Drivers of Deforestation Identified During Monitoring Period

Each of the baseline drivers of deforestation expected to take place in the project area over the

course of the crediting period have been identified and described in detail the CCB PDD. These

baseline drivers of deforestation were identified during the project design phase in

collaboration with the local communities through the Participatory Rural Appraisals (PRAs).

Additional PRAs were carried out during this monitoring period (between June 7th and July 15th,

2012) in each of the 13 CFs to determine the extent to which the drivers identified in the PDD

were observed within the project area within this monitoring period. Continual monitoring on

drivers and agents of deforestation is important as new drivers and agents may become evident

in the project area. It is necessary to continually monitor the drivers and agents in order to

better address the true causes of deforestation in the area.

Table 3. Summary of PRAs implemented during this monitoring period

Men Women

Andong Bor 19 June 2012 08:40:00 Kantuy Choun Khiev Samnang 12 3

Chhouk Meas 7 June 2012 08:30:00 Chhouk Meas Yeang Donal 8 6

Dung Beng 21 June 2012 08:40:00 Yeay Tep Khiev Samnang 6 4

Ou Yeay Kaov 26 June 2012 08:30:00 Opork Net Channa 6 4

Phaav 10 July 2012 08:40:00 Thnal Keng Net Channa 6 6

Prey Srorng 4 July 2012 08:20:00 Ou Koki Kandal Neab Keng 9 8

Prey Srors 15 July 2012 08:30:00 Chheu Slap Vinh San 10 7

Ratanak Ruka 5 June 2012 08:30:00 Ou Kansaeng Net Channa 9 4

Rolus Thom 12 June 2012 09:00:00 Kdol Khiev Samnang 10 2

Romdoul Veasna 26 June 2012 08:30:00 Sambour Meas Khiev Samnang 4 11

Samaky 28 June 2012 08:30:00 Thmey Khiev Samnang 7 7

Sangkrous Preychheu 12 July 2012 08:00:00 Rum Chek Net Channa 7 3

Sorng Rokavorn 28 June 2012 08:40:00 Thmey Neab Keng 4 4

# of Participants

PRA CF Date of PRA Start Time Facilitator NameVillage

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Figure 1. Community Members in Andong Bor CF rank drivers of deforestation by distributing

a set quantity of beans

Community members in each CF were asked to rank each driver of deforestation according to

their perceived importance (i.e. the most deforestation caused). A ranking system was

employed using beans, wherein the participants in each PRA were issued 100 beans and asked

to allocate an appropriate number of beans to each driver of deforestation according to their

relative importance. As an example, Table 4 shows the outcome of this ranking exercise for the

CF Ratanak Ruka.

Table 4. Outcome of PRA Driver of Deforestation Ranking Exercise from Ratanak Ruka CF

Driver # of Beans

ELC 22

Illegal Logging 19

Conversion to Settlement 18

Charcoal Production 17

Forest Fire 13

Land clearing for agriculture 11

TOTAL 100

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The aggregated outcome of this exercise, i.e. the relative importance of each driver of

deforestation across all 13 CFs is shown in Figure 2. Drivers consisting of less than 1% of total

have been excluded from this chart.

Figure 2. Relative Importance of Drivers of Deforestation Occurring within the Project Zone

During this Monitoring Period

Similarly, the agents of deforestation responsible for these drivers of deforestation were

identified and ranked by the communities. The outcome of this ranking is shown in Figure 3.

ELC

Land clearing for agriculture

Illegal logging

Forest fire

Land clearing for sale

Charcoal production

Land clearing for military camp

Hunting

Natural disaster Migration

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Figure 3. Relative Importance of Agents of Deforestation Operating Within the Project Zone

During this Monitoring Period

Each of the drivers of deforestation identified in Figure 2 were anticipated in the PDD, with the

exception of Land Clearing for Military Camps. The prevalence of this driver has been driven by

the recent military border conflicts between Cambodia and Thailand, which h...

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