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  • 1. BUSINESS PROCESS ANALYSISMethodology for Information SystemRequirements Definition and Logical Design Utilizing Communicable DiseaseInvestigation & ReportingBusiness Process Analysis Examples Presented by:Pete Kitch KIPHS, Inc.

2. PRESENTATION OUTLINE

  • Introduction to Business Processes
  • Elements of Business Process Analysis
  • Functional AnalysisApproach
  • Context Diagramming
  • Task flow Diagramming
  • Information System Support

3. FRAMEWORK FOR MONTANA PHDS ASSESSMENT PROJECT State Stakeholders Presentation October 13, 2006 Presented by:Pete Kitch KIPHS, Inc. 4. WAYS AN ORGANIZTION CAN CHANGE 5. BUSINESS PROCESS ANALYSIS (BPA) DEFINITIONS

  • Business Process : A set of related work tasks designed to achieve a specific desired business objective. The process result may be customer or market oriented or internal to the organization.
  • Business Process Analysis : Defining the task set required to support the achievement of the business objective.
  • Logical Design : Design of the Information System User Interface needed to support the performance of each task in the business process task set.

6.

  • Belief that public health only delivers services
  • -hinders more comprehensive evaluation of
  • underlying business processes
  • Public Health Departments are in fact businesses
  • -their products and services can be defined and
  • are similar across departments
  • Best practices are a derivative of the associated business process
  • Understanding the business practices helps optimize the use of information system requirements and content across all health departments

WHY CONSIDER BUSINESSPROCESSES IN PUBLIC HEALTH? 7.

  • One must understand the way in which work is donebefore one can explore ways of improving or streamlining it.
  • Public health is always being asked to do more with less. Becoming more efficient in the way in which work is done is one way to stretch limited resources.
  • Understanding how work is done now is a baseline for evaluating and adopting all or parts of a best practice model.

WHY CONSIDER BUSINESSPROCESSES IN PUBLIC HEALTH? 8. A HISTORIC BPA EXAMPLE

  • Ford Motor Company-- Highland Park 1913
  • Automobile Assembly Paradigm prior to 1913:
  • Result: Time cut from 750 minutes to
  • 90 minutes/car through worksimplification
  • What enabled Ford to build Highland Park?
  • In 1915 Highland Park employed 7,000 people. Why didnt other companies follow this example?

9. ANALYSIS FRAMEWORKS

  • Functional Decomposition : process of continual sub setting
  • Functional Analysis :
    • a) logical process of building a framework and then fleshing out the details one logical step at a time
  • b) the result of functional analysis is parallelto assembly instructions for a productrather than a parts explosion (e.g.,assemblies, subassemblies, parts)
  • Use Case Analysis : Typically a random walk if multiple use cases are involved

10. FUNCTIONAL ANALYSIS

  • How do you work a 1000 piece jig saw puzzle?
  • Step #1: __________________
  • Step #2: __________________
  • Step #3: __________________
  • Step #N: __________________
  • How do you know when youre done?
  • What does it mean if there are still holes in the puzzle?
  • What does it mean if you have extra pieces when there are no holes left?

11. BASIC MODEL (INPUT-PROCESS-OUTPUT) 12. THE KEY QUESTIONS INDEFINING A BUSINESS PROCESS

  • What are the tasks in the task set that define the business process?
  • How are the tasks related to one another?
  • How is the process initiated?
  • What is the goal/objective associated with the performance of the business process?

13. OUR APPROACH Three Step Sequential Process

  • Step #1: Context Diagramming:
  • Designed to identify the participants (know as entities) which are the stakeholders in a given business process and the interactions between them.
  • Step #2: Functional Flow Analysis:
  • Identify the interactions and/or transactions associated with each entity that trigger a set of tasks to be performed or represents achievement of the business goals/objectives. The sum of all the task sets creates an integrated description of the work that defines the business process.
  • Step #3: User Interface Logical Design:
  • Each task identified in the analysis is examined to define the corresponding screen or set of screens needed to fully support the user in the performance of the task.

14. CONTEXT ANALYSIS 15. EXAMPLE PROJECT CONTEXT DIAGRAM 16. FUNCTIONAL FLOW ANALYSIS 17. TASK FLOW DIAGRAMMING

  • Concept of turning the Context Diagram inside out
  • A transaction or set of transactions pointing to a given participant (entity) either:
    • trigger a set of tasks to be performed
    • represent the goal/objective of the business process
  • Tasks must be identified and defined at the discrete level. In another sense, a task can be defined as what goes on between the in-basket and the out-basket
  • The task flow tool set is the same as standard flowcharting (primarily boxes, decision diamonds, and arrows)

18. FUNCTIONAL FLOW ILLUSTRATION 19. PERSON DEMOGRAPHIC PROCESS 20. CASE INVESTIGATION 21. USER INTERFACE ANALYSIS 22. LOGICAL DESIGN CONTENT

  • In general we break the logical design out into a number of sections based on the segmentation of the functional flow analysis. Each section utilizes the same format:
  • a) Introduction to the section contents
    • b) Associated Functional Flow Diagram
    • c) Associated Screen Navigation Diagram
    • d) Screen mock ups, text description of the content and purpose of each screen and navigation buttons to access other screens
    • e) Logical Data Structures associated withscreens in section

23. DISEASE INVESTIGATIONFUNCTIONAL FLOW 24. SYSTEM NAVIGATIONDIAGRAM EXAMPLE 25. LOGICAL DATA SET EXPLANATION 26. Lab Report Logical Data Set Laboratory Reports Note ID Text Line (1,M ) General Lab Notes (0,N) Test Report (1,M) Note ID Note Date Note Author Text Line (1,L) Person ID Case ID Lab Report ID Lab Report Date Lab Name Director Name & Phone # Line Number Text Line Number Text

  • Legend
  • ItalicsData Set Name
  • BoldCode Table
  • (1,x) One to Many
  • (0,x) Null to Many
  • { -Delineates a data set

Test ID Test Description Accession Number Specimen ID/Type Specimen Collection Date Result Date Results Reference Range Lab Test Results Notes (0,N) 27. SAMPLE SCREEN: CASE BASE RECORD 28. SAMPLE SCREEN: CASE-CONTACT DETAIL 29. SAMPLE SCREEN: LOCATION TRACKING 30. SAMPLE SCREEN: INVESTIGATION ACTIONS 31. QUESTIONS OR COMMENTS? Pete Kitch 316-682-0900 [email_address]