Platinum Collection v-22 Osprey Manual

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<p>About The Platinum CollectionThis V-22 Osprey is one of several aircraft that youll find at our www.abacuspub.com website. The Platinum Collection is a series of high quality add-ons for Microsoft Flight Simulator 2004 and FSX that are delivered directly to you over the Internet. Although you can find hundreds of add-ons in virtually every category of flight simulation, you may have already discovered that the quality of these add-ons varies greatly. We have, however, carefully selected only top of the line aircraft to include in the Abacus Platinum Collection. By working with the best designers in flight simulation, whose names that you know and trust, we are able to deliver some of the finest products in their category.</p> <p>Copyright 2008</p> <p>Abacus Suite A 5130 Patterson Ave SE Grand Rapids, MI 49512 www.abacuspub.com</p> <p>This manual is copyrighted. No part of this manual may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise without the prior written permission of Abacus Software. Every effort has been made to ensure complete and accurate information concerning the material presented in this book. However, Abacus Software can neither guarantee nor be held legally responsible for any mistakes in printing or faulty instructions contained in this manual. The editors always appreciate receiving notice of any errors or misprints. The content of this software and manual are based upon actual names and events. We have strived for historical, aeronautical and geographical accuracy in every aspect. However, we cannot guarantee that you wont find errors or misprints. Please keep in mind this is primarily an entertainment package and should not be used as an naval, aviation or historic reference. This book contains trade names and trademarks of companies. Any mention of these names or trademarks in this manual are not intended to either convey endorsement or other associations with this manual. Printed in the U.S.A. ISBN 1-55755-793-4 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1</p> <p>ContentsINTRODUCTION ................................................................................................... 5Advantages Over Helicopter and Aircraft ......................................................................................................................6 How The Osprey Flies ...................................................................................................................................................7 Long, expensive and controversial development ..........................................................................................................7 Development ................................................................................................................................................................. 8 Design ...........................................................................................................................................................................9</p> <p>SPECIFICATIONS............................................................................................... 13 CHECKLIST ........................................................................................................ 17 COCKPIT &amp; INSTRUMENTS .............................................................................. 21Cockpit ............................................................................................................................................. 22 Throttle Panel .................................................................................................................................. 24 Radio Stack ..................................................................................................................................... 26</p> <p>Abacus Platinum Collection: V-22 Osprey</p> <p>5</p> <p>INTRODUCTION</p> <p>6Aircraft designers tried for many years to design an aircraft that was both capable of flying long ranges at high speeds and carrying heavy cargo as well as hovering and landing similar to a helicopter. Many designers believed that this type of aircraft had the flexibility not only to handle many different types of military missions but would also have civilian and commercial uses. The V-22 Osprey is one such aircraft. Its designed to perform missions similar to a conventional helicopter but with the long-range, high-speed cruise performance of a turboprop aircraft. Its a tilt-rotor vertical/short takeoff and landing (VSTOL), multi-mission aircraft. The aircrafts rotors can fold, and the wings can rotate so it can be stored on an aircraft carrier. The idea of a VSTOL aircraft isnt new; the German Luftwaffe considered the idea during the last months of World War II. Although the U.S. Navy developed two experimental VTOL fighter aircraft after World War II, called the Pogo and the Salmon, both programs were cancelled because of technical problems. Bell and the U.S. Air Force developed and tested the first successful VTOL to hover in 1958, called the Bell XV-3, but it wasnt tested in airplane flight. Although the XV-3 never was tested in airplane flight, Bell considered the program to be at least feasible and continued working. The research and work by Bell</p> <p>Abacus Platinum Collection: V-22 Ospreyresulted in the XV-15 tilt-rotor program, which in July 1979 became the first aircraft to tilt from helicopter to airplane and back again. It was also capable of traveling 346 miles per hour in airplane mode. The success of the tests lead to the expansion of the program, which was renamed the V-22 Osprey.</p> <p>The tilt-rotor vertical takeoff and landing CV-22 Osprey will meet a longstanding Air Force Special Operations Command requirement for a vehicle that can conduct long-range, high-speed, vertical lift operations in adverse weather and night conditions. (Photo Courtesy United States Air Force)</p> <p>Abacus Platinum Collection: V-22 Osprey</p> <p>7</p> <p>Two Navy Seals get hoisted up into a CV-22 Osprey during a training mission June 28. The Osprey and aircrew are from the 8th Special Operations Squadron at Hurlburt Field, Fla. (Photo Courtesy U.S. Air Force | Photographer Senior Airman Andy M. Kin)</p> <p>8Advantages Over Helicopter and Aircraft The V-22 Osprey has several important advantages over a helicopter, including: Higher speed The Ospreys top airspeed is 315 mph, or about twice the airspeed of a helicopter. Increased cargo capacity The Osprey can carry 10,000 pounds of cargo or 24 troops. Longer range The Osprey can fly greater distances (up to 580 miles) than a helicopter and in a quicker time. The Osprey has advantages over an airplane such as: Capability of taking off, hovering and landing like a helicopter. More versatile than an aircraft for missions such as transporting troops to remote areas, especially those without landing strips, or conducting longrange rescue operations at sea. How The Osprey Flies The Osprey has two, large, three-bladed rotors that rotate in opposite directions and produce lift. A helicopter requires a tail rotor to maintain stability but</p> <p>Abacus Platinum Collection: V-22 Osprey</p> <p>The CV-22 Osprey fires countermeasures out of one of the rear buckets, or storage areas for countermeasures, during a safe-separation test over the precision impact range area here. (Photo Courtesy United States Air Force | Photo by Kevin Kidd)</p> <p>this is unnecessary on the V-22 because the rotors spin in opposite directions. The wing tilts the rotors between airplane and helicopter modes and generates lift in the airplane mode. The pilot can convert the Osprey from helicopter mode to airplane mode in only a few seconds. The ability to create lift is critical to any aircraft regardless whether its a Piper Cub or an Airbus A380. The V-22, however, must create lift a bit differently from either a helicopter or aircraft.</p> <p>Abacus Platinum Collection: V-22 OspreyWhen the Osprey is ready to take off, its rotors are in a vertical position so that it resembles a two-bladed helicopter. When the Osprey is in helicopter mode (on takeoff, landing and when hovering), the rotors generate lift. While in flight, the rotors move down to a horizontal position. In this position, its the wings that generate lift, as on a conventional airplane, and the rotors function as they do in a propeller aircraft. The Osprey lands like a helicopter by reversing the process, raising the rotors from a horizontal to a vertical position. Long, expensive and controversial development The development of the V-22 has been long, expensive and controversial. Its mechanical, technical and even political difficulties have not only delayed its availability to the US military but also threatened to end the program entirely. When the development budget went from the projected $2.5 billion in 1986 to $30 billion in 1988, Secretary of Defense Dick Cheney attempted to downsize or even eliminate the program four times. Congress, however, overruled his decisions each time. Its been over 25 years since the V-22 program has begun and the Pentagon has already spent over $20 billion. Although this seems like a small amount compared to the hundreds of billions of dollars the government is spending in rescues and bailouts today but the Pentagon may spend another $35 billion before the V-22 Osprey program is finally completed.NOTE:</p> <p>9The FAA (Federal Aviation Administration) has classified tilt rotors as powered lift aircraft, which means theyre neither airplane nor rotorcraft.</p> <p>Various V-22 crashes have claimed the thirty lives and this was before the aircraft even saw combat. Time magazine in a September 2007 article about the first combat deployment of the MV-22 condemned the aircraft as unsafe, overpriced and completely inadequate. (Read the article by clicking here: http:// w w w. t i m e . c o m / t i m e / p o l i t i c s / a r t i c l e / 0,8599,1665835,00.html). The Marine Corps responded by mentioning that much of the articles data was dated, obsolete, inaccurate, and with expectations that ran too high for any new field of aircraft. Development The Pentagon began the V-22 program in 1981, initially under Army leadership before the Navy and Marine Corps took the lead in developing what was then known as the Joint-service Vertical takeoff/landing Experimental (JVX) aircraft. Full-scale development of the V-22 tilt-rotor aircraft began in 1986.</p> <p>10</p> <p>Abacus Platinum Collection: V-22 OspreyAir Force CV-22 Ospreys take off from a Kirtland Air Force Base, N.M. May 1 for a training mission. The Osprey is a tiltrotor aircraft that combines vertical takeoff, hover and landing qualities of a helicopter with the normal flight characteristics of a turboprop aircraft. (Photograph Courtesy U.S. Air Force photo | Photographer Staff Sgt. Markus Maier)</p> <p>Abacus Platinum Collection: V-22 OspreyThe first of six MV-22 prototypes flew for the first time on March 19, 1989 in the helicopter mode and on September 14, 1989 as a fixed-wing aircraft. The third and fourth prototypes successfully completed the first sea trials on the USS Wasp in December 1990. However, two prototypes crashed in 1990 and 1991. Flight tests were resumed in August 1993 after various changes and modifications were made to the remaining prototypes. The first pre-production V-22 was delivered to the Naval Air Warfare Test Center in Patuxent River, MD in early 1997. Flight testing on this V-22 began shortly thereafter. The first EMD (Engineering &amp; Manufacturing Development) flight occurred in early February 1997. The first of four low-rate initial production aircraft, ordered in April 1997 was delivered the following month. Another Osprey completed the programs second sea trials testing in January 1999 from the USS Saipan. Meanwhile, Boeing performed external load testing in April 1999 during which a V-22 was used to lift and transport an a 7,000-pound M777 howitzer. The V-22 completed its final operational evaluation in June 2005, which was considered successful. These evaluation tests included long-range deployments, high altitude, desert and shipboard operations. The Pentagon formally approved full-rate production for the V-22 in September 2005. The plan was to boost production from eleven a year to up to 48 a year by</p> <p>112012. The Pentagon V-22 production plans include 360 for the Marine Corps, 48 for the Navy, and 50 for the Air Force at an average cost of $110 million per aircraft. In addition to the U.S. military, Bell is also exploring its design for possible civilian uses. Design One pilot and copilot control the V-22 along with an aircrew appropriate for the specific service and type of mission being flown. Two engines supply the power for the V-22. Its design incorporates advanced but proven technologies in composite materials, fly-by-wire flight controls, digital cockpits and other manufacturing designs. The airframe consists mostly of graphite-reinforced epoxy composite material for strength, corrosion resistance and ability to withstand battle damage. The V-22 also features redundant and separate flight control, electrical and hydraulic system. Other defensive features include a radar warning receiver, a missile warning set and a countermeasures dispensing system. The V-22 also has a rear loading ramp that also makes up the lower portion of the aft fuselage section when its closed. There is one side-entry personnel door.</p> <p>12</p> <p>Abacus Platinum Collection: V-22 OspreyThe empennage consists of a horizontal stabilizer and two vertical stabilizers. The horizontal stabilizer consists of two spars that are attached at each end to the vertical stabilizer. The vertical stabilizer consists of two spars that coincide with the two horizontal stabilizer spars. The T406-AE-1107 engines, auxiliary internal fuel capacity and an aerial refueling capability give the V-22 the ability to fly to any location. Two 6150 shaft horsepower turboshaft engines each drive 38-foot diameter, 3-bladed tiltable rotating propellers, called proprotors. The proprotors are connected to each other by interconnect shafting for proper synchronization and provides single engine power to both proprotors in case one engine fails. The engines and flight controls are controlled by a triple-redundant digital fly-by-wire system.</p> <p>This image highlights many of the external features of the V-22 Osprey. Please note that not all the features listed here are featured on the Abacus Platinum Collection V-22 Osprey.</p> <p>SPECIFICATIONS</p> <p>CHECKLIST</p> <p>Checklists</p> <p>18This section describes the checklist procedures for the V-22 Osprey. They describe necessary settings and operations for the aircraft. Although you dont need to start with a "dark and cold" panel/engine, if you want to get the maximum from this information, you should create an adequate starting situation. As a reminder, these checklists are only for Microsoft Flight Simulator and not any real world flying situations or conditions. The data is as...</p>